engdoc

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hi... i will finish my pre-req courses to apply for med school within a year or so.. and i was wondering... since most of you have been taking bio and chems for may years... and i only took the bear minimum and lots of physics... will i be at a disadvantage in terms of medical school
cheers
 

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engdoc said:
hi... i will finish my pre-req courses to apply for med school within a year or so.. and i was wondering... since most of you have been taking bio and chems for may years... and i only took the bear minimum and lots of physics... will i be at a disadvantage in terms of medical school
cheers
No
 
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engdoc

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best answer ever lol
 
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I think being an engineering major will help you stand out more as long as you still do what med schools want you to do (volunteering, clinical, research, etc.)

I'm kind of in the same boat, having obtained degrees in both chemical engineering and biochemistry...I have a little more bio exposure than you may due to the biochem degree, but schools want you to try different things!...all of my research experiences have been engineering related (chem eng and biomat eng), but they have still been fulfilling nonetheless...

Just make sure you know why you want to go to med school and you should be ok...plus, being an eng major will help justify a lower GPA than most other majors! :p
 
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engdoc

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thanks.. anyways my main concern here is... will pre-med/bio pre meds have an advantage over me when we start med school... since i know bolts and screws and they know more related things
 

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No...not really. For one thing, most people kinda forget everything they learned by the time they get to med school anyway, so don't worry too much about it lol.

I'm studying for the MCATs after taking a year off so far, and when I first sat down everything might as well have been written in hieroglyphs.
 

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You're def. not at a disadvantage. As I've heard it, most Allopathic schools look for students who didn't go the bio/chem/bio-chem/etc. route. So take the pre-med classes, the MCAT, and apply.
 

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The above posters are right. Plus, most of the med school material is much more in-depth than anything learned in undergrad. Granted, some things might be slightly easier if you've had exposure to say, Physiology, Embryology, Biochem, etc., but that doesn't necessarily mean that you will be at a disadvantage because you havn't had these classes. I'de assume it's similar to the advantage that AP's give you in undergrad. They will only help in a select group of classes, and only slightly at that, and they could even be a disadvantage if you have to unlearn a lot of things or if they lead you to take a more relaxed approach than you should.
 

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personally, i think the first year of medical school is much easier to swallow for students who have taken biochemistry, microbiology, etc. sure, you will be capable of understanding anything they throw at you, but it's the speed and volume of material covered that makes it hard...so seeing it once before helps, in my opinion.
 

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yes, but only because you probably would have had a higher gpa if u wernt engineering
 

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I've had admissions councilors tell me that they like students from any background besides engineering.
 

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TauPathology said:
I've had admissions councilors tell me that they like students from any background besides engineering.
I've actually heard the opposite. I've heard that ADCOMs like engineers. But I'll agree with the above posters that med school is easier to handle if you have had lots of bio, biochem, etc. So, just take a semester of biochem in addition to your pre-med requirements (if you have the room) and that should help you immensely with 1st-year biochem in med school. After the first semester of med school, everyone is pretty much on the same page anyway.

I've also heard that ADCOMs recognize that engineers might have slightly lower GPAs because it's so difficult.
 

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As always, the answer depends upon who you are as a person, and your specific academic background.

Plusses of engineering WRT medical school admissions:

1. Not that many engineers apply to medical school.
2. Engineering majors/coursework are/is much more challenging major than your garden variety science/liberal arts major, and ADCOMS know it.
3. You really learn how to learn as an engineering major, as opposed to being able to get by by just memorizing. Granted, Medical School is a lot about memorizing large amounts of information, but you learn to do this more efficiently as an engineer, IMHO.

Minuses of engineering WRT medical school admissions:

1. Classes are far more challenging and your GPA will be lower than most of your applicant peers. You get no quantitative bonus points for this, so your application may be a little weaker on the numbers side.
2. One of the stereotypes of engineers is that they are socially inept, and, this is something that won't fly when you are a doctor. I believe that LizzyM posted that, in her experience, engineering applicants need to overcome this stereotype during the admissions process.
3. Some schools (UT-H comes to mind immediately) specifically say that they prefer their applicants to come from liberal arts/science backgrounds over "technical/vocational" backgrounds like engineering, business, etc. I don't know of any other school that publicly states this, but for every school that publicly states it, there are probably a few that have it as a non-public policy.

There are certainly other +s and -s, but I don't have a lot of time right now.....

