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stayingorgoing

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Hey everyone, I ‘m a bit confused as to where I should apply for school and was wondering if you all could shed some light on the matter.

To start off, my first two years of undergrad I was a lazy slacker who did not put in much effort in to classes and I ended up with a woeful 2.5 gpa. Long story short I finally got my act together and decided that I was only hurting myself by not putting in my best effort. I transferred schools and majors (from economics to biology) and began a slow upward improvement by beginning my academic career completely over.

3.5 years later, my current GPA is around a 3.65 and my science GPA is hovering at 3.35-3.4 (just have a few electives I'm finishing up this semester before graduation but I'm sure my grades will remain consistent). One giant mark on this transcript is the fact that I have two W's on my transcript but those classes have been retaken and I received A-‘s in both of them. My last MCAT score was a 39.
For extracurricular activities I do have 5 years of interning with cardiac and thoracic surgeons. I may hold off applying for school immediately because there is a very good chance that right after I graduate I can be hired as a researcher in a lab I also volunteer at for a year so that I can continue to build up my stats.
So my question is, do I have a chance at a low tier American school or did the initial two years guarantee my only hope is in the Caribbean?

Thank you for any input.


EDIT:
Additional data now compiled thanks to the overall GPA calculator link suggested by CatalystikOverall

GPA's factoring the terrible start at my initial school:
Overall GPA: 3.2
Science GPA: 2.9
MCAT: 39
 
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UnclePhil

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You should be fine with US MD schools, you clearly worked very hard to get where you are with regards to your grades and I don't think that will go ignored.
 

Pattycake25

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So my question is, do I have a chance at a low tier American school or did the initial two years guarantee my only hope is in the Caribbean?

Thank you for any input.

You absolutely have a chance here at home. They certainly recognize upward trends. And was that 39 on a practice, or the real thing?

Edit: Congrats on the MCAT. However, your sGPA is now too low to have a chance, sadly. Sub-3.0 autoscreens you out everywhere AFAIK - nothing will protect you from the heartless computers who will see your app first. You need to get it higher.
 
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stayingorgoing

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Thanks UnclePhil. My only real concern was the fact that my combined GPA is rather low, since the medical schools will see the previous 2.5, and I was not sure that it was something I could really ever make up.

You absolutely have a chance here at home. They certainly recognize upward trends. And was that 39 on a practice, or the real thing?

Thanks! Knowing that they look at improvement despite a terrible start eases the mind a little bit. You don't know how I've been beating myself up for "ruining everything several years ago just because I was a lazy 18 year old."

And it was on the actual exam but it was the second time I took it. I received a 35 on the previous attempt.
 

TheMightySmiter

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Hey everyone, I ‘m a bit confused as to where I should apply for school and was wondering if you all could shed some light on the matter.

To start off, my first two years of undergrad I was a lazy slacker who did not put in much effort in to classes and I ended up with a woeful 2.5 gpa. Long story short I finally got my act together and decided that I was only hurting myself by not putting in my best effort. I transferred schools and majors (from economics to biology) and began a slow upward improvement by beginning my academic career completely over.

3.5 years later, my current GPA is around a 3.65 and my science GPA is hovering at 3.35-3.4 (just have a few electives I'm finishing up this semester before graduation but I'm sure my grades will remain consistent). One giant mark on this transcript is the fact that I have two W's on my transcript but those classes have been retaken and I received A-‘s in both of them. My last MCAT score was a 39.
For extracurricular activities I do have 5 years of interning with cardiac and thoracic surgeons. I may hold off applying for school immediately because there is a very good chance that right after I graduate I can be hired as a researcher in a lab I also volunteer at for a year so that I can continue to build up my stats.
So my question is, do I have a chance at a low tier American school or did the initial two years guarantee my only hope is in the Caribbean?

Thank you for any input.

A 3.65/39 with an upward trend gives you a great shot. Your sGPA is a little low, but are your recent science grades high? If so, I think you are a good candidate for US MD. Adcoms are more likely up forgive a poor start if you have a couple years of consistent great grades. Your MCAT score clearly shows your ability in the sciences. Do you have ECs apart from interning, like community service, teaching, or leadership? If not, it might be worth taking an extra year to expand your resume.
 

stayingorgoing

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A 3.65/39 with an upward trend gives you a great shot. Your sGPA is a little low, but are your recent science grades high? If so, I think you are a good candidate for US MD. Adcoms are more likely up forgive a poor start if you have a couple years of consistent great grades. Your MCAT score clearly shows your ability in the sciences. Do you have ECs apart from interning, like community service, teaching, or leadership? If not, it might be worth taking an extra year to expand your resume.

