Nov 26, 2013
19
0
Status
Medical Student
I was recently accepted into US MD medical school with a full-ride scholarship. I am a non-trad, I graduated ~8 years ago with a 3.7+ sGPA/cGPA in Biochem. I got a below 30 on my MCATs. I really see myself in the health care/medical field keep on hearing different things about medical school. I like research, I want to be able to provide care and hopefully teach one day.

I keep on hearing different things about medical school. The thing that really concerns me the most is the amount of volume that medical school is and standardized tests. I am a very meticulous learner. I would really go through the material in undergrad and make sure that I understood/memorized it. By going to lectures, reading the textbook cover to cover and annotating class notes. I am not the fastest reader either. I heard that in medical school I wont have time to do all of this and I heard that undergrads can differ in difficulty and I do not know if mine was particularly difficult. My school allowed us to take a maximum of 18 credits which I pretty much did every semester.

I have taken a couple graduate level courses since then a Biostats course which was kinda easy (got an A- and an A) and a Neuroanatomy course (without lab) which I probably got a B or A- in partly because I do not think I really put in the adequate amount of time but I found the majority of the information fascinating and I was sort of taking it to help me prepare for medical school. I am left with so many questions and I wish I studied/memorized the material in more depth.

I have always been a hard worker and I enjoy studying and learning. I can get overwhelmed easily though which makes me nervous. This was not an issue in undergrad but once again the material was probably easier, etc. Since graduating undergrad, life stresses have caused me to have a few panic attacks. I really need to be able to control my stress and I am afraid that if I am not able to keep up in medical school I will get too anxious and stressed out.

Also, I feel like I need more time on exams than most people. I always took the longest on my college tests. Timing was a big factor with my MCAT. Sometimes I could manage though. If people have a justified medical condition, could they get extra time on exams?

I really do not want to set myself up to fail. Of course, I think I was super nervous about not being able to handle the rigors of undergrad and I did just fine.

What should I do? This is the opportunity of a life-time but I don't want to fail or die in the process. The school has a summer pre-matriculation program. I was thinking of doing it to help me prepare for medical school, I really want to be on top of my game, but a lot of people are telling me that I should just enjoy my last summer of freedom. Although, I know that there is a summer between M1 and M2.

Am I stressing out over nothing? Will I be able to handle the rigors of medical school? Should I consider another path? Should I do the summer pre-matriculation program?
 
Last edited:

Aerus

Elemental Alchemist
7+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2012
3,222
2,368
Status
Medical Student
Countless people have done it before you. You can do it. =)

If you're only scared of failing out, there is a saying that goes "If you don't want to fail, you won't." Med schools lose a lot of money if they fail a student so they'll try really hard to make sure you don't fail.
 
Oct 19, 2013
900
791
Status
Pharmacy Student
I will say that adcoms invest a lot of time and energy into picking people that they believe have the ability to succeed. I think you need to decide if it's the anxiety that you're most scared of or if it's failure. If it's stress, you should honestly think about how far you're willing to push yourself for this and if you have the coping skills to make it through without being miserable and resentful. If it's failure, I say go for it. They wouldn't have let you in if you couldn't hack it. This is just my personal opinion.
 

calvnandhobbs68

I KNOW NOTHING
7+ Year Member
May 20, 2010
3,271
1,288
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
This is the opportunity of a life-time but I don't want to fail or die in the process.
Calm down there drama queen.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lilronron
Oct 19, 2013
900
791
Status
Pharmacy Student
If you do decide to go, I'd seriously consider the pre-matriculation program. Those who say to just enjoy your last summer may have a completely different perspective. From the sound of your post though, giving up the summer of freedom could very well be the boost of confidence you need and having just that little teensy bit of perceived control over the situation (real or imagined) could be what keeps you sane during the transition. I wish you the best of luck. Take a second to just be proud of yourself. Whatever you decide, you accomplished something amazing already. A FULL RIDE to med school? Holla! :D
 
Oct 16, 2012
53
3
Status
I had very similar thoughts. Although I was more worried about the clinical side of being a doctor and med school (not the taking tests).

