Gleevec

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Hi guys,
I was just wondering if people have had problems similar to mine, and if so, if ya'll have any ideas on how to fix it. I'm in an anatomy class right now, and though its quite interesting, I'm having trouble retaining information over the long-run. In fact, the only parts of anatomy I really remember are when things go wrong... ie clinical issues (I have enormous difficulty in remembering "pure anatomy" concepts, like most muscle origins/insertions for longer than a week).

Ive tried studying for a longer period of time, but it just seems as if I forget a lot of the details almost as soon as I read them. Should I just be content to remember in the long run when "things go wrong" with anatomy, and should I bother with the minutiae. I know that the details are what seperate the best students from the average students, but at this point, I would rather just remember something in the long-term.

Thanks!
 

Seaglass

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Try making drawings and some mnemonics. You need to create a process where the information goes in, comes out, and goes back in in a different way.

C
 
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goobernaculum

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i agree that the minutiae isn't important. just hold onto your netter or rohen and use it as a reference. the important stuff you'll pound into your head over and over again.
 

babinski bob

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anatomy is pretty worthless IMHO unless you're going into surgery. Who really needs to know all that detail anyway? Understanding pathophysiology is so much more important to becoming a competent clinician than knowing which nerves innervate what muscle, blah blah blah...
 

Tranquility

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Glad to know I'm not alone...but I find that in Anatomy 2...(the physiology portion) things seem to start to make more sence.....
But as for bones and muscles and all that fun stuff...well..I just leave that to the experts!
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by Tranquility
Glad to know I'm not alone...but I find that in Anatomy 2...(the physiology portion) things seem to start to make more sence.....
But as for bones and muscles and all that fun stuff...well..I just leave that to the experts!

First off, thanks for all the helpful replies, I really appreciate all the different comments that were made, seeing as I know little about the importance of what Im studying at this point.

Anatomy is unique in that out of all my classes in undergrad, this is the first one where I consistently forget material within a week or so of being covered. Sometimes it just feels as if Im starting at drawings with meaningless words on them, and pages full of text describing muscles, insertions, origins, innervations. Physiology makes a lot more sense to me because its a pathway/mechanism (like Bohr effect or even the nephron, which though pretty complex, I feel is pretty logical when I focus on it for long enough), while in anatomy it seems as if im just "lost in the nomeclature", if that makes any sense. Kinda like a bunch of disconnected words floating around in my mind, even when I learn things by compartments.

Ah well, I guess the only thing to do is just brute force it. I definitely try to use mnemonics as much as I can, but I feel my dependency on them is just killing any chance of me learning anything in the long-term. I would prefer a more elegant or logical approach, but I just cant seem to find the underlying logic behind the way the body is organized.

I guess Im just kinda frustrated since I feel really lost in the material, but thanks for all the suggestions. I really appreciate it!

Gleevec
 

Tranquility

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I feel kinda disappointed b/c my anatomy class is a joke. I got an A last semester because the professor gives NO in class tests, no homework, lab is stupid....and one Slide project. Its ridiculous. Do I appreciate the easy A? Of course! I would be crazy if I didnt!
But.....It kinda stinks that I'm not really learning anything and i know its probably gonna bite me in the butt later....=(
 

Gleevec

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Dont feel disappointed, my anatomy class is the opposite and I dont feel like Im gaining that much. A long time ago I asked on Allo whether I should take anatomy or something else, and a lot of people said something else, I should have listened to them. But nooooo I had to be naive and overzealous. Ah well, if anything, at least I am gaining familiarity with stuff. But I think everyone who said I should have taken something else was absolutely right, too bad I was too dumb to take their intelligent advice.

Originally posted by Tranquility
I feel kinda disappointed b/c my anatomy class is a joke. I got an A last semester because the professor gives NO in class tests, no homework, lab is stupid....and one Slide project. Its ridiculous. Do I appreciate the easy A? Of course! I would be crazy if I didnt!
But.....It kinda stinks that I'm not really learning anything and i know its probably gonna bite me in the butt later....=(
 

Whisker Barrel Cortex

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Anatomy is very important in surgery and radiology, but not in other specialties. Much of the detailed anatomy I learned in 1st year has long since forgotten, but as I go through the different modalities of radiology, I have had to review much of it. I'm glad learned it in the first place since reviewing is so much better than learning the first time. Eventually it sticks.

I'd probably say that you need more anatomy in radiology than in any other specialty since we must know the anatomy of the entire body in a great deal of detail, not just a certain portion of the body as surgeons do.