I do have a string of some B's but for the most part my more recent upper level science courses are in the A- to A region.

I have years of volunteer work in local soup kitchens and have also logged in a decent amount of time doing work for an NGO to help give women in third world countries, specifically South Asia, some financial and personal independence. Work focuses mostly on helping them learn trades that they can hopefully use earn a living. I was fortunate enough to actually travel to India last year during my winter break to do some work hands on.
 

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yeah, you're in great shape, don't even think about going to the Caribbean with your grades and scores. Who cares if you goofed off as a freshman as long as you eventually buckled down?
 

stayingorgoing

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Does the "current GPA" you cite include the grades from both colleges you attended? If not, maybe you could calculate everything together and tell us what it is. There is a Calculator in the READ THIS FIRST sticky at the top of this forum.

No it does not, this is where my concern is. I just did the calculator (thank you for the link) and my final numbers come to a 3.2 overall GPA along with a rather paltry 2.9 overall science GPA. I guess my terrible start hurt me much more than I realized but I have no one else to blame but myself.

It appears I will most likely be considering the Caribbean after this sobering revelation, thank you very much. I probably would have wasted a lot of money and a lot of misplaced hope applying to most American schools. It may be a long shot but hopefully I can keep my head up and power through four years of the Caribbean and match into a decent US residency.
 

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Before you make that decision about the Caribbean:

- Look into post-bacc programs. Specifically 2nd bachelor's programs. This will allow you to register for more college classes, it's cheaper than a formal special master's program, and it allows you to enhance your undergrad GPA. The intention is not to complete a 2nd bachelor's, only to take extra classes to boost that GPA up. It's what I intend to do after I graduate this year.

- Also, look into trying to retake some of the courses you received poor marks in. DO schools have a grade replacement policy, so it'll be like those poor grades never existed.
 

stayingorgoing

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Before you make that decision about the Caribbean:

- Look into post-bacc programs. Specifically 2nd bachelor's programs. This will allow you to register for more college classes, it's cheaper than a formal special master's program, and it allows you to enhance your undergrad GPA. The intention is not to complete a 2nd bachelor's, only to take extra classes to boost that GPA up. It's what I intend to do after I graduate this year.

- Also, look into trying to retake some of the courses you received poor marks in. DO schools have a grade replacement policy, so it'll be like those poor grades never existed.

I may toy with the idea of a post - bacc but at this point I've already gone back to school and started over once. I think I just want to start the actual med school portion of my life. (please tell me if this sounds laughably short sighted, I think I'm just frustrated over how my own lethargy from years ago has ruined a lot of opportunities for me).

I don't really want to do DO schools, I really have my heart set out for an MD.
 

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It's not laughably short sighted, but unfortunately this is how medical school admissions are in the United States. These guys are looking for visible proof that you want to really go into this profession, unlike other countries where you just score high marks on a couple of exams and can pursue medicine without any nonsense ECs.

If you do wish to go to the Caribbean, I hope you do well and get a residency in the US. Call me arrogant, but your MCAT score is way too good for those schools down there.
 
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stayingorgoing

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It's not laughably short sighted, but unfortunately this is how medical school admissions are in the United States. These guys are looking for visible proof that you want to really go into this profession, unlike other countries where you just score high marks on a couple of exams and can pursue medicine without any nonsense ECs.

If you do wish to go to the Caribbean, I hope you do well and get a residency in the US. Call me arrogant, but your MCAT score is way too good for those schools down there.

Thanks, I wish I could go back and yell at my 18 year old self but sadly it's not an option. I'm going to have to keep on rolling and use this life experience as motivation to obtain some stellar grades in the Caribbean. I'm only 23 so hopefully I have more than enough time to make some of my dreams a reality, only this time I plan on working hard the entire time.

Once again thanks for your input, suggestions, and most of all, your encouragement.
 
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No it does not, this is where my concern is. I just did the calculator (thank you for the link) and my final numbers come to a 3.2 overall GPA along with a rather paltry 2.9 overall science GPA. I guess my terrible start hurt me much more than I realized but I have no one else to blame but myself.

