Alleged resume fraud of co-resident. What to do?

Discussion in 'General Residency Issues' started by decgra, 09.29.14.

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  1. decgra

    decgra

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    I'm a resident at a great IM program. Its among the top preference for IMG's.

    A few days back, I overheard a phone conversation of one of our interns with a 2015 match applicant. She did not realise anyone else was in the room, and was giving tips for the ERAS application.

    To my surprise, I heard her tell this applicant to pad the research section of the CV with non existent stuff- to cook up a few researches as 'awaiting ethical committee clearance', a few as 'ongoing data collection' and also to write some friends completed researches as your own. She said that its going to be fine as nobody bothers to check. "It worked for me and it will work for you too".

    Later I confronted her and asked her about this. She laughed it off and said I heard wrong.

    Needless to say, I'm angry and confused. A few of my classmates from med school are working as lab research assistants now (cleaning lab apparatus etc.), hoping to somehow make it through the next match, and then there are people like this?

    Should I do something about this? Hope someone can advise me.
     
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  3. graddoc2013

    graddoc2013 2+ Year Member

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    i hope she has to pay for this false information, it totally unfair for many IMG's who work their butts off to improve CV
     
  4. SouthernSurgeon

    SouthernSurgeon Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    Let it go
     
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  5. Raryn

    Raryn Infernal Internist Gold Donor 7+ Year Member

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    In a situation like this, your options are basically either A) Confront the person or B) Report the person. You really don't want to do both, because then they'll know who reported them and it's really a pain in your ass at that point. Given you've already picked A, I'd drop it. I mean, in an ideal world you might report them anyway, but you never know what they or one of their friends will do to get back at you at that point.
     
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  6. SplenoMegastar

    SplenoMegastar MS4 7+ Year Member

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    I can see why you would be upset about this, but also agree that you should let it go.

    And I don't mean to be a jerk here, but as someone with a PhD being told that most programs won't give a crap about my research, I am hoping that those friends cleaning lab apparatuses are not then going to call that a valuable research experience to help them get into residency. I appreciate that they're doing tedious labor, but if that's what most of their work is, they won't be honest when they report their "research" either. If they're doing experiments and just doing their own glassware, that is something that many have had to do.

    But most importantly, if you heard correctly, that person is dishonest and I'm sorry that you have to deal with walking around knowing that.
     
  7. DrZeke

    DrZeke yzarc gniog ylwolS 10+ Year Member

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    I spent years in the lab working on projects that sometimes yielded little. I understand your frustration. I know people who have literally gotten their name slapped on a paper for doing next to nothing or become first author when they didn't write it. I also know people who have written proposals knowin they would get rejected but did it for the sole purpose of upcoming ERAS application.

    None of this is fair but life isn't fair. You won't come out on top by reporting this person. In due time people like this eventually have to put out something real and can't hack it. Eventually if you're a fraud it comes out.

    Just keep your head down and keep working. You'll only hurt yourself by reporting her and you may not get a fair outcome in the end
     
  8. DocBlin

    DocBlin 2+ Year Member

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    Decgra: You have no proof to expose this co resident. You stated you heard her side of the phone call, but even if you heard both sides you were not present to hear everything. Therefore the response from her will be you heard out of context. Just file this away and keep your guard up around her. If you know she is dishonest, others will discover this also from her actions during the residency. Understand your residency is ONLY 3 years. After finishing, I doubt you will ever see or hear from her again the rest of your practice life.
     
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  9. calvnandhobbs68

    calvnandhobbs68 I KNOW NOTHING 5+ Year Member

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    I mean, as far as I've heard, research that isn't published or presented somewhere isn't really gonna help your application that much anyway. Especially with this (now well known) issue of resume fraud and padding (that there have been multiple papers published about), slapping a couple of fake-ass research projects that nobody can verify isn't going to help her application as far as I've been told.

    Who's gonna take seriously some project that's noted as "awaiting ethical committee clearance"? That means that you haven't even cleared the IRB proposal yet...which means your research essentially doesn't exist.
     
  10. gutonc

    gutonc No Meat, No Treat SDN Administrator 10+ Year Member

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    Keep your head down and your eye on this person. She will make trouble for people, make sure it's not you.
    I don't even know what this statement means but I kind of LOL'd at it anyway.
     
