yessirMD

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So I was reading the UCLA School of Medicine website and it says that courses that overlap with subject matter in the School of Medicine is not recommended. I JUST finished A&P I. Why wouldn't they want pre-medical or post-baccalaureate students to get a head start?
 

mommy2three

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Because many schools have a particular way they want you to learn it and feel that if you have it before you enter that it will interfere with their teaching methods
I took it in undergrad as well and it helped for about the first week
 
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yessirMD

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Does that mean I should stay away from classes such as histology, embryology, and immunology?

Planning to take A/P II and virology next quarter.
 

theseeker4

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Does that mean I should stay away from classes such as histology, embryology, and immunology?

Planning to take A/P II and virology next quarter.
I would focus more on things like biochem, genetics, etc. myself. Undergrad versions of the med school classes are hit or miss regarding how useful they are. I don't think taking them will hurt your chances at all, but definitely don't expect taking them to give you any real advantage at all once you start med school.
 
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wholeheartedly

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Also, since those classes aren't likely to give you much of a leg up according to most around here, schools might just be saying to spend your money on something else that interests you instead since you'll be devoting the rest of your education/career to science.
 

Chip N Sawbones

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If nothing else, anatomy would be useful just so you get the vocabulary down. Undergrad science classes might not help all that much, but every little bit they do help counts. I wish I could have taken more before I started med school. I wouldn't recommend taking more science classes if it's going to hurt your GPA or delay med school, but taking them as electives will be a small benefit when you start med school.
 
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yessirMD

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I wouldn't recommend taking more science classes if it's going to hurt your GPA or delay med school, but taking them as electives will be a small benefit when you start med school.
Lots of people here would beg to differ? Don't they say a heavy science course load is what it takes to get into medical school if you don't have the GPA?
 

Chip N Sawbones

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I mean that if you can't get good grades in science classes, don't take them. Your chances of getting into med school will be higher if you have the minimum prerequisites rather than lots of science classes in which you got B's and C's. Of course, if you can't get A's in undergrad science classes you should probably reconsider med school entirely. At least at my school, biochem alone takes more work than undergrad organic, physics, and biology did combined.
 

QofQuimica

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I didn't take anatomy before med school, and I'm glad of it. It was boring and painful enough going through it once. Who'd want to do it twice? Plus, you'll forget it all and have to re-memorize it again in med school anyway. Just being familiar with the words isn't particularly useful; you have to be familiar with the body itself in order to get through gross anatomy. Now physiology on the other hand was interesting, and it would have been worth a second go-round if I could have done it. So if you're going to take biomed science classes in college, I'd suggest sticking to subjects like phys where what you learn can provide a conceptual foundation for what you'll learn in med school. Don't waste your time pumping and dumping anatomy terms.

(On a side note, it amazes me that it's possible to get a PhD in anatomy. Can't imagine what these people do research on while they're in grad school!)
 
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theseeker4

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Lots of people here would beg to differ? Don't they say a heavy science course load is what it takes to get into medical school if you don't have the GPA?
A heavy course load of A's in science courses can make up for poor early undergraduate performance. A bunch of lower grades in science courses will only hurt someone's chances at admission, not help.
 
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yessirMD

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A heavy course load of A's in science courses can make up for poor early undergraduate performance. A bunch of lower grades in science courses will only hurt someone's chances at admission, not help.
Well yeah, that does without saying? I got an A this past fall quarter. Just wondering why it's not recommended even if a student were to get an A in the class.
 

theseeker4

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Well yeah, that does without saying? I got an A this past fall quarter. Just wondering why it's not recommended even if a student were to get an A in the class.
Just as mentioned above, not recommended because the schools don't think you need those specific courses before you start school. Don't read that as if taking them will hurt you at all, they just are not recommending them.
 
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yessirMD

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Just as mentioned above, not recommended because the schools don't think you need those specific courses before you start school. Don't read that as if taking them will hurt you at all, they just are not recommending them.
That makes sense because many pre medical students major in physiology. And anatomy is required for that.
 
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(On a side note, it amazes me that it's possible to get a PhD in anatomy. Can't imagine what these people do research on while they're in grad school!)
When I took anatomy in undergrad the professor said that people almost never get their PhD in just Anatomy anymore. It's always a type of Anatomy PhD, he had his PhD in Physical Anthropology.

I agree with you, though. I really enjoyed my anatomy class in undergrad, learning everything was a lot of fun. But, I already forgot a lot of the specifics; but I still remember bigger picture things. As everyone is saying, I'm sure it won't help me any in med school. A big thing anatomy did for me in undergrad is get me excited for getting a much more in depth understanding of it in med school. BUT, I am probably just having pre medical school limbo land delusions right now :rolleyes:
 

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So I was reading the UCLA School of Medicine website and it says that courses that overlap with subject matter in the School of Medicine is not recommended. I JUST finished A&P I. Why wouldn't they want pre-medical or post-baccalaureate students to get a head start?
Because you learn all of that in medical school, but the other courses that are taught in undergrad institutions are things that they cannot teach you. From courses in botany to art history to a foreign language/lit/politics, you can gain insights and information that will help you at some point make a better connection or find commonality with another person (colleague or patient), understand where he/she is coming from, or more appropriately interact with him/her. This may not be based simply on the coursework, but also on meeting and interacting in those courses with students and instructors who aren't of our ilk.

Educated people easily frown upon lacking the curiosity to travel or try new activities, yet so many of us set our sights on an academic target and head straight for it, missing so many things life can offer if you take the little detours. It's a shame.
 

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