Aug 15, 2012
9
9
Mobile, AL
Status
Pre-Medical
I realize that the new MCAT is going to be different, but if anybody is interested in the PowerPoint slides I made for studying for the "old" MCAT, I can set up a Dropbox account. They're mostly filled with basic formulas/equations, dimensions, math tricks, and molecular structures. No idea if they would be of any help on the new exam, but it seemed wrong to let nearly 750 slides go to waste.
 
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sharkbyte

Take me to the top
5+ Year Member
Dec 27, 2013
1,186
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Medical Student
I'd be interested! Just out of curiosity, how did you do?
 

Jumb0

5+ Year Member
Aug 24, 2012
239
111
USA
Status
Pre-Medical
I would love some slides!

I am taking the MCAT in a couple weeks
 
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JLSant
Aug 15, 2012
9
9
Mobile, AL
Status
Pre-Medical
Hey! Not selling - it's totally free. I'll set up the account and link it for you guys ASAP. And as far as how I've done - I'm taking the test on the 21st, so wish me well! But scoring mid-30s on my AAMC FLs.
 
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JLSant
Aug 15, 2012
9
9
Mobile, AL
Status
Pre-Medical
Okay, I'll link below. Before I do, though, just want to say two things: 1) I was pretty meticulous about pulling everything directly from a reputable source (mostly TBR), but I am human and make mistakes, and 2) If you find a mistake, please let me know so I can fix it for others. Obviously, once you download it, it's yours to do with as you please. Hope it helps!

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/q6cotb7nof3nfcr/AABHsoFKKhacmMtlMq0cf3pga?dl=0
 

Cawolf

Medical Student
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Feb 27, 2013
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2,150
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Downloaded and looks awesome - I like the pictures!

Will browse through as review in free time.

Thanks.
 
Oct 5, 2013
59
23
Status
Pre-Medical
Never mind ignore my previous comment lol. The work formula on inclined plane is in absence of friction right. I was thinking of calculating work due to friction on an inclined plane, which then would be cos.
 
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JLSant
Aug 15, 2012
9
9
Mobile, AL
Status
Pre-Medical
Realized I left my old (and very poorly explained) thin film interference slide on this document. I would delete the pics/orange comments and replace them with this comment I pulled from MedPR on SDN:

Say you have air (n=1), water (n=1.3), and glass (n=1.5) all stacked on one another. When the light hits the air-water barrier, some will reflect and some will refract into the water. The light that reflects will undergo a 180 degree phase change. When the refracted light hits the water-glass barrier, some will again reflect and some will refract. The light that reflects will undergo a 180 degree phase change and re-enter the air at the air-water barrier. This light ray will constructively interfere with the ray that originally reflected at the air-water barrier since both rays underwent a 180 degree phase change. If the glass had a lower index of refraction than water, however, the light reflected at the water-glass barrier would not have undergone a 180 degree phase change and once it passed back up into the air, it would destructively interfere with the ray originally reflected at the air-water interface.

upload_2014-10-14_7-12-43.png
 
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