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  11. JJMrK

    JJMrK J to the J Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    The other option is do nothing, which is what I would recommend. Mind your own stuff, don't try to police the world.
     
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  12. aProgDirector

    aProgDirector Pastafarians Unite! SDN Advisor SDN Moderator 10+ Year Member

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    Well isn't this interesting. I feel very differently. If this happened in my program, I would absolutely want to know about it.

    Here's why: I could (mostly) care less that they lied about their research background. Yes, I'd be angry. And yes, the resident would be put in a remediation program over this. But the main thing I am concerned about is that if the resident is willing to lie about this, they are probably willing to lie about more important things. Like if they checked the CT. Or spoke to the family. Or any number of other little things that, if you don't do them, most of the time no one notices and nothing bad happens. But we all know that it only takes one bad such event to cause a bunch of damage.

    And what I'd do is pull everyone's applications and check everyone's research and volunteer experiences. We'd call them all. And then anyone found faking their resume would be in the same boat. That might protect the OP, somewhat.

    I guess I am amazed that you all would think that the other residents would stand by the person who lied, rather than the person who stood up for the truth and what was right.
     
  13. JJMrK

    JJMrK J to the J Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    Certainly wouldn't stand up for anybody found to be lying. Also wouldn't actively speak out against them unless they were directly causing me problems or adversely affecting patient care.
     
  14. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    upload_2014-9-30_22-40-48.jpeg
     
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  15. rokshana

    rokshana Member 10+ Year Member

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    i can see why people here would say let it go….many times being a whistle blower of sorts comes back to bite you in the butt…
    and would you as a PD give this situation much credence? Its not like the OP has solid evidence that a co intern had falsified her application….just an overheard conversation...
     
  16. Dodgers75

    Dodgers75 2+ Year Member

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    Umm... I do not know why people say that it is impossible for OP to be anonymous.

    If it was me, I would let it go without a second thought, but if OP gets bothered or feels the urge to do the 'right thing.' Then, he/she can simply create a gmail account and send PD an email, saying that OP recently found out about alleged resume fraud of a co-resident and ask the PD if he/she would like to investigate further. Be sure to mention that you would be much more comfortable remaining anonymous throughout the whole process (for obvious reasons!).

    1) If there is no response, then OP can simply move on with his/her life.
    2) If PD replies, then OP can expose the details like name of the co-resident and her fraud with the research section.

    Well... I think I would at least try it this way if I absolutely feel the need to address the issue.
     
    Last edited: 10.01.14
  17. DrZeke

    DrZeke yzarc gniog ylwolS 10+ Year Member

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    Things to consider that may have been mentioned:

    1) Some programs gossip a ton and conversations between PD/faculty don't stay quiet. ALSO OP already gave liar co resident girl a heads up by asking her if he heard that convo right. He confronted her...

    2) like someone said before ppl like Co resident girl will make trouble for you. She feels entitled to be in your residency program.

    3) I'll say it again....Life isn't fair and hard work doesn't always result in rewards. Real life doesn't work like tests. Some people get ahead and they didn't work hard...

    So, OP ask yourself why this is important to you. Is it about doing the right thing and you are one of those people whose all about standing on principle? Or is it about "she doesn't deserve it" or "how dare she?".

    Think long and hard, because you're not gonna teach your co-resident a lesson. And you already put yourself on her radar.
     
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  18. DocBlin

    DocBlin 2+ Year Member

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    A prog... I usually am on board with all your recommendations and responses. But here is a case of pure 'hearsay' evidence. Seems like guilty and need to prove innocence ??? Yes, checking on the listed research should be a requirement prior to interviews but I understand this would be a monumental additional effort. After the fact checking though possible might only make you and the program decide there was dishonesty and lead to termination. There is NO GOOD answer. But definitive evidence not over hearing a phone call is paramount in this situation. Just an ole MD opinion...
     
  19. Gastrapathy

    Gastrapathy no longer apathetic Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    He's an IMG in a residency. Getting embroiled in this sort of conflict has risk to his ability to make a living for the next 40+ years. Not worth it.
     
  20. evilbooyaa

    evilbooyaa 5+ Year Member

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    There is no 'anonymous' method of reporting her at this point. If she gets investigated she knows it's because you ratted her out.

