Any thoughts on the future of ENDO now that rotary and implants are so common?

ostooth

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Just wondering if anyone had any opinions as to where Endo will be heading in the future. I've heard from GP's and aegd residents that rotary makes endo "so easy it should be a crime!" I can see how endo is still doing well since older GP's haven't all caught on to rotary but what about all the new grads who are trained w/ new techniques (gutta purcha carriers, etc..) that are starting to practice? Sure there are plenty of endo cases out there for everyone but I can see the number of complicated endo referrals dropping further and further.
Not to mention that implant placement is quickly on the rise and success rates are supposedly extremely high.

any thoughts?
 

SPBest

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That is an interesting thought that will cause a lot of contoversy. There will always be a need for endodontists. Why? Because as GP's do more and more of their own endo (which I think is great, I plan to) there will likely be more instrument seperations, and there will always be canals that are too calcified or curved to navigate unless you are extremely proficient in RCT. I also plan to refer those "problem" patients who need endo treatment. Don't forget that while RCT is the bread and butter of an endo practice, there are other things they do.

As far as implants taking a slice of the endo pie, I hope that never happens. The best implant is a natural tooth. If the tooth can be salvaged, do it. Leave the implants for cases where the prognosis of the tooth is hopeless or nearly so.
 

mam2004

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SPBest said:
That is an interesting thought that will cause a lot of contoversy. There will always be a need for endodontists. Why? Because as GP's do more and more of their own endo (which I think is great, I plan to) there will likely be more instrument seperations, and there will always be canals that are too calcified or curved to navigate unless you are extremely proficient in RCT. I also plan to refer those "problem" patients who need endo treatment. Don't forget that while RCT is the bread and butter of an endo practice, there are other things they do.

As far as implants taking a slice of the endo pie, I hope that never happens. The best implant is a natural tooth. If the tooth can be salvaged, do it. Leave the implants for cases where the prognosis of the tooth is hopeless or nearly so.
i agree with you, and also realize that though there will be some amount of referals to the endodontist, that number will grdually decrease over a couple of years, however, that number will NEVER touch zero, as an endodontist(specialist) is always a specialist! he will certainly be able to do something additional or exceptional which a gp can never do!
 

Fullosseousflap

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Yes, less Heroic endo and more extractions and immediate placement and loading of implants.

Already seeing that in clinical practice.

Pre-doctoral programs in implant surgery will be commonplace within five years.

But, my prediction is that dental school will stretch out to five years - with no clinical licensure exam within seven years!
 

HuyetKiem

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Fullosseousflap said:
Pre-doctoral programs in implant surgery will be commonplace within five years.
!
In progress at Case dental school.

Noting that almost every practicing dentist should offer the great benefits of dental implants, he wants that skill—now routine mainly for postgraduate students—to become integrated into the undergraduate program at Case and a new educational standard for undergraduates.
 

ItsGavinC

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Fullosseousflap said:
In place at USC!

What about the rest?
We've had a brief implants course. Treatment planning a patient is another story, but that'll happen soon enough.
 

aphistis

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We'll get at least one semester on implants sometime next year, but I'm not sure beyond that.
 

DcS

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In place at UNC.

We have a very extensive course on implants, on 2 sytems specifically: Astratech and ITI Strauman. We learn everything from case selection/planning, implant placement, impression techniques, implant-retained overdentures, etc etc. These 2 companies both visit us on separate days to guide us through the use of their systems. They also both provide most implant products to the undergrad clinic free of charge, reducing the costs of a single implant to around 1200 dollars. This is a ridiculous deal which many of my patients take advantage of.

As undergrads unfortunately we are not allowed to do the actual implant placement surgery. We do the initial workup, stent fabrication and get a tomo taken...at which point we meet with a perio or OMS resident who will do the sx for the consult. After they place the actual implant, we undergrads then get to place the abutment and crown.

While I do agree that nothing can replace a natural tooth, when a patient is looking at endo, a crown lengthening surgery, post and core, and then a crown....all of which can fail for numerous reasons, I advise them to get the implant. It's equal cost size with all of those procedures together and has a much better prognosis.
 

SLIMDEETS

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Fullosseousflap said:
Yes, less Heroic endo and more extractions and immediate placement and loading of implants.

Already seeing that in clinical practice.

Pre-doctoral programs in implant surgery will be commonplace within five years.

But, my prediction is that dental school will stretch out to five years - with no clinical licensure exam within seven years!
No clinical licensure exam within seven years! Give your head a shake clown :smuggrin: :smuggrin:
 

Fullosseousflap

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SLIMDEETS said:
No clinical licensure exam within seven years! Give your head a shake clown :smuggrin: :smuggrin:
A shake clown?

Remember I am old and do not know al of your smiley terms.

New York State already has implemented the no clinical exam deal, accepting instead an additional year of training.

Thus, with the five year rule of continuous practice you can apply to most states for their license, including California (exceptions being Florida, Hawaii and Virginia?)
 

Biogirl361

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HuyetKiem said:
In progress at Case dental school.
do you know if this class will be part of the curriculum by the time my class (class of 2009) is a D3 or D4? i hope so, that would be nice :)
 

HuyetKiem

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Biogirl361 said:
do you know if this class will be part of the curriculum by the time my class (class of 2009) is a D3 or D4? i hope so, that would be nice :)

D4 could do everything now except placing actual implant with surgery. Friend of mine in D4 class did 3 cases this semester.
 

Biogirl361

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HuyetKiem said:
D4 could do everything now except placing actual implant with surgery. Friend of mine in D4 class did 3 cases this semester.
so, i might be misunderstanding the thread but were you saying they are going to implement a course on the surgical placement for pre-docs?
 

HuyetKiem

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Biogirl361 said:
so, i might be misunderstanding the thread but were you saying they are going to implement a course on the surgical placement for pre-docs?
From what I heard, they are trying to incoporate into our curriculum. Don't know when ...