It appears I will most likely be considering the Caribbean after this sobering revelation, thank you very much. I probably would have wasted a lot of money and a lot of misplaced hope applying to most American schools. It may be a long shot but hopefully I can keep my head up and power through four years of the Caribbean and match into a decent US residency.
Using the same calculator, figure out how many math and science classes it would take to get your BCMP GPA over 3.0.

Are there any prerequisites below a C that you didn't retake? How many A-range grades have you earned in upper-level Bio? Have you looked into a Special Masters Program?
 

stayingorgoing

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Using the same calculator, figure out how many math and science classes it would take to get your BCMP GPA over 3.0.

Are there any prerequisites below a C that you didn't retake? How many A-range grades have you earned in upper-level Bio? Have you looked into a Special Masters Program?

There was one C- I had in chem I that I retook and received a B+. I had one dreadful D in calculus after suffering through one of the worst professors I have ever encountered (not trying to make an excuse though so please don't interpret it as that) but I retook it with another professor who also wasn't that fantastic but with actual work ethic I somehow pushed myself into a B- there (though I still maintain I deserved a higher grade ;)).

Sadly the aforementioned Chem I, Calc I in addition to Chem II and Bio I were taken during my slacker phase in which I received a C+ in both Chem II and Bio I. But I do have some upward trend with an A-'s in Organic I and an A in Organic II, Physics I and II have A's, and an A- in Biology II.

And looking at my first post I realized I worded it vaguely and incorrectly. I am not graduating this semester and have a fair share of upper level classes to complete along with some additional classes that I am now considering taking after reading the replies in this thread because they may expand my knowledge and more importantly, raise my GPA.

And for the upper level classes I've taken so far:
Genetics - A
Microbiology and Lab - A
Cell Biology - I'm completing it this semester but I'm fairly certain I am in the B+ range
Recombinant DNA Structure - B+
My program also requires outside research in a lab for credit which I'm also doing this semester but I'm confident that I will receive an A in that class as well.

*There may be some weird calculations going on with the grades but that's mostly because each class is weighed differently. For example genetics is a 2 credit course while recombinant DNA structure is a 4 credit course (which makes no sense since I worked 10x harder in genetics but I digress). Also some schools weigh their classes different so the D in Calc I was 4 credits in my previous school but 3 in the recent school I retook it in.

Also I don't know if it makes any real difference or if it is a stat of any note but the non science classes in my previous school I had close to a 2.8 gpa but since transferring my GPA in non science classes is 3.93.
 

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First, I edited my first post, although based on your other posts it appears you understand your actual position.

But listen to me. I was JUST accepted to med school - a real, true American MD program - a month ago. I turn 26 Monday. For several years, I felt the same way you did. I had an explanation for my poor performance at first, but it was small consolation, to see people in my freshman dorm go on to med school before I even finished undergrad, and who will be graduating before I start. And I thought about going Caribbean, definitely.

But I did not. And you know what? Looking back now, I am so glad I didn't.

You are in a much different position than I was. You have already proven you can handle med school, with your upper-level coursework. Your current challenge is little more than passing the auto-cutoffs, and to be honest, you're rather close as it is - it's not like you have a 2.4 or something. I think you will immediately impress any living person who looks at your app, and I think your chances at an American MD are alive and well, albeit a little stalled. Yes, it will take a couple more years, but you know what? You wouldn't start Carib. for almost a year anyway, and that's if you start winter/spring '13 at the earliest. And you've got decades left, without even taking the current pace of medical advances in prolonging life into account.

You can continue to resent yourself for your past mistakes. But - and I can hardly believe I am saying this, given how I felt myself just a few short months ago - do not feel rushed. Honestly, in a limited sense, I'd actually feel (somewhat) more comfortable with someone like you than someone who excelled without fail since high school. In your case, I am more confident your efforts, and your momentum, will not die out, and you, better than most other applicants, appreciate the value of the hard work it takes to excel in medicine.

I recognize I am being very pejorative of Caribbean medical schools. I know that some of those schools have proven their capacity to produce excellent physicians, and that the Caribbean stigma they must carry with the rest is no longer merited. But, why should you take the stigma with you into your career, when just another year or two can allow you to avoid it forever?

It's your choice. You have my support either way. Just really consider all your options before you make your decision, as it is a BIG one. =)
 

stayingorgoing

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So what would your best potential cGPA and BCPM be by the time you graduate.