    I would've said report what you heard prior to confronting her, or do nothing at this point. Even if you're right and she gets in hot water over this situation, she's going to get you back for this, eventually.

    aPD's outlook is as expected for a program director, since eventually the resident in question will likely botch something of significant importance with her lies. If you (the OP) believe that the PD can find a way to investigate EVERYONE instead of singling out the lying resident, then maybe consider reporting her.

    Tough situation, and depends on how angry you are that your friends didn't match at that residency, whether you want to stick your neck out for your co resident to possibly chop it off.
     
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  21. aProgDirector

    aProgDirector Pastafarians Unite! SDN Advisor SDN Moderator 10+ Year Member

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    I agree, it's only a hearsay conversation. And I don't even need a name. If I thought this was happening in my program, as mentioned I would check every reference in everyone's application. Once I had a complete database, I'd know if this was a systematic problem or isolated to a single/few individuals. If everything checks out, then no problem. If not, then we address it. What exactly I would do would depend upon what I had found, and what the person's response was. It's a ton of work, so I wouldn't do it unless I had heard that there might be a problem.

    I agree that in this case, the OP has the "problem" that they confronted the person themselves. So, if the program investigates, it may be very clear what happened despite any attempt at anonymity. I guess it's possible that this person could try to retaliate -- anything overtly aggressive would result in termination, but they could be passive-aggressive and refuse to swap calls / cover when needed / etc. I still find it amazing that people think that others not involved would "gang up" on the resident, rather than taking their side -- but I'm an idealist at heart. Or that the program leadership would see this as not being a "team player". But that's certainly possible.
     
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  22. visari

    visari 2+ Year Member

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    I think any wise committee when they see that an applicant has tons of unrelated and unfinished "research projects" but zero presentations/posters/publications, they should assume it's probably all BS. Nobody's stupid you know. These people can pad their CVs with this nonsense as much as they want and it's only gonna make their applications look rather "suspicious" for any reputable program.

    That doesn't mean that your co-resident is not a horrible human being. I remember that when you certify your application in ERAS, the fine print says something that you're legally responsible if you provide any false information. So I'm sure if someone is serious about digging back in her application and checking all the details (and that would be a PD or APD), they can do her some serious harm. but in real life, nothing will happen and this will come back to bite you in the butt. I wouldn't have confronted her. I would either keep my mouth shut and avoid this parasite for the rest of my life, or just go to the PD directly and give him this information to deal with and ask for strict anonymity while he runs his investigation if he chooses to and decides what he wants to do. confronting and then letting it go seems to be the wrong thing to do.
     
  23. dozitgetchahi

    dozitgetchahi 7+ Year Member

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    When my class was applying for residency, I was surprised at how many people thought nothing of puffing up the ol' resume with completely fabricated activities and research. It's rampant.

    If you really care about this, I suggest you search through all your residents' apps right now. I can virtually guarantee you this is happening right under your own nose, regardless of whether anyone 'thinks there's a problem' or not. Then, start searching through all interviewees' apps and report all the people who are doing this. It's the only way this crap is ever going to stop.

    Not doing this is tantamount to burying your head in the sand. The research indicates this is widespread. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the reason why so few residents report this stuff is that they know their own resumes are loaded with half-truths and nonsense.
     
  24. NeuroOsler

    NeuroOsler 2+ Year Member

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    As dozitgetchahi said the problem is not new...

    ENT: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22422816
    Radiology: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10987335
    Pathology: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23808471 (18%)
    Emergency medicine: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16105178 see "Investigators were reluctant to notify applicants' dean's offices and the NRMP"

    And finally http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22301038 "Applicants that list multiple unpublished manuscripts have a significant competitive advantage in matching into a dermatology residency, even if these manuscripts remain unpublished."
     
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  25. dozitgetchahi

    dozitgetchahi 7+ Year Member

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    But wait, there's more:

    Rad onc: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17412057
    Urology: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22729465
    Optho: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20625054
    Plastics: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22929257
    Plastics, part 2: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22421486
    'Among plastic surgery residency applicants, we found a significant percentage of unverifiable publications. There are several possible explanations for our findings, which include the fact that plastic surgery is a highly sought-after specialty and applicants may feel the need to appear competitive to residency programs. Publications are an important aspect of the residency selection process and factors into applicant ranking, but our study suggests publications listed in plastic surgery residency applications may not necessarily be an accurate representation of actual published articles. Program directors and faculty are advised to scrutinize listed publications carefully when evaluating applicants.'
     
