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Any Canadians attending or graduated from University College Dublin in Ireland?

Discussion in 'Europe' started by Michael W48, Apr 19, 2004.

  1. Michael W48

    Michael W48 Junior Member
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    Hi,

    I am from Alberta, Canada and have been accepted into a 5 year med program at University College Dublin. I was wondering if there are any Canadians who are currently going to this school or who have recently graduated from it. I have a few general questions.

    How hard is it to secure an H1-B visa in a non-competitve residency in the US? Have there ever been any Canadian grads who have not been able to get a residency on an H1-B visa from this med school. In general, do you think you made the right decision choosing this school?

    Any help would really be appreciated.

    Mike
     
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  3. VTEC

    VTEC Junior Member

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    Hey Michael

    Im currently at UCD. From all the info i have gathered as Canadians when we apply to the US seeking residency the chances of us getting an H1-B visa are slim. we usually start with a J1 visa which gives us enough time to complete our residency and then we have to head home for 2 years. but what i have heard from people is that during our residency our visa could get changed to H1-B from the hospital. i have also been trying to gather as much info about this as possible. i have heard of people getting in some real competitive programs from this school and other schools in Ireland. i think i did make the right decision coming here. the education is good the city is good no problems yet other than it is kinda expensive. if you get any info let us know.
     
  4. Michael W48

    Michael W48 Junior Member
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    Hi VTEC,

    I didn't realize that getting an H1-B visa is so hard for Canadians. I heard that getting the J-1 is a huge pain. We have to write the Canadian exams and head back to Canada for two years and it's WAY more of a hassle to get. I have been researching the possibility of going to a foreign med schools for a while now and everyone tells me to stay away from the J-1 visa and don't even bother with it.

    I thought that if we apply to residencies at hospitals that accept the H1-B visa then we can get it. It just means we must limit where we apply for residencies to hospitals that give out the H1-B. Maybe it is much more difficult for Canadians that I thought. I have talked to a few Candians who have graduated from the Caribbean that getting the H1-B was not too much of a problem and they were matched with quite a few hospitals that delivers this visa. Are you sure that UCD grads don't go for the H1-B visa because it is so hard to get? Maybe they go for the J-1 because they are trying to get back into Canada?

    I think if I decided to go to a FMS then I would have to be sure that I was able to obtain an H1-B visa after passing the USLME's. Do you guys have an counsellors at UCD that can advise you on these issues? Or maybe any graduates that you or I can be put in touch with that have recieved the
    H1-B? I think this is a very important issue and I would like to have all the details on the H1-B before making any decisions. Like I said I heard getting the J-1 is ABSOLUTELY HELL and to AVOID it at all costs. This is coming from US doctors who have graduated from the caribbean who I have spoken to.
    Looking forward to your reply. See if you can get the contacts for any UCD grads who got the H1-B. Glad to hear that Dublin is a great place to live.

    Mike
     
  5. VTEC

    VTEC Junior Member

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    hey
    i was talking to a girl who is completing her final year at ucd and who is going to US to do her residency. she is canadian and got a position at mayo clinic. she said that she is getting a J1 visa and she was the one who gave me the info on the visas. i will try to ask other student too. one thing we can do is also contact Atlantic Bridge and see what kind of info they have. there is a student advisor in the school for international students her name is carl lusby
    [email protected] thats her email but i dont know how much she will kow about this subject. hope that helps
     
  6. leorl

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    You can talk to the AB office in Dublin personally as well. I'll try to get the contact info. for you later. Oh, found it... Arthur O'Malley 353 1 296 1144 or [email protected] .
     
  7. Flankstripe

    Flankstripe Junior Member
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    It would be interesting to see how that turns out; Mayo only sponsors J1's, and does not do H1B's. In order to get the Statement of Need from Health Canada, you need proof of passing the MCCEE. Canada only offers that exam in January, May, and September, and you need to have completed all med school requirements before you can sit for it. I assume that if she hasn't graduated med school yet, that she hasn't written it yet, and therefore will be writing it this May.

    This year's MCCEE is held on May 13. The marks take 6-8 weeks before being released. That takes you to somewhere around June 13th at the very earliest. Then you've got to send all your stuff to Health Canada to get a Statement of Need approved. That might take an additional week. You're now around June 20th. Then, the EVSP portion of ECFMG has to receive that Statement of Need through the mail, and generate a DS-2019 form for you. That's an additional 4-6 weeks. Now you're at July 20th. You can finally get your J-1 visa. Then, as a Canadian, you need a Social Security number for all sorts of hospital forms, as well as for your temporary state licensure. The SSN can take another 2-3 weeks to get processed. Now you're well into August (or even September, if you take the upper end duration of each delay), having missed all of your internship orientation as well as your first month of internship. Not good. There's only so much internship you can miss before you've blown your timeline for the year.

    This all assumes that there's no delays in processing the paperwork, and that the mail is super-efficient at getting your documents where they need to go, without being misdirected or lost. If there's a faster way of getting these documents out, I'd like to hear about it.
     
  8. VTEC

    VTEC Junior Member

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    Hey

    From what she we need the EE which i think she has already taken.

    So what you are saying is there are programs that would give us a H1-B visa from the start.
     
  9. roo

    roo Voice From The Wilderness
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    As a correction,

    As of 2002-2003 academic year, the EE exam can be written during final year of medical school, before you graduate.

    Prior to 2002-2003, needed to wait until graduated before sitting the EE, which was painful.