If I manage to get into medical school this cycle, I will be happy to share my experiences. I have 2 interview invites already, so coming from an engineering background can't be THAT bad!

Good Luck to all engineers!

Jota
 
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I don't know about your school... But any chemistry major is about on par with engineering at UF. With that said, chemistry does give you the option to not take the absolute hardest classes, while engineering doesnt have that type of luxury.

What was your thinking in deciding to go to med school instead of an engineering career?(curiosity only) Its a big difference in school and salary for a long time.
 

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jota_jota said:
...2. One of the stereotypes of engineers is that they are socially inept, and, this is something that won't fly when you are a doctor...

You obviously don't know many doctors. I have seen behavior towards patients by doctors which would make you cringe.

My impression is that most doctors are somewhat inept socially, especially when they first get started.

But good post otherwise.
 

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TauPathology said:
I've had admissions councilors tell me that they like students from any background besides engineering.
I've actually heard similar statements. When schools look for diversity from outside bio/chem, they mean anything outside science in general and non-geeky, such as architecture, liberal arts, and business. Many still consider engineering to be in the science category.

I think many people assume engineers/comp sci are all geeks. You'll have a harder time on paper, especially if you have anything else "geeky" on it. You just need high enough MCAT/GPA and ECs to force an interview, then that becomes the deciding factor.

GL :luck:
 

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TauPathology said:
I don't know about your school... But any chemistry major is about on par with engineering at UF. With that said, chemistry does give you the option to not take the absolute hardest classes, while engineering doesnt have that type of luxury.

What was your thinking in deciding to go to med school instead of an engineering career?(curiosity only) Its a big difference in school and salary for a long time.
I can't really comment about the difficulty of upper-division chemistry classes, as I haven't taken anything higher-level than O-chem and Biochemistry, both of which I found to be a piece-of-cake compared to any of my Engineering classes. So, I'll grant you that I may not have seen how difficult higher-level science classes can get.

As far as why I am giving up my engineering career (I have been an EE for 10 years, and am a non-traditional med. school applicant,) there are many reasons. While it is true that engineering is financially rewarding, it is not really "spiritually" rewarding. I am not one of those socially inept engineers (BTW: Panda Bear, I totally agree with you about some doctors -- I was trying to convey my perceived attitude of ADCOMs WRT engineers, not the reality of the situation regarding the social adeptness of practicing doctors) and really enjoy working with people, which is something that you genrally don't get to do very much as an engineer. Sure, you can go into management, but then you are turning your back on all of the good stuff that is part of engineering. Medicine is a career where you get to apply science to solving real-world problems (like engineering) but get to work with people (as an integral part of your job) at the same time. I have many more reasons than I have time right now, but that's one of the big reasons.
 

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engdoc said:
thanks.. anyways my main concern here is... will pre-med/bio pre meds have an advantage over me when we start med school... since i know bolts and screws and they know more related things
I was an engineering major in undergrad and grad.

I have taken only the bare minimum pre-med courses.

I took Biology 1, 2 in the early 90s. I took Biology 2 in 2000. (It was really 3, but the school switched from quarters to semesters, so Biology 1 was partly the old 1 and 2, and Biology 2 was partly the old 2 and 3.) My Chemistry background is the same, but I got a bunch of upper level chemEng classes which really had very little to do with the chem on the MCAT or medicine.

Anyway, am I at a disadvantage??

Ask me in a couple of months. ;)
 

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I'd say you're golden. If you get an essay about "a time you interacted with people from different backgrounds" you could write about "that time I talked to a girl".
 

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maestro1625 said:
I'd say you're golden. If you get an essay about "a time you interacted with people from different backgrounds" you could write about "that time I talked to a girl".
The mighty socially inept engineering stereotype
 

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If you decide on Orthopedics in the future.... the Engineering degree will be golden.
 

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Robizzle said:
really? could u please explain this?
(because i am engineering and am also interested in orthopedics)
Of the two of the ortho guys I work with, one had degrees in BME and the other was engineering in ugrad until he went pre med. (As an aside, he said he made the change because he wanted to something easier!)

This last week I spent a morning in the OR with the orthopods. Every other word was 'biomechanics.'

Another good place for engineers in medicine is rehab medicine. They're doing some cool things with prosthetics and orthotics.
 