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  26. Phloston

    Phloston Lifetime Donor 2+ Year Member

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    A program that doesn't care about your research is one that isn't worthy of you. Anyone who's been through the research process knows how astronomically fastidious and tedious it is to finish a PhD. I was a PhD candidate but loathed it. I converted it into a completed MPhil and couldn't be more elated with the downgrade. That being said, there are programs that will most certainly love you for your PhD. As we say here in Australia, good on ya.
     
  27. QofQuimica

    QofQuimica Seriously, dude, I think you're overreacting.... Lifetime Donor SDN Administrator 10+ Year Member

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    The OP has no proof that this girl lied. In fact, when the OP confronted her, the girl said the OP misheard her. Especially if this girl is an American, how easy it would be for her to turn this all around on the OP, who is, after all, an IMG and doesn't "hear" things in English "right." She comes out looking like a rose, and the OP takes the fall as being jealous, vindictive, and mean-spirited. Don't think that could happen? Then I'd say this is less an issue of you being an idealist, and more an issue of you forgetting what it's like to be a resident, especially one who is being put under further scrutiny by the PD because of a co-resident "ratting" someone out with no proof. Even if s/he had incontrovertible proof, the OP should still think twice before stirring up a hornet's nest and making trouble for all his/her co-residents. Without it, the OP would be a d*** fool to take things any farther.

    OP, I agree with the advice you've gotten from most of the others. Nothing good can come from you making anything out of this. On the odd chance you did "mishear" her (which I don't believe for a second), you'd be inciting a witch hunt against an innocent person. On the much more likely chance that you heard her correctly, if your PD goes nuts combing through everyone's CVs like aPD suggested he would do, none of your fellow residents are going to appreciate that your candor is putting them under further scrutiny one iota. So just keep your mouth shut and stay far, far away from this girl. And next time you come across a situation like this, don't confront the person, either.
     
  28. Over9000

    Over9000

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    i recommend the op watch Game of Thrones season 1. He should then reflect on what character his fate would most resemble if he decides to pursue this matter further.
     
    Last edited: 10.03.14
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  29. SouthernSurgeon

    SouthernSurgeon Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    This.

    I think the bigger problem for the OP than fallout with the girl who allegedly lied on her resume, would be the fallout with the rest of his peers.

    If the data holds, there is a good chance that a third of his peers or more will have discrepancies of some kind on their resumes. Now most will probably end up being innocent mistakes or incomplete information, sure.

    But the potentially dozens of interns having to have meetings with the PD and re-review their resumes and explain why that abstract was listed but isn't available on pubmed, etc...they are all going to blame the OP.
     
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  30. DrZeke

    DrZeke yzarc gniog ylwolS 10+ Year Member

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    I actually find this data really terrifying. Is there anything being done to crack down on it or do people just not care?

    I had listed some papers in submission on my app and 1 or 2 that I was working on (spent year of laboratory research full time) for submission. I clearly listed what was "in progress" and what was "submitted". I would be terrified to advance my author position on a paper and had copies of my papers w me at interviews in case I was asked for them...

    Are we just saying... It's ok to lie and have no professional integrity?
     
  31. SouthernSurgeon

    SouthernSurgeon Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    I know anecdotally that our plastics and ENT programs have tried to do more verifying of publications since these studies came out.
     
  32. Over9000

    Over9000

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    Many of your wealthy, most lauded colleagues are liars. They're making more money than you, and obtaining far more professional respect. How do you feel about that?

    I'm mad as Hell.
     
  33. BlondeDocteur

    BlondeDocteur 7+ Year Member

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    I find the advice here terrifying. Its bizarre that you all think blatant dishonesty and fraud should be tolerated. It's bizarre that you think a witch hunt will ensue if he tips off his PD-- at the very least, the PD will vet the resumes of this year's match applicants more closely to ensure s/he doesn't inadvertently let more dishonest people into the program.