I think if I really push myself and take a few more extra science classes outside my major requirements (biochem and such) I can push it to 3.2 - 3.3 but that's only if I get A's in all of them. If that's what it takes though I'll devote all my time and effort in to doing so.

I know in a previous post you asked if I had looked into special Masters programs and I have not. Would you recommend this over delaying undergraduate graduation to take more classes?

First, I edited my first post, although based on your other posts it appears you understand your actual position.

But listen to me. I was JUST accepted to med school - a real, true American MD program - a month ago. I turn 26 Monday. For several years, I felt the same way you did. I had an explanation for my poor performance at first, but it was small consolation, to see people in my freshman dorm go on to med school before I even finished undergrad, and who will be graduating before I start. And I thought about going Caribbean, definitely.

But I did not. And you know what? Looking back now, I am so glad I didn't.

You are in a much different position than I was. You have already proven you can handle med school, with your upper-level coursework. Your current challenge is little more than passing the auto-cutoffs, and to be honest, you're rather close as it is - it's not like you have a 2.4 or something. I think you will immediately impress any living person who looks at your app, and I think your chances at an American MD are alive and well, albeit a little stalled. Yes, it will take a couple more years, but you know what? You wouldn't start Carib. for almost a year anyway, and that's if you start winter/spring '13 at the earliest. And you've got decades left, without even taking the current pace of medical advances in prolonging life into account.

You can continue to resent yourself for your past mistakes. But - and I can hardly believe I am saying this, given how I felt myself just a few short months ago - do not feel rushed. Honestly, in a limited sense, I'd actually feel (somewhat) more comfortable with someone like you than someone who excelled without fail since high school. In your case, I am more confident your efforts, and your momentum, will not die out, and you, better than most other applicants, appreciate the value of the hard work it takes to excel in medicine.

I recognize I am being very pejorative of Caribbean medical schools. I know that some of those schools have proven their capacity to produce excellent physicians, and that the Caribbean stigma they must carry with the rest is no longer merited. But, why should you take the stigma with you into your career, when just another year or two can allow you to avoid it forever?

It's your choice. You have my support either way. Just really consider all your options before you make your decision, as it is a BIG one. =)

Thanks for the extremely nice words and a huge congratulations on your success! If you don't mind me asking, what did your final stats end up being?
 
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I think if I really push myself and take a few more extra science classes outside my major requirements (biochem and such) I can push it to 3.2 - 3.3 but that's only if I get A's in all of them. If that's what it takes though I'll devote all my time and effort in to doing so.

I know in a previous post you asked if I had looked into special Masters programs and I have not. Would you recommend this over delaying undergraduate graduation to take more classes?
If you can get As in everything over this next year and get your BCPM GPA to 3.3, with your MCAT score of 39 and many years of good GPA, I'd like to think there's a good chance that an SMP won't be needed, as you've clearly proven you have what it takes.

ECs are another issue to discuss.
 

stayingorgoing

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If you can get As in everything over this next year and get your BCPM GPA to 3.3, with your MCAT score of 39 and many years of good GPA, I'd like to think there's a good chance that an SMP won't be needed, as you've clearly proven you have what it takes.

ECs are another issue to discuss.

Well for now I have:

  • 5 years of interning with cardiac surgeons
  • Currently doing some research for class credit but there is a very good chance, should I pursue it, I can get a research job for a year or so after graduation to pad my stats and hopefully get my name added to a publication.
  • Soup kitchen work for many years.
  • Working at Non-Governmental Organization that focuses on helping women in developing third world countries in South Asia learn trades for financial and personal independence. Went down to India last year during winter break to do some hands on work and may possibly do it again this upcoming winter in Bangladesh.

Is there anything else you would recommend I do?
 
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Well for now I have:

  • 5 years of interning with cardiac surgeons
  • Currently doing some research for class credit but there is a very good chance, should I pursue it, I can get a research job for a year or so after graduation to pad my stats and hopefully get my name added to a publication.
  • Soup kitchen work for many years.
  • Working at Non-Governmental Organization that focuses on helping women in developing third world countries in South Asia learn trades for financial and personal independence. Went down to India last year during winter break to do some hands on work and may possibly do it again this upcoming winter in Bangladesh.
Is there anything else you would recommend I do?
I'm not sure what you mean by "interning" so maybe you could describe what your clinical experience is where you interact with sick people.