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jota_jota said:
...I can't really comment about the difficulty of upper-division chemistry classes, as I haven't taken anything higher-level than O-chem and Biochemistry, both of which I found to be a piece-of-cake compared to any of my Engineering classes...
In my experience, P-Chem, Surface Chemistry (both upper-level ugrad chem classes), and graduate Analytical, Inorganic, Organic, and P-Chem classes required little time and effort compared to ugrad engineering classes like Mass Transfer, Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, and Reaction Kinetics and Reactor Design.
jota_jota said:
...Medicine is a career where you get to apply science to solving real-world problems (like engineering) but get to work with people (as an integral part of your job) at the same time.
Exactly. There's nothing like seeing one of your patients a year later (after surgery and PT) and seeing them doing better than you could have imagined.
 

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jota_jota said:
...I haven't taken anything higher-level than O-chem and Biochemistry, both of which I found to be a piece-of-cake compared to any of my Engineering classes.

...Medicine is a career where you get to apply science to solving real-world problems (like engineering) but get to work with people (as an integral part of your job) at the same time...
I could not have said either point better myself.
 

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Hey, even engineers have their own extensive fields in medicine. You, as a doctor, could even advise other non-engy doctors how prosthetics work, for example, and whether certain medical devices are feasible or practical. Medicine isn't just for bio majors. In fact, almost every major has a link to medicine, I believe.
 

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Compass said:
Hey, even engineers have their own extensive fields in medicine. You, as a doctor, could even advise other non-engy doctors how prosthetics work, for example, and whether certain medical devices are feasible or practical. Medicine isn't just for bio majors. In fact, almost every major has a link to medicine, I believe.
my father is a quality engineer at a NPO tissue bank. His education background had nothing to do with medicine or biology. In his company, an MD comes in every now and then for consultation...not exactly sure what he does, but according to my dad its very important to the company.

So to add to what you said, there are definetly fields where an engineering-oriented doctor is a hot commodity
 

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RxnMan said:
In my experience, P-Chem, Surface Chemistry (both upper-level ugrad chem classes), and graduate Analytical, Inorganic, Organic, and P-Chem classes required little time and effort compared to ugrad engineering classes like Mass Transfer, Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, and Reaction Kinetics and Reactor Design.
Amen to that!!! Reaction kinetics and material and energy balances were tiring courses!!!
 

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Compass said:
Hey, even engineers have their own extensive fields in medicine. You, as a doctor, could even advise other non-engy doctors how prosthetics work, for example, and whether certain medical devices are feasible or practical.
Definetly agree!!! Engineering practical work speaks volumes!!! Include to that list the mechanism to dialysis and medical imaging!
 

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BioMedEngineer said:
Definetly agree!!! Engineering practical work speaks volumes!!! Include to that list the mechanism to dialysis and medical imaging!
It's true. I know how both of those work. Dialysis from biotransport phenomena, and medical imaging from medical imaging!
 
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engdoc

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TauPathology said:
I've had admissions councilors tell me that they like students from any background besides engineering.
why is that?
 
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engdoc

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TauPathology said:
I don't know about your school... But any chemistry major is about on par with engineering at UF. With that said, chemistry does give you the option to not take the absolute hardest classes, while engineering doesnt have that type of luxury.

What was your thinking in deciding to go to med school instead of an engineering career?(curiosity only) Its a big difference in school and salary for a long time.
well there are alot of reasons... here is my story:
even since i was a little lad i wanted to be a doctor... as i grew up though i started to love cars and mechanical machines... i was afraid to take bio in univ then not get into med school and be stuck with a bio degree...(at that time i thought they could only teach) so i made a decition to persue my other love... cars .. so i went into mechanical engineering... now i'm over have done my degree... and i still have noises in my head telling me that becoming a doctor is still my dream....
 
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DrZaius said:
The mighty socially inept engineering stereotype
there is 3 girls in my year... (started at about 300)...
one is an engineering *****
the other is too hot
and one is ugly

oooooooooooooo yea
 
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engdoc said:
there is 3 girls in my year... (started at about 300)...
one is an engineering *****
the other is too hot
and one is ugly

oooooooooooooo yea
At my school, maybe half the biomedical engineers are girls :cool:
 

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DrZaius said:
At my school, maybe half the biomedical engineers are girls :cool:

ditto...BME is pretty appealing to girls for some reason (more so than other engineering fields)
 

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BMEkid09 said:
ditto...BME is pretty appealing to girls for some reason (more so than other engineering fields)
I don't remember the study reference, but it was shown that women rarely go into the sciences, engineering especially, unless they have a personal contact (uncle, mother, brother) who is in the field and introduces them to it. The study went further to show that the reason why engineering is not intrinsically appealing to women is not because of the difficulty, but the fact that the effect on people was not immediately apparent. BME is a field defined by applying engineering to human problems. The benefit to people is apparent in BME. QED
 

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engdoc said:
there is 3 girls in my year... (started at about 300)...
We always likened the ladies n my school to parking spaces. They're either taken, handicapped, or way the hell out there.