    So I guess I'm just a stick in the mud, or whatever, but honestly I applaud the OP's instincts and think it's great that s/he was outraged to learn about this. I think it speaks highly to the OP's character.

    I think too many of you have read too many one-sided 'woe is me, I was fired for absolutely no reason' sdn threads to think someone would legitimately be hounded out of a residency by a PD who was pissed (?) that someone reported dishonest behavior. Actually I can't even concoct a theory of how that would work.
     
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  34. DrZeke

    DrZeke yzarc gniog ylwolS 10+ Year Member

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    I disagree with this. I think many of us think it's legitimate to let it go.

    I don't see anything wrong with not reporting her. He doesn't know for sure what he heard or saw. Also, he confronted her and she denied it. If he goes after her it's his word against hers and no proof, unless the PD opens up her records. He will be hated. You can say who cares, life isn't a popularity contest, but what kind of person is the one who sits at home smiling Saying "good, she got what she deserved". That's some petty **** if you ask me. Even if she lied. You're not gonna sleep well having screwed up someone else's life, deserving or not:
     
    Last edited: 10.04.14
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  35. aProgDirector

    aProgDirector Pastafarians Unite! SDN Advisor SDN Moderator 10+ Year Member

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    I certainly can see both sides of the argument here. From an Ethics standpoint, there is no duty to report. I don't think the argument that "if she did nothing wrong and he reports her, he'll get in a bunch of trouble" holds much water -- I'd review the situation, if there was no problem with her CV that would be the end of it, she would never even know. But if she did fabricate on her CV, then it will come to light, and she probably would know where the complaint started.

    That said, I'll be pulling all of the ERAS applications of every resident currently in my program and double checking all publications and degrees claimed. Anyone found to have fabricated or altered their CV will be put in a remediation program immediately. Any further professionalism issues / lack of honesty will lead to immediate termination. Whether or not it would be reportable to future employers would depend on the severity of the problem. This type of behavior may be commonplace, but it is completely unacceptable.

    I don't have the resources to check all applicants.
     
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  36. BlondeDocteur

    BlondeDocteur 7+ Year Member

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    Perhaps you (or the PCs) could check people whom you would invite to interviews? Or would even that be too time-consuming?

    IIRC I had to put in pubmed IDs in my ERAS last year-- at least that would be immediately, easily verifiable. I never thought the "unpublished data" or "manuscript in process"-type listings counted for much. The tough ones might be those "submitted" or "in press"-- no pubmed ID yet, and very hard to check.
     
  37. operaman

    operaman 5+ Year Member

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    Or, perhaps you could make a point during interviews of telling all the prospective applicants that after the match you will be going through all the incoming residents' applications with a fine tooth comb and anyone who falsified anything will be at risk of immediate termination. Maybe making this clear would encourage the liars not to rank your program at all. Voila, problem solved!
     
  38. rajhanda

    rajhanda

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    How about letting it be known to all applicants that their start dates will be contingent upon a verification of publications? A cursory check could be done by any dept clerk and should have a deterrent effect.
     
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  39. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Agree with Q. There is no real evidence here and the accused party already told the OP he misheard. And maybe he did. For all we know the guy was sarcastically joking with his friend and neither party on the phone would ever really do this -- the OP is only hearing half the conversation and, not knowing the dynamics of the relationship, could be totally wrong in his assessment. It's kind if like the old 70s TV show formula where someone is eavesdropping and thinks they overhear something inappropriate going on on the other side of a bedroom door and it ends up being something totally benign, like planning a surprise party rather than an affair. You shouldn't ever accuse someone of professional fraud if you can't prove it and frankly if you went to your PD and you were wrong, legally you have committed slander and can be sued. there is no "my bad, I misheard" defense. Truth is the only real defense. So no there's not even much if an ethical dilemma here. The law makes it pretty clear -- if you can't prove it, you had better not say anything to a third person.
     
  40. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    fWIW there are plenty of people with publications from other industries that wont appear in pubmed, regardless of how real or prestigious, so this wouldn't be a great solution. And as you have pointed out things "in process" may be real or not but there's not much to verify. PDs need to figure out other metrics to not get scammed, like actually calling references, faculty co-authors.
     