Let's put it this way. People who's jobs it is to determine who would be successful at their program thought that you would be a perfect fit for them. They have been doing this for years and have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly and yet they still wanted you. I think that they know what they're doing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lilronron

IncognitoGuy

life of leisure
7+ Year Member
Jun 24, 2011
3,280
878
Status
Resident [Any Field]
P = MD
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
52,683
76,450
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
All new endeavors are fraught with anxiety. You'll be fine. If the anxiety becomes too much, go see a therapist.

In the mean time, bone up on some anatomy texts and hit the ground running!
 
  • Like
Reactions: lilronron

cbarne01

5+ Year Member
Nov 20, 2012
98
14
Guelph, Ontario
Status
Veterinary Student
Remember that there will be a LOT of support once you start - peer helpers, tutors and profs are all there to help you do well.
You might also consider looking into your school's equivalent of a centre for students with disabilities if you think you might have a learning disability that was never diagnosed (or a meeting with them the talk about it). Taking longer on tests and reading slowly are common signs that might lead to accommodation if you have a diagnosed learning disability.
Good luck & don't over think it!
 
  • Like
Reactions: lilronron

Awesome Sauceome

SDN Gold Donor
Gold Donor
5+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2013
3,123
2,703
In a pine tree
Status
Non-Student
seriously since no one else has mentioned it. A huge congrats for getting into a school with a full ride, thats so awesome!
 
  • Like
Reactions: lilronron

xroc

7+ Year Member
Sep 8, 2011
314
84
Status
Medical Student
I know this is probably the wrong mentality to go in with, but since you're not paying for tuition, the worst-case scenario is you lose some time. Some people drop out and carry thousands or hundreds of thousands of non-dischargeable debt over their heads ...
 
OP
L
Nov 26, 2013
19
0
Status
Medical Student
I know this is probably the wrong mentality to go in with, but since you're not paying for tuition, the worst-case scenario is you lose some time. Some people drop out and carry thousands or hundreds of thousands of non-dischargeable debt over their heads ...
I do not know if that is 100% true. I would anticipate that I might owe back what I did do. There are contingencies to a lot of scholarships, but yeah. I will not know until I try. :)
 
Last edited:
OP
L
Nov 26, 2013
19
0
Status
Medical Student
Remember that there will be a LOT of support once you start - peer helpers, tutors and profs are all there to help you do well.
You might also consider looking into your school's equivalent of a centre for students with disabilities if you think you might have a learning disability that was never diagnosed (or a meeting with them the talk about it). Taking longer on tests and reading slowly are common signs that might lead to accommodation if you have a diagnosed learning disability.
Good luck & don't over think it!
Do all medical schools have a center for students with disabilities? What resources are available to them?
 

IgEdoc

5+ Year Member
Jul 19, 2013
121
184
California
Status
Attending Physician
Sounds like you have had enough success in your studies that med school should be fine. Do you have any ADHD?
The one big advice from a professor I carried with me on graduating med school and throughout my career was "don't expect to know everything, but expect to know where to find the answers"
 

lobo.solo

7+ Year Member
May 4, 2011
1,952
119
Status
Medical Student
Good for you OP. Just stay thirsty and keep your eyes on the prize. A lot of people say that med school is all about hard work and you're in control of that, so you should be fine. GL.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bambam92
Apr 12, 2012
1,081
472
Earth
Status
Non-Student
I am the same way with regards to reading and studying from a textbook. My style is to try to think of the applications, interpret the figures, and think about how the situation would change given a change in X or Y variable. As such, my studying was more involved and longer than that of many pre-med students. (I'm not a medical student, so I can only speak to undergraduate and graduate level classes that I took while in college). My strategy was to always buy my textbooks in advance whenever possible and read them ahead of time. Contact your medical school and see if you can purchase the books from them or locate them online. You can give yourself a head start. There are also some awesome study links and reference sites posted in one of the sticky threads on the allopathic medicine forum. I would check those out.

If your school doesn't have the textbook list, see if you can buy them from a MS-2. Even if the books are slightly dated (i.e. a new edition comes out), the information is unlikely to change drastically and you can at least have some base line knowledge when going in.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lilronron

Santana90

Membership Revoked
Removed
Account on Hold
Nov 22, 2013
54
38
I was recently accepted into US MD medical school with a full-ride scholarship. I am a non-trad, I graduated ~8 years ago with a 3.78 sGPA/cGPA in Biochem. I got a 27 (9PS, 8VR, 10BS) on my MCATs. I really see myself in the health care/medical field keep on hearing different things about medical school. I like research, I want to be able to provide care and hopefully teach one day.