All that being said, I was an average student at gross anatomy and am doing fine in radiology.
 

luckirabbit

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I'm impressed gleevec that you have taken the time to study anatomy. Just take it one step at a time instead of the whole thing at once. It may make it easier.
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by luckirabbit
I'm impressed gleevec that you have taken the time to study anatomy. Just take it one step at a time instead of the whole thing at once. It may make it easier.

Thanks, right now Im just trying to survive though =)
 
8

8744

Keep an atlas in your locker during thid and fourth year. Before going to any surgery cram for about five minutes on the relevant area. You'll do fine.
 

carrigallen

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From the limited amount I have experienced talking to physicians and shadowing them (in certain fields), the talk about anatomy being "superflous" is utter hogwash.

Personally, I wish I remembered the minutae from my anatomy class. If you are at all interested in procedural disciplines, then REMEMBER YOUR ANATOMY! You will be asked about the 7 fascal planes of the neck...the cluneal nerves...the cartilages of the larygnx. At least I have, and I have been shadowing only a few doctors.

I bought the bs that anatomy details were not important, so I just crammed for the test and forgot it. Now I regret it..anatomy is one of the most interesting classes, and unlike other classes it is unique. The material you learn here will never be repeated, and in a way it is the detailed knowledge of anatomy which makes being a physician special.
 

DoctorDoom

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Gleevec, try to relate the innervation and muscles origins/insertions to normal function and also to orthopedic pathology. What does the muscle do? why is that function important? what motion does it allow you to perform? what happens to an athlete when that muscle is affected? I found that to be really helpful when trying to remember anatomical minutiae. For example, when thinking about the muscles of the shoulder, I would lift my arm and make a motion, imagine the location and function of a specific muscle, etc. Then I would compare it to related muscles in other animals, like the frog. The 3D conceptualization and relation to function and other species helped a lot. It also made the repitition less dreary.

Hope that helps!
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by DoctorDoom
Gleevec, try to relate the innervation and muscles origins/insertions to normal function and also to orthopedic pathology. What does the muscle do? why is that function important? what motion does it allow you to perform? what happens to an athlete when that muscle is affected? I found that to be really helpful when trying to remember anatomical minutiae. For example, when thinking about the muscles of the shoulder, I would lift my arm and make a motion, imagine the location and function of a specific muscle, etc. Then I would compare it to related muscles in other animals, like the frog. The 3D conceptualization and relation to function and other species helped a lot. It also made the repitition less dreary.

Hope that helps!

Thanks for the info! I definitely use my own body to remember a lot of the muscles and bones and whatnot. I guess I just need to keep at it.
 

CYP2E1

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You need a system for the long term

Most of the minutia can be remembered if you have an easy system.

Hear is my 2c

1. Get a proper anatomy book (Like Last's ? written for surgeons) don't waste your money on Moore, Snell etc which present the information as a nebulous blob.

2. Use Netter's, Rohan, Grants or McMinn?s for the pictures.

3. Use the setup in Lasts to remember your musculature etc. Remember your embryology compartmentalisation. Once you have this all of the anatomy stays together and does not seem so ephemeral

For example.
Anterior compartment of the arm. Know which mm?s it contains and then you know that the musculocutaneus nn innervates this compartment (3 mm taken care of)

You should not try to remember that pronator quadratus is innervated by the anterior interosseus division of the median nn but rather learn that the flexor compartments of the arm and forearm is generally innevervated by a nn starting with M (arm = musculocut, forearm = median)

The mnemonic is then FM ER (flexors are innervated by m nerves extensors by the R nerve)

A similar system applies to origins/insertions (remember to think about function/action) and BS.

Now of course there are exceptions (eg FCU, FDP) but once you have a system to take care of the bulk the exceptions are easily remembered.

You can also use this approach for visceral anatomy

HTH
 

Doc Ivy

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I totally agree with the above poster... so much of this stuff can be compartmentalized and then you only have "chunks" of stuff to memorize (especially muscles and nerves)

For example regardless of what nerve they get all the rotator cuff muscles have C5 C6 nerve roots. Now you just have to know the rotator cuff and you're good to go for 4 muscles... This approach also makes exceptions to the rule (which profs love to use on MC type exam questions) a lot easier to remember

But can somebody any body tell me why adductor pollicis is innervated by the ulnar nerve!!!
:confused: :rolleyes: ;)

~doc
 

DoctorDoom

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Originally posted by Doc Ivy
But can somebody any body tell me why adductor pollicis is innervated by the ulnar nerve!!!
:confused: :rolleyes: ;)

~doc

Look at its origin! It pulls the thumb to the ulnar area!

At least that's how I remembered it...
 
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