Of course, the ladies (men:women was 4:1) countered with the odds were good, but the goods were odd.
 

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Am I too late for the engineer circle jerk party? :cool:
 

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RxnMan said:
We always likened the ladies n my school to parking spaces. They're either taken, handicapped, or way the hell out there.

Of course, the ladies (men:women was 4:1) countered with the odds were good, but the goods were odd.
I don't think those things are limited to engineering....

Dallenoff said:
Am I too late for the engineer circle jerk party? :cool:
Hell no. Welcome!
 

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RxnMan said:
We always likened the ladies n my school to parking spaces. They're either taken, handicapped, or way the hell out there.

Of course, the ladies (men:women was 4:1) countered with the odds were good, but the goods were odd.
You sound like you go to GA Tech. Most of my best friends from HS went to GA Tech....and none of them are dating anyone. lol. And the girls complain that despite the good odds, they can't find a guy who wants to leave his World of Warcraft game. Everyone's screwed!

A guy at Tech made this site. It's hilarious, especially the part about "Tech goggles." :laugh:
 

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MilkofAmnesia said:
Everyone's screwed!
If that was the case, then we'd all be happier during ugrad and websites like your friend's wouldn't exist! :)
MilkofAmnesia said:
It's hilarious, especially the part about "Tech goggles." :laugh:
We always joked about 'Mines Goggles.'
 

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Hmmm....I've heard of Berkley-vision.
 

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engdoc said:
thanks.. anyways my main concern here is... will pre-med/bio pre meds have an advantage over me when we start med school... since i know bolts and screws and they know more related things
I was an engineer at a large public university for undergrad. I'm now at a top 10 medical school.
Engineering was much more difficult than the first 2 years of medical school. First year med school was fantastic--I hadn't had that much free time since high school! Even second year was easier than any year in college. Studying for the boards was so much nicer than trying to study for the MCAT while taking 17 credit hours of engineering classes. Third and fourth year are just different, so it's hard to compare; they are more about getting along with others than about knowledge (at least relatively).

Although you don't have much biology background, the "knowing how to learn" aspect of engineering is huge, I think. Also, I think you have to be pretty smart to get a good enough GPA in engineering to get in to med school (but I suppose I may be a bit biased ;) ) My guess is that once in, YOU will have the advantage in medical school. Enjoy!
 

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BozoSparky said:
personally, i think the first year of medical school is much easier to swallow for students who have taken biochemistry, microbiology, etc. sure, you will be capable of understanding anything they throw at you, but it's the speed and volume of material covered that makes it hard...so seeing it once before helps, in my opinion.

I absolutely agree with this. I was a lawyer prior to medical school and a number of people in the class had different backgrounds including engineering. The engineers I know have split on how they are doing. I hated M1. Do yourself a huge favor, take anatomy, physio, biochem and immuno. You will thank us later.
 
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sweet...thats what i have always throught... engineering involves a large volume of work and also rather difficult work.. so i think in terms of "knowing how to study " i think i have that in the bag... now! i'm not socially inept ... i'm actaully really outgoing and if you could meet me i think you would like me... now! the how do i prove to an adcome that i'm cool :cool: not a nerd :idea: ALSO... anyone heard of the university of windsor ... its in canada.. just want to get a general census of people's knowledge... cheers :sleep:
 

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Zombie thread, but I had to chime in with "Case Goggles"
:laugh: :laugh:

I crushed my Case goggles into a million tiny pieces. Come to the outside world. It's better here, relatively speaking.

PS. Try getting lost in the nursing school building or Peter B. Lewis building or the art museum. Only mildly awesome, but better than what we've been exposed to in friggin ENGR *** classes.
 

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bioengineering has definitely been traumatizing, but it has also been incredibly interesting. no bio classes offer the opportunity to delve into the in-depth mechanics of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. every week, we are assigned design problems to formulate treatments and methods of detection for various diseases. i'm like a walking posterboard for bioengineering, but it really is fascinating.
 
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