    The UCD class of the time was actually the major driving force for the change. The MCC guys came over to Dublin, had a chat with the deans, and subsequently changed the rules so that could graduate from Ireland and start residency in Canada right away (and also UK, Australia, et al).

    So the corrected timeline is:
    In fall of graduating year: write EE exam.
    Your results will come in time for the match either for US (J1) or Canada later that year before you graduate.

    I'll even dig out the actual reference for you, since I am a nice guy. :)

    Read the information document regarding EE exam, which is online here at the MCC site:

    http://www.mcc.ca/pdf/2004ee/ee_pamphlet_2004.pdf

    Then scroll down to section 4 which is "Educational Requirements". It will say in it:

    "STUDENTS OF INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL SCHOOLS (IMSs) may apply for the MCCEE if they are (i) in the final clinical year of medical school and fully expected to graduate within nine (9) months following the administration of the examination session for which he/she is applying, and (ii) intending to register for postgraduate medical training in Canada through the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) or other arrangement."


    If want the US H1B route (i.e. you can't bring yourself to return to Canada for 2 years after you finish residency), then would need to wait until graduate medical school since need to fully finish medical school before can sit USMLE step 3, which is a requirement for H1B.

    As an aside, 2 of the 10 Canadians in our class ended up choosing Mayo for their residencies.

    Best wishes,
    roo
     
  10. Michael W48

    Michael W48 Junior Member
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    Hi roo,

    Thank you for your message. I have decided to attend University College Dublin (UCD) next year so I am trying to collect as much information as I possibly can regarding my options once I graduate. My goal is to practice medicine in the US.

    I read on the link you sent me that international students can write the EE exam before they graduate only if they are "intending to register for postgraduate medical training in Canada through the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) or other arrangement." I thought that students graduating from Ireland do their residencies in the US and enter the US matching system rather than the Canadian one (CaRMS). Wouldn't this mean that I wouldn't be viable to write the EE exam since students must "register for postgraduate medical training in Canada through CaRMS." Maybe I'm not reading this correctly. If you could let me know that would be great.

    I was also wondering what Irish medical school you graduated from or are currently attending. Are you Canadian? I have asked Atlantic Bridge to give me the e-mails of some recent Canadian UCD graduates or current Canadian UCD students so that I can ask them a few quick questions. Atlantic Bridge still hasn't got back to me though. I was wondering if you could maybe answer a few of them...

    1) Do most Canadian Irish med school graduates go for the J1 or the H1B and why?

    2) Do Canadian Irish graduates have a hard time recieving the H1B? Rougly what % of graduates receive the H1B? Must they attain really high marks on their boards and in med school to get it? If the HIB is relatively easy to get then why do any of the Canadian graduates even consider a J1 if they want to practice in the US?

    3) In general did you enjoy your experience at UCD (or whichever Irish med school you attended)?

    4) Are you happy with your decision?

    Thank you for all your time and help. Hope to hear from you soon.

    Mike
     
  11. roo

    roo Voice From The Wilderness
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    Atlantic Bridge probably won't give out emails of recent grads [and I think now quite rightly so, since people will ask the same questions over and over to residents who don't have much time. You can do a list search for my username in these forums alone and see that I have already answered many of these things before.] So short answers:

    (0) Most of the class went to US (about 7). 3 to Canada. It worked in the order of things that I described. If want further info, can talk to the MCC directly if there has been any changes.

    (1) J1. H1B loses a year of your life in limbo, less places to train since more residencies are available to J1 holders than H1B.

    (2) Don't know. Not many people do, since there is so little point to it. There is a year wasted doing nothing for H1B for no/pittance salary (or else joining a residency that didn't fill after match/school/step3 is over, meaning sloppy seconds). Compared to working in Canada for 2 years at a full salary when residency is over, then being a free agent.

    (3) Yes. 100% recommendation. In travelling around residencies there are some that hated their medical school experiences (mean preceptors, cut-throat collegues) whereas mine were good work-hard, play-hard years. There is only a fixed amount of years in someone's 20s and early 30s, might as well train in an environment where one is enjoying the process.

    (4) 100% recommendation. There is no accurate way to compare other places where may have spent medical school, but now that have come out the graduation door I know that for myself things like: cramming entire medical school education into a 3 year program, having to spend a clinical-level tutorial with people having no basic science education flogging through a review of what a mitochondria is, having super-high service-to-hospital rotations at the expense of academica, doing anatomy in a 5 week crash binge-and-purge memorization instead of the full-on Irish attention, cut-throat classmates instead of the Irish way of we-all-have-guaranteed-internships-waiting-but-the-bar-for-passing-is-high-so-lets-work-together-to-all-do-well, would not have been a good fit for what I was looking for. Whereas all the items from my medical school years fit well for what I was looking for (except for the upswell in racism towards the asylum seeking immigrants).

    Best wishes.
     
  12. ceeepz

    ceeepz Member
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    in order to get a j1 visa you have to apply to a specialty that is in "need". whatever the hell that means. as far as i know every specialty in canada is in need. does anyone know if something like internal medicine is in "need"? and what if you wanna later do a fellowship. do they kick you out after internal medicine back to canada then you reapply for a j1?

    thanks for your help!
     
  13. mriazi

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    Im a high school student from Ontario, my average is almost 90% which i think is a 4.0 GPA and im wondering what my chances are of getting in? Im applying to UCD, RCSI, and NUI Galway! also if anyone goes to anyone of these schools for medicine could you please tell me what your experience is/was like? thanks for any help!
     

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