  41. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    this fits the legal definition of "slander" so the law in every state disagrees with you. In our legal system if you are going to question someone's professional integrity you'd better be able to back it up.
     
    Last edited: 10.05.14
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  42. colbgw02

    colbgw02 Delightfully Tacky 10+ Year Member

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    Seems pretty obvious to me that there are ways to raise a PD's suspicion without flat out accusing someone of fraud.
     
  43. SouthernSurgeon

    SouthernSurgeon Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    (a) This is only going to hurt programs. Not having residents available on their start dates means no bodies for coverage. And no way to replenish the pool after match day.

    (b) I wouldn't trust our "department clerks" to find google.com , much less perform an adequately thorough search that you could have enough confidence in to threaten someones' job

    I think if programs are going to do more verification, they HAVE to do it before they rank applicants.
     
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  44. SouthernSurgeon

    SouthernSurgeon Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    I don't think anyone is saying that.

    What people (at least me) are saying is that (a) you have no substantial ground to stand on. As L2D says this could very well be considered slander if you turn out to be wrong, that (b) you've already put a target on your back by saying something directly to this person. Not to mention that she directly said the OP heard wrong, and that (c) as a resident you have to pick your battles.
     
  45. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Sure, without naming names you could hint to the PD in an anonymous email maybe it's worth his/her while to confirm the veracity of each residents claimed research. But I doubt much comes of it at the PD end without precise details. And you've already let the co-resident know that you know so you've put a target on your back. It's lose-lose.
     
  46. colbgw02

    colbgw02 Delightfully Tacky 10+ Year Member

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    Yeah, in this situation, anonymity is out the window, but that wasn't really what I was getting at. My point is that slander and telling the PD are not synonymous. Just report what was heard, without bias or allegation, making sure that the context is appropriately conveyed (e.g. one side of a two-sided conversation). Leave it up to the PD to decide if it merits further action.

    Not sure what I would do in this situation. It would probably depend a lot on my opinion of the other resident, as well as how much I trusted my PD to handle it in an appropriate way.
     
  47. BlondeDocteur

    BlondeDocteur 7+ Year Member

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    It's not slander if it's a) a sincerely held belief and b) it's communicated privately, not publicly to multiple persons such that the person in question's reputation is damaged. He has some evidentiary support, enough to warrant a little look-see. If he's wrong, case closed.

    And while a law review article or a fluid dynamics publication is fine and dandy, they don't count for much in the residency match. I don't think PCs need to get Lexis Nexus accounts just yet-- just work on the biomedical ones.
     
  48. SouthernSurgeon

    SouthernSurgeon Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    I think personally I'd just take away from the situation the lesson that this other resident isn't a trustworthy person. And in future dealings I would always remember this. I would be sure to double check/verify anything they told me in sign outs or consultations.

    Most of us have had to work with residents that we know aren't good or reliable people, unfortunately. But we also aren't in a position or don't have the specific evidence to act on that knowledge.

    *And I say this as someone who had a half hour meeting with my PD and filled out a formal evaluation on one of our interns about their dishonesty and lack of professional reliability, since folks seem to think my moral compass is lacking in this case.
     
  49. P Diddy

    P Diddy california lover 10+ Year Member

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    I would definitely go to the PD; the dismissive attitude from some posters here is appalling, I might even saw lawyerly. I wonder how many of those decrying the approach to inform the PD have skeletons in their CV?

    We don't want to think like lawyers; our profession has integrity. One can go to the PD and report what one heard. It is up to the PD to investigate as they see fit.

    It is likely that nothing would come of this report. It might be that the OP would get some blowback, probably minimal. But it might be that this allegedly fraudulent resident has exhibited a pattern of dubious behavior, and the OP's heads up could prevent further resume fraud, or even more serious actions (dishonest signout, sloppy patient care).

    I look it at it as law enforcement looks at graffiti crackdowns; if people know they'll be held accountable for the small stuff, they're less likely to commit larger crimes.

    p diddy
     
  50. SouthernSurgeon

    SouthernSurgeon Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    Was wondering how long it would take someone to come out with this gem :rolleyes:
     
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  51. DrZeke

    DrZeke yzarc gniog ylwolS 10+ Year Member

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    You're in the wrong profession
     

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