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Another immunology question

MoosePilot

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    Ok, I'm doing a correspondence course in Immunology. I've got a question I can't find a place to get a good start on. Anyone want to help?

    "A mouse is immunized with bovine serum albumin. What populations of lymphocytes in peripheral lymph nodes would be affected and how? What would happen if instead of being given bovine serum albumin, the mouse was infected with measles virus? How would these responses be affected by neonatal thymectomy? How would they be affected by thymectomy of an adult mouse?"

    The last two questions I feel like I've got a handle on. It's what the specific immune response would be to BSA and to measles virus that's got me stumped. If I knew where to read that, I'd be fine.
     

    Treg

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      MoosePilot said:
      Ok, I'm doing a correspondence course in Immunology. I've got a question I can't find a place to get a good start on. Anyone want to help?

      "A mouse is immunized with bovine serum albumin. What populations of lymphocytes in peripheral lymph nodes would be affected and how? What would happen if instead of being given bovine serum albumin, the mouse was infected with measles virus? How would these responses be affected by neonatal thymectomy? How would they be affected by thymectomy of an adult mouse?"

      The last two questions I feel like I've got a handle on. It's what the specific immune response would be to BSE and to measles virus that's got me stumped. If I knew where to read that, I'd be fine.

      BSA would be an extracellular antigen, so it would elicit a B-cell response (antibody mediated). Viruses infect cells, and viral antigens are subsequently expressed in the context of MHC-1 on the surface; hence, they elicit a T-cell mediated response. If you thymectomize the mouse at birth, they will not be able to develop adequate T-cell mediated immunity, since the T-cells undergo positive and negative selection there. Thus, immunity to viral infection would be compromised. However, B-cells should still function properly.

      I hope that helps. Now you owe me ;)

      Treg (do you know what my name means now that you are taking immuno?)
       

      MoosePilot

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        Treg said:
        BSA would be an extracellular antigen, so it would elicit a B-cell response (antibody mediated). Viruses infect cells, and viral antigens are subsequently expressed in the context of MHC-1 on the surface; hence, they elicit a T-cell mediated response. If you thymectomize the mouse at birth, they will not be able to develop adequate T-cell mediated immunity, since the T-cells undergo positive and negative selection there. Thus, immunity to viral infection would be compromised. However, B-cells should still function properly.

        I hope that helps. Now you owe me ;)

        Treg (do you know what my name means now that you are taking immuno?)

        Ok, that helps.

        I haven't gotten to that point in the course, but google leads to T-regulatory cells. Can get switched off by HIV, causing T cells to proliferate...
         
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        SanDiegoSOD

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          Treg said:
          BSA would be an extracellular antigen, so it would elicit a B-cell response (antibody mediated). Viruses infect cells, and viral antigens are subsequently expressed in the context of MHC-1 on the surface; hence, they elicit a T-cell mediated response. If you thymectomize the mouse at birth, they will not be able to develop adequate T-cell mediated immunity, since the T-cells undergo positive and negative selection there. Thus, immunity to viral infection would be compromised. However, B-cells should still function properly.

          I hope that helps. Now you owe me ;)

          Treg (do you know what my name means now that you are taking immuno?)


          Now folks, dont forget, you need to have a deep understanding of what Treg just said for the MCAT ;)
           

          MoosePilot

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            SanDiegoSOD said:
            Now folks, dont forget, you need to have a deep understanding of what Treg just said for the MCAT ;)

            No, this is a bit deeper than MCAT bio....

            Do you agree with her answer? I wouldn't mind additional opinions. I think Treg's right, that was my first thought, too, but then I started second guessing myself and making it way too complex (did you know Measle virus can go straight into the nervous system, hiding from the immune system?).
             

            stoic

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              Treg said:
              BSA would be an extracellular antigen, so it would elicit a B-cell response (antibody mediated). Viruses infect cells, and viral antigens are subsequently expressed in the context of MHC-1 on the surface; hence, they elicit a T-cell mediated response. If you thymectomize the mouse at birth, they will not be able to develop adequate T-cell mediated immunity, since the T-cells undergo positive and negative selection there. Thus, immunity to viral infection would be compromised. However, B-cells should still function properly.

              moose,

              i like this answer. i'd have answered it the same way.
               

              mdsadler

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                I'd have answered the question in the same way but I would have made an additional comment. This is something I have found my Immunology profs use to trick us a little. Because B cells are dependent on T cells for activation/proliferation/class switching, thymectomy of a neonatal mouse may result in a deficiency to produce an adequate B cell response. The general idea that the profs are going for is that you understand what antigen elicits what response (as Treg pointed out) but indicating that a B cell response is dependent on T cells just adds to your answer.
                 

                MoosePilot

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                  mdsadler said:
                  I'd have answered the question in the same way but I would have made an additional comment. This is something I have found my Immunology profs use to trick us a little. Because B cells are dependent on T cells for activation/proliferation/class switching, thymectomy of a neonatal mouse may result in a deficiency to produce an adequate B cell response. The general idea that the profs are going for is that you understand what antigen elicits what response (as Treg pointed out) but indicating that a B cell response is dependent on T cells just adds to your answer.

                  Good point.
                   

                  Treg

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                    Ugh, I didn't want to make the answer sound too complex. Basically, mdsadler is right, in principle. However, there can be some "leakiness" in T-cells development, meaning that in the absence of a thymus some T-cells can mature in the periphery. Case in point, they almost always remove the thymus during heart transplant for access, and these people still can develop rejection episodes, etc. even in babies. Immunology is complex and never has any absolute rules, so try to keep your answer simple. :)

                    Treg
                    (PS don't make my flex my "My-PhD-in-immunology-will-be-defended-in-4-months muscles :laugh: Also, I am an "XX" type of Treg, i.e. that's Ms. Treg everyone!)
                     

                    Elphie

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                      MoosePilot said:
                      It's what the specific immune response would be to BSE and to measles virus that's got me stumped. If I knew where to read that, I'd be fine.


                      BSE! :eek: Poor mouse is going to get mad cow...;)

                      Yes, I know it was a typo, but it made me laugh! I'm sure the mouse will much prefer BSA to BSE. :)
                       

                      abraxas20

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                        BSE made me laugh. You are immunizing against it???? Cool....heheheheheheh

                        England will be grateful....

                        bovine spongiform encephalopathy, bwahahahah

                        bovine serum albumin, hehehehehe

                        yep same thing

                        ok sorry, had to get that out of my system
                         

                        scott858

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                          Your professor might want you to go a little more in-depth with the question. For example, T-cell independant and dependant antigens and also the particular virus (measles) that was mentioned. I won't spoil the answer's details because I know Treq wants everyone to know how smart she is, though she apparently thinks that other people can't understand nuance/details (I am assuming this last part b/c if one is going to defend for a PhD in immunology these things are bread and butter and they should have been included in the response answer)
                           
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