Any other accepted non-trads feeling nervous?

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amuseddoughnut

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Any other older non-trads starting to get nervous about leaving life as we know it to start on this new adventure of med school?

I am so grateful for this opportunity, but a little bit nervous about exchanging my small paycheck and lifestyle (modest as it is) for the life of a student and the debt of a student. There are so many unknowns ahead. I am also nervous that the length of training will feel more and more overwhelming once we get in the middle of it.

Perhaps biology is just kicking in and letting me know I am entering uncharted territory? I would love to hear how other non-trads are feeling.

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The fear of the unknown has been slowly building up as we get closer to August. But, I'm not nearly as scared about the unknowns as I am about the knowns - particularly, the massive student loan debt. I thought my undergraduate loans were a "substantial amount of debt", but those loans are nowhere close to what's to come. I know it's all relative, and that we'll be making more than we do now someday, but nothing freaks me out more than that.
 
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I'm not feeling nervous at all actually... Maybe it's not real for me yet because I'm still undecided on where I'll be going, and more focused on class and figuring out how best to use the summer for leisure. Definitely excited though!

After such a long time spent as an allied health person, it's going to be so weird to be a medical student. I still sometimes think about how during an interview tour our group walked past some EMT's with an empty stretcher. I was grinning at them and wanted to high five them and be like ahhhh I'm one of you! But they were super bashful and I think assumed this group of suits walking around must have been some sort of important people :p
 
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Yes. After 2 years (a failed cycle, then a successful one), I've gone through highs and lows... Now I'm in the 'relax above all else' phase, and a bit of me wonders how it'll be to dust off the cobwebs (even though it'll only have been a few months). But most of all I'm excited. A new place, a new rhythm, a lot of potentially cool stuff ahead. I've read so much about the horror that is medicine (education/practice) on the internet and these forums, but I've also heard great things and personally only know people who really enjoy what they do, so I'm trying to balance my optimism -- there will be crap, but there's a lot to look forward to as well.

I've been veering further and further away from what I wanted to do in life over the past 7 years, so now I'm finally putting myself back on track. Certainly better prepared for it now.
 
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Any other older non-trads starting to get nervous about leaving life as we know it to start on this new adventure of med school?

I am so grateful for this opportunity, but a little bit nervous about exchanging my small paycheck and lifestyle (modest as it is) for the life of a student and the debt of a student. There are so many unknowns ahead. I am also nervous that the length of training will feel more and more overwhelming once we get in the middle of it.

Perhaps biology is just kicking in and letting me know I am entering uncharted territory? I would love to hear how other non-trads are feeling.

Just a few comments since I went to medical school at 32 with 2 kids. Was scared to death and had been out of school for about 7 years. Here are some tidbits that a wise friend told me along the way.

1. Everyone in medical school was in the top of their undergrad class and are type A. You likely won't be in the top anymore.
2. Medical school is a BUSINESS and they are not in the business of failing students, they lose revenue if they do.
3. If you have a family, it's OK to have some C's and be with your kids. Board scores are the most important.
4. Medical school is overwhelming and know that if you are frustrated and crying, most of your classmates are too.
5. You absolutely cannot understand it all, but know you can pass it all.
6. No one ever asks you where you graduated in your medical school class. I have never been asked that. The person who is last in the class is called "doctor".
7. If you find yourself struggling be sure to ask for help EARLY. This includes your mental health as well as your classes.
8. Do NOT pull all nighters, get enough sleep.
9. If you are moving a long distance, get your apartment set up, your fridge stocked, supplies stocked. Know where the post office and the grocery store is early. Once you start class you will not have time.
 
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Any other older non-trads starting to get nervous about leaving life as we know it to start on this new adventure of med school?

I am so grateful for this opportunity, but a little bit nervous about exchanging my small paycheck and lifestyle (modest as it is) for the life of a student and the debt of a student. There are so many unknowns ahead. I am also nervous that the length of training will feel more and more overwhelming once we get in the middle of it.

Perhaps biology is just kicking in and letting me know I am entering uncharted territory? I would love to hear how other non-trads are feeling.

I've learned to relish that feeling of nervousness before starting a big new adventure. That feeling is the essence of being alive, for me at least. Risking absolutely everything you have for an uncertain future is why we're here in the first place! You only get one life to live, so live it as hard as you can.
 
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I'm not feeling nervous at all actually... Maybe it's not real for me yet because I'm still undecided on where I'll be going, and more focused on class and figuring out how best to use the summer for leisure. Definitely excited though!

