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answered, thanks!

longhaul3

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Does the dual degree make it 5 years? What sort of specialties do you see yourself going into?

If you end up going into something high-paying (whatever that looks like post-covid), the extra year in school could end up costing as much as the entire cost of attendance at either of the schools you'd pay full price for. And if that puts them all on an even-ish playing field, Michigan would be my last choice.
 
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deleted976595

Does the dual degree make it 5 years? What sort of specialties do you see yourself going into?

If you end up going into something high-paying (whatever that looks like post-covid), the extra year in school could end up costing as much as the entire cost of attendance at either of the schools you'd pay full price for. And if that puts them all on an even-ish playing field, Michigan would be my last choice.

Even if they do end up in something high paying, both UCSF and Perelman 4 year COA are almost 400k. Considering most high paying specialties have long residency, the cost becomes way greater when you account for interest accumulation during that time.

Take the full-ride and run! Michigan is a very highly regarded medical school and their other graduate programs are great too.
 
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Zen Arcade

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Even if they do end up in something high paying, both UCSF and Perelman 4 year COA are almost 400k. Considering most high paying specialties have long residency, the cost becomes way greater when you account for interest accumulation during that time.

Take the full-ride and run! Michigan is a very highly regarded medical school and their other graduate programs are great too.
400k COA becomes 450-500k after 4 years of med school and 7 years residency (length of residency if in a higher paying specialty like neurosurgery). No school is worth half a million more dollars, especially if you are comparing two schools in the top 20!
 
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longhaul3

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400k COA becomes 450-500k after 4 years of med school and 7 years residency (length of residency if in a higher paying specialty like neurosurgery). No school is worth half a million more dollars, especially if you are comparing two schools in the top 20!
Taking an extra year to finish med school costs more than $500k if you're a neurosurgeon.
 
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Does the dual degree make it 5 years? What sort of specialties do you see yourself going into?

If you end up going into something high-paying (whatever that looks like post-covid), the extra year in school could end up costing as much as the entire cost of attendance at either of the schools you'd pay full price for. And if that puts them all on an even-ish playing field, Michigan would be my last choice.

It does make it 5 years. Do you mind explaining a bit more about why Michigan would be your last choice?
 

Zen Arcade

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Taking an extra year to finish med school costs more than $500k if you're a neurosurgeon.
Not after taxes, normal living expenses, and malpractice... you probably have to be making at least 850k to have a 500k take home pay. And let me remind you... making 500k+ starting salary after residency is an anomaly. If you can avoid having debt and go to a good school that is almost always the best choice.
 
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deleted976595

Would also love to hear any perspectives about UCSF and Perelman if either one is able to offer more funding!

For Perelman at least it’s really easy to get a second degree from Penn. You can take a couple classes free at the other schools but most extra degrees will also require 5 years. Your Perelman financial aid also doesn’t cover you when you’re taking a year to complete another schools degree so you’d have to pay out of pocket or get funded some other way.

So now in that case you’re looking at 400k for Perelman plus anywhere from 40-200k+ for your second degree (a Wharton MBA costs ~$210k) and you’re still looking at an extra year before attending salary.

Take the Michigan full ride and run.
 
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Hi all! Would appreciate any perspectives on deciding between a full ride for a dual degree at University of Michigan versus no financial aid at UCSF or Perelman, if all other factors are considered equal (family, friends, location, etc.) What are the added opportunities or name brand value with UCSF or Perelman?
Full ride all the way.

in the end, the "name brand" doesn't matter when you're an attending. You'll make the same amount whether you went to U MI, or Drexel.
 
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longhaul3

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It does make it 5 years. Do you mind explaining a bit more about why Michigan would be your last choice?
Just because the others are a tier above Michigan. I'm not saying you shouldn't go to Michigan. If you want to do the dual degree, it's an obvious choice; I was never interested in another degree and am generally of the opinion that the tippy-top tier of schools are almost always worth it even at full price unless you know you want to do primary care. A lot of people even at Penn and UCSF end up taking a year off for research or whatever, so as soon as you do that you lose that angle.

Not after taxes, normal living expenses, and malpractice... you probably have to be making at least 850k to have a 500k take home pay. And let me remind you... making 500k+ starting salary after residency is an anomaly. If you can avoid having debt and go to a good school that is almost always the best choice.
It's not as far off as you may think. 500-600k is a common starting salary for neurosurgeons out of training. 850k is around average for neurosurgery.

How badly do you want the dual degree? Could you just take the full ride and graduate MD in four years? That would be the ideal situation here, for me at least.
 
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DNC127

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Michigan would be the right choice even if it cost the same. Why would anyone pick a prestigious medical school with prestigious sports over nerd schools (only kind of kidding). One day at UCSF you would be bound to step in human poop on the sidewalk and you would have to remind yourself that you are PAYING for that poop on your shoe when you could otherwise be chillin at big 10 football games with tons of hot thirsty undergrads and beer flowing like the river nile FOR FREE. Come on bro/girl bro this is pretty simple..
 
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DokterMom

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Not gonna lie -- I value the tippy-top academic pedigree and prestige factor and believe it can help you land the specialty and residency you want. If the cost of attendance difference were $100K, I'd say it was probably worth it to choose UCSF or Penn.

But the cost of attendance difference is nowhere near just $100K, and Michigan's a great school. When you're a resident and new attending and all of your friends are still broke, you'll be so very glad you did.
 
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JIMMYJOHNivy

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Not gonna lie -- I value the tippy-top academic pedigree and prestige factor and believe it can help you land the specialty and residency you want. If the cost of attendance difference were $100K, I'd say it was probably worth it to choose UCSF or Penn.

But the cost of attendance difference is nowhere near just $100K, and Michigan's a great school. When you're a resident and new attending and all of your friends are still broke, you'll be so very glad you did.

Would you say there's any prestige difference between UCSF vs. Penn?
 
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Probably not worth passing up the free ride, but something to note:

One of Michigan's accepted students sexually harassed and impersonated a black female online. Michigan did nothing after they were informed, and this student will be matriculating this summer. If you do end up choosing Michigan, definitely be careful around this student (especially if you're a female). Be safe!
 
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DokterMom

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Probably not worth passing up the free ride, but something to note:

One of Michigan's accepted students sexually harassed and impersonated a black female online. Michigan did nothing after they were informed, and this student will be matriculating this summer. If you do end up choosing Michigan, definitely be careful around this student (especially if you're a female). Be safe!

That's a pretty incendiary charge. I have to think this story has another side to it...?
 
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