I keep on hearing different things about medical school. The thing that really concerns me the most is the amount of volume that medical school is and standardized tests. I am a very meticulous learner. I would really go through the material in undergrad and make sure that I understood/memorized it. By going to lectures, reading the textbook cover to cover and annotating class notes. I am not the fastest reader either. I heard that in medical school I wont have time to do all of this and I heard that undergrads can differ in difficulty and I do not know if mine was particularly difficult. My school allowed us to take a maximum of 18 credits which I pretty much did every semester.

I have taken a couple graduate level courses since then a Biostats course which was kinda easy (got an A- and an A) and a Neuroanatomy course (without lab) which I probably got a B or A- in partly because I do not think I really put in the adequate amount of time but I found the majority of the information fascinating and I was sort of taking it to help me prepare for medical school. I am left with so many questions and I wish I studied/memorized the material in more depth.

I have always been a hard worker and I enjoy studying and learning. I can get overwhelmed easily though which makes me nervous. This was not an issue in undergrad but once again the material was probably easier, etc. Since graduating undergrad, life stresses have caused me to have a few panic attacks. I really need to be able to control my stress and I am afraid that if I am not able to keep up in medical school I will get too anxious and stressed out.

Also, I feel like I need more time on exams than most people. I always took the longest on my college tests. Timing was a big factor with my MCAT. Sometimes I could manage though. If people have a justified medical condition, could they get extra time on exams?

I really do not want to set myself up to fail. Of course, I think I was super nervous about not being able to handle the rigors of undergrad and I did just fine.

What should I do? This is the opportunity of a life-time but I don't want to fail or die in the process. The school has a summer pre-matriculation program. I was thinking of doing it to help me prepare for medical school, I really want to be on top of my game, but a lot of people are telling me that I should just enjoy my last summer of freedom. Although, I know that there is a summer between M1 and M2.

Am I stressing out over nothing? Will I be able to handle the rigors of medical school? Should I consider another path? Should I do the summer pre-matriculation program?
What medical school?

Congrats tinylilron! Just believe in yourself :)
 

sonofva

7+ Year Member
Aug 31, 2009
1,066
384
Status
Attending Physician
dude you have a free ride! just take it and run.
 

cbarne01

5+ Year Member
Nov 20, 2012
98
14
Guelph, Ontario
Status
Veterinary Student
Do all medical schools have a center for students with disabilities? What resources are available to them?
There is some sort of similar program at every school but the resources and depth of assistance might vary. Accommodations that are common are more time or a quiet space for tests or assignments, lecture recordings if the school doesn't already make them available, increased access to lecture slides, etc. Each accommodation is targeted for the specific student so diagnosis is required ahead of time. I know someone who works at a centre like this and she says that students should contact the school several months before school starts to set up a meeting if they feel that they might qualify. Its worth looking into.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lilronron
OP
L
Nov 26, 2013
19
0
Status
Medical Student
There is some sort of similar program at every school but the resources and depth of assistance might vary. Accommodations that are common are more time or a quiet space for tests or assignments, lecture recordings if the school doesn't already make them available, increased access to lecture slides, etc. Each accommodation is targeted for the specific student so diagnosis is required ahead of time. I know someone who works at a centre like this and she says that students should contact the school several months before school starts to set up a meeting if they feel that they might qualify. Its worth looking into.
Thank you.
 

NoPeace

Membership Revoked
Removed
Account on Hold
Dec 13, 2013
3
1
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Am I stressing out over nothing? Will I be able to handle the rigors of medical school? Should I consider another path? Should I do the summer pre-matriculation program?
Yes. No. Yes - dishwashing. Sure.

Hope that helped. Gl.
 

gettheleadout

MS-4
Moderator Emeritus
7+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2010
11,814
2,783
Status
Medical Student

Theralist

5+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2013
29
14
Status
Pre-Medical
If you're only scared of failing out, there is a saying that goes "If you don't want to fail, you won't." Med schools lose a lot of money if they fail a student so they'll try really hard to make sure you don't fail.
This is so true. I was told by a resident that "the hardest part of medical school is getting in." They really don't want to lose people. Just work hard and you'll be fine. If it helps, I found out I just got in two weeks ago so I'll be in the same boat as you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lilronron