If you have some shadowing with the surgeons, then good. but some diversity would be better. At the minimum, add an office-based primary care doc.

Do you have an activity that you'd consider teaching or leadership?

Stick with the research and stay involved with the soup kitchen, where your long term of service is really terrific.
 

stayingorgoing

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I'm not sure what you mean by "interning" so maybe you could describe what your clinical experience is where you interact with sick people.

If you have some shadowing with the surgeons, then good. but some diversity would be better. At the minimum, add an office-based primary care doc.

Do you have an activity that you'd consider teaching or leadership?

Stick with the research and stay involved with the soup kitchen, where your long term of service is really terrific.

Sorry, vague words. I shadowed the surgeons for a while, was able to go with them through their rounds and was even allowed to be in the surgery rooms during procedures (which was awesome!). I also work in their offices as well when they're meeting the patients and having their first consults. I'm also present for their initial and subsequent post surgical check ups with the nurses. But I will definitely look into an office based primary doctor, thanks for this recommendation.

I did some SAT tutoring at a small prep place for a period of close to 8 months but that was about 2 years ago. I also privately tutored a few middle school students on a variety of topics at a separate prep place but this also was around 2 years ago.
 
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Sorry, vague words. I shadowed the surgeons for a while, was able to go with them through their rounds and was even allowed to be in the surgery rooms during procedures (which was awesome!). I also work in their offices as well when they're meeting the patients and having their first consults. I'm also present for their initial and subsequent post surgical check ups with the nurses. But I will definitely look into an office based primary doctor, thanks for this recommendation.

I did some SAT tutoring at a small prep place for a period of close to 8 months but that was about 2 years ago. I also privately tutored a few middle school students on a variety of topics at a separate prep place but this also was around 2 years ago.
the teaching you have done sounds fine.

From what you describe the interning was more of a passive observership where you did not personally interact with patients and do something for them. If true, I suggest you maybe look into a volunteer position where you can actively engage sick people or change the nature of your role with this internship.
 

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the teaching you have done sounds fine.

From what you describe the interning was more of a passive observership where you did not personally interact with patients and do something for them. If true, I suggest you maybe look into a volunteer position where you can actively engage sick people or change the nature of your role with this internship.

Yes, you're right. I'll speak to them about possibly changing the role of this internship or I'll look into your suggestion of finding an office based primary doctor.

Thanks again for your many posts regarding my chances/improving my chances. It has been very much appreciated and I'll look into improving my shot and increasing my marketability to schools as soon as possible.

Edit: A question about a switching to a different doctor. This internship, although rather passive, with its combined research opportunities and such had the benefit of being paid. Since I'm also paying for my own schooling (family isn't in the best financial state) I can't afford to really cut too many hours from it. Would medical schools take this fact into consideration if I'm only able to volunteer a handful of hours?
 
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Don't even think about Caribbean! Go get it. I've got my money on you kicking ass to a 3.2 and getting in somewhere upper mid tier or even higher. You'll be some adcom's darling GPA outlier. Work hard.
 

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I think if I really push myself and take a few more extra science classes outside my major requirements (biochem and such) I can push it to 3.2 - 3.3 but that's only if I get A's in all of them. If that's what it takes though I'll devote all my time and effort in to doing so.

I know in a previous post you asked if I had looked into special Masters programs and I have not. Would you recommend this over delaying undergraduate graduation to take more classes?



Thanks for the extremely nice words and a huge congratulations on your success! If you don't mind me asking, what did your final stats end up being?

Sorry for delay in response! I wound up with a 3.11 cGPA, 3.3 sGPA, 3.44 smpGPA, 35S MCAT (worth noting: I did undergrad at JHU, which apparently gets some slight measure of forgiveness from adcoms due to its rigor).

Extracurrics. were well-rounded, but backloaded, with nothing spectacular.
 

stayingorgoing

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Sorry for delay in response! I wound up with a 3.11 cGPA, 3.3 sGPA, 3.44 smpGPA, 35S MCAT (worth noting: I did undergrad at JHU, which apparently gets some slight measure of forgiveness from adcoms due to its rigor).

Extracurrics. were well-rounded, but backloaded, with nothing spectacular.

Awesome stuff, congrats yet again! And yes, I'm assuming JHU is extremely rigorous, kudos to you for continuing in your academic success. Let's hope I can emulate it in the coming years.