I'd be interested to know how you feel after you pick! It's so great to have options!

I've read so much about the horror that is medicine (education/practice) on the internet and these forums, but I've also heard great things and personally only know people who really enjoy what they do, so I'm trying to balance my optimism -- there will be crap, but there's a lot to look forward to as well.

The negative stories definitely linger in my brain and I guess have come up more recently for me too. I just keep thinking about "what if that happens to me? What if I feel that way eventually?" I also know a lot of great physicians though and they seem to be doing really well and enjoy what they do. They have incredible passion at work every day and I can't wait to have that!
 
My experience has been great! I think people with negative experiences are more likely to share them online. People who integrate well probably don't come back to update SDN (with exceptions obviously). I found academically it's been way easier than expected. I found the material easier than upper year science classes, despite being out of school for years. I do miss my paycheck and where I used to live though.
 
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All new endeavors are fraught with anxiety.


Any other older non-trads starting to get nervous about leaving life as we know it to start on this new adventure of med school?

I am so grateful for this opportunity, but a little bit nervous about exchanging my small paycheck and lifestyle (modest as it is) for the life of a student and the debt of a student. There are so many unknowns ahead. I am also nervous that the length of training will feel more and more overwhelming once we get in the middle of it.

Perhaps biology is just kicking in and letting me know I am entering uncharted territory? I would love to hear how other non-trads are feeling.
 
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Ok how is it a few months in?!

For me, the hardest thing was re-learning how to study and take tests. That first semester, I knew if I could pass biochemistry I'd make it through the rest of medical school. It's been hard work. (second year was extremely exhausting - if I had it to do over again I'd skip classes, do the online version, and sleep more). If I was where you are now and knew what I'd have to go through, it would be worth it. I love where I am in 4th year.

Take a deep breath, enjoy the next year, and get ready for a marathon.
 
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It's going well! Every day I am learning interesting aspects of science and how to take care of patients. It's exactly what I imagined, but also more intense than I imagined! The pancake analogy is spot on. I am currently 3 days of pancakes behind! :wideyed: I am feeling less nervous about my career change, but also feeling the increasing time commitment and stress of school. One incredibly reassuring aspect is that there are so many other students who feel exactly the same way I do. I've made a bunch of new friends and I'm excited to see where we all end up.
 
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It's going well! Every day I am learning interesting aspects of science and how to take care of patients. It's exactly what I imagined, but also more intense than I imagined! The pancake analogy is spot on. I am currently 3 days of pancakes behind! :wideyed: I am feeling less nervous about my career change, but also feeling the increasing time commitment and stress of school. One incredibly reassuring aspect is that there are so many other students who feel exactly the same way I do. I've made a bunch of new friends and I'm excited to see where we all end up.

Great, thanks for sharing your thoughts! What school are you at? Is it pass/fail? And I just read up on the pancake analogy -- too funny :)
 
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1. Everyone in medical school was in the top of their undergrad class and are type A. You likely won't be in the top anymore.
3. If you have a family, it's OK to have some C's and be with your kids. Board scores are the most important.
7. If you find yourself struggling be sure to ask for help EARLY. This includes your mental health as well as your classes.
8. Do NOT pull all nighters, get enough sleep.
These are incredibly true for people like myself. Seriously, wiser words have never been spoken.

1. I'm doing what I consider fairly well, but I'm not in the 10% of my class that seems to get 96-100% on exams. And I don't care. I have a good balance going and don't kill myself studying and the end result will be basically the same.

3. I make it a point to see my family for at least one dedicated hour (sometimes more) every day. And I get most weekends off, so I can spend them watching my kid while my wife works. If I end up with a C in biochem, so be it...I'll still have a great home and family life (all circumstances considered).

7. I talked to my school's (fantastic) learning specialists the second week, before I had a chance to really make any study habits. And it worked well. Also, I started using the counseling service a few weeks ago and it's been great.

8. I will NEVER pull an all nighter if I can AT ALL avoid it. I've worked jobs requiring 24 hour shifts and overnight work, so I'm not averse to it from that angle. I just think that if I were to spend 8 hours studying overnight instead of sleeping, the returns would be incredibly miniscule and totally not worth it. I'm in bed by midnight at the latest every night, and feel significantly less zombie-like than many of my peers appear.

@cabinbuilder hit it on the head here.

Edit: auto-correct correction.
 
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