Don't even think about Caribbean! Go get it. I've got my money on you kicking ass to a 3.2 and getting in somewhere upper mid tier or even higher. You'll be some adcom's darling GPA outlier. Work hard.

Haha thank you for the vote of confidence! Here's hoping!
 
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Edit: A question about a switching to a different doctor. This internship, although rather passive, with its combined research opportunities and such had the benefit of being paid. Since I'm also paying for my own schooling (family isn't in the best financial state) I can't afford to really cut too many hours from it. Would medical schools take this fact into consideration if I'm only able to volunteer a handful of hours?
Five hours won't cut it.

There must be a way to turn your current position into something more active. If this is providing you with a "research opportunity" maybe you could call patients with a survey or to inquire about their progress. Maybe the nurse would allow you some patient interaction when checking patients in, like getting their medication history and filling out a checklist of symptoms, or taking their vital signs. Maybe you could summon patients to be put in rooms, collect a specimen, wheel them to a lab, or whatever. The point is that you need to talk to them and help in some way (while they are awake).

If this is unlikely to happen, then look for a volunteer activity for 2-3 hours a week at a nursing home, hospice, clinic, rehab center. By a year from now, you'd have more than enough "active interaction" hours. If necessary, take time away from the soup kitchen opportunity. Or sleep less.

For the office-based primary care shadowing, 4-8 hours ould be fine.
 

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Five hours won't cut it.

There must be a way to turn your current position into something more active. If this is providing you with a "research opportunity" maybe you could call patients with a survey or to inquire about their progress. Maybe the nurse would allow you some patient interaction when checking patients in, like getting their medication history and filling out a checklist of symptoms, or taking their vital signs. Maybe you could summon patients to be put in rooms, collect a specimen, wheel them to a lab, or whatever. The point is that you need to talk to them and help in some way (while they are awake).

If this is unlikely to happen, then look for a volunteer activity for 2-3 hours a week at a nursing home, hospice, clinic, rehab center. By a year from now, you'd have more than enough "active interaction" hours. If necessary, take time away from the soup kitchen opportunity. Or sleep less.

For the office-based primary care shadowing, 4-8 hours ould be fine.

My curse of being vague continues, apologies. I meant I could do only a handful of hours (4-5) a week. So if I start as soon as possible and keep it up for a year or two hopefully I can have a nice accumulation of hours.
 

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IMHO:

MCAT = 39 = welcome to top tier medical school

Just my observations. High MCATs seem to make up for everything these days.
 

stayingorgoing

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If you got in 1-1.5 years averaging 2-3 hours per week, you'd be fine.

Great, I'll get on it as soon as my finals are done. Thanks for all your help, I'll be sure to mention you in my personal statement ;P

IMHO:

MCAT = 39 = welcome to top tier medical school

Just my observations. High MCATs seem to make up for everything these days.

Haha I wish this was the case but it is not. High MCAT shows that you know the material but a good gpa coupled with it lets schools know that you can maintain a workload and excel at it. A high MCAT score is beneficial, but it's not enough to completely make up for my gpa. Also, things such as EC's play a huge role too.

As for a top tier school, there are people applying to top tier schools with my MCAT score (or better) but with 3.9's - 4.0's.
 
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stayingorgoing

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Will they believe that you received advice from a cat on an online forum? Lol

Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710e using Tapatalk

Are you kidding me, this is my "in" to med school. How many other apps can boast that? Harvard Medical Class of 2018 here I come ;)
 

UnclePhil

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IMHO:

MCAT = 39 = welcome to top tier medical school

Just my observations. High MCATs seem to make up for everything these days.
Wrong, I know plenty of people with high MCATs and lower GPAs that manage to get into med schools, but far from top 10-15 schools. Believe it or not, people with high MCAT scores is not that scarce.
 

stayingorgoing

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Wrong, I know plenty of people with high MCATs and lower GPAs that manage to get into med schools, but far from top 10-15 schools. Believe it or not, people with high MCAT scores is not that scarce.

Yep, an acquaintance of mine had a sub 3.0 gpa but a 41 MCAT and is now attending a Caribbean school, though I have forgotten which one.

Clearly there's something in the water of my neighborhood that causes pre-meds to have horrible GPA's but uncharacteristically high MCAT scores.
 
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