dbutz02

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I applied for the HSPS and in the middle of the process started having doubts but didn't want to limit my options and went ahead and submitted the application. I just recently got news of my acceptance into the program and I've decided I don't want to do it. I realized my main motives were finacially based and that isn't the right reason.
So any advice on how to tell my recruiter that I don't want it?
 

chopper

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Just tell him. By honest and respectful, but it's your life. As long as you have not signed anything or taken the oath (and even then in some circumstances if you haven't taken any money) - you are not obligated. He may act hurt, try to give you the hardsell, whatever - you are adding to his quota after all - but don't fall for it.
 
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dbutz02

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chopper said:
Just tell him. By honest and respectful, but it's your life... He may act hurt, try to give you the hardsell, whatever - you are adding to his quota after all - but don't fall for it.
Yeah I figured that's the best idea. Thanks for the advice. It's sort of hard to turn down a scholarship that would be worth over 200k but I really don't think it will be worth it in the long run.
 

Larsitron

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Yeah, I was in a similar spot with the Army and just looked out at the future and decided that it wasn't the direction I wanted to go. But just be honest and just be sincere. They're probably going to make you feel bad leaving the recruiting office (I know I did) but its your life and its your choice.
 

Sarikate

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I'm meeting with a recruiter next week...what do you guys think are the CONS for going this route?
 

YzIa

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Sarikate said:
I'm meeting with a recruiter next week...what do you guys think are the CONS for going this route?
The obvious CONs are the odds of having to do a military residency (though not obligated), having to attend officer training over one of the summers, having to commit 4 years post residency to practing as a military doctor - no guarantees of where you will be posted or at war, etc., no guarantee that you will be allowed to leave the military after 4 years if in crisis state.
 

NeuroSync

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Sarikate, I was in the JAG Corps as the hospital attorney for a major Army teaching hospital. Perhaps my observations will help you.

There are some GREAT beneifts for taking this. You come out debt free, AND you have money to live on. What a deal. The military residencies are among the best in the country. Military doctors do very well on the boards. You will be given time to study for them, too. You will get professional pay and bonuses that will bring you above $100K per year, but don't expect to be paid what your counterparts are being paid. On the other hand, you won't have any student loans to pay. You will also have 30 days paid vacation per year plus a bunch of holidays.

The other sweet thing is that they will pay for you to go all over the place for roations. How 'bout Hawaii for a few months. Your housing, transportation, and everything is taken care of. Your salary as a resident is WAY higher than your counterparts.

The downside is that you are a soldier. You have to go where and when they tell you. You have to play all of the stupid games that they play. You may have a boss that you hate and you cannot even say anything about it. If you do, you may face military punishment. They OWN you. You could get deployed...They could have a stop loss when your time is up and tell you that you cannot leave. You could get out and be recalled, just as you get a private practice established. On the other hand, you are doing a service to you country.

There are definite trade-offs here, as you can see. If I can answer any specific questions, I will try.
 

CaliGrl80

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I was considering doing the HPSP route at one time but I changed my mind when I interviewed at USUHS. They told me that all the students at USUHS get first choice of residencies and then the HPSP students get whatever is left over. This didn't sound good to me. I decided that if I was gonna do the Military route then I would go to USUHS. I still haven't decided if the military if for me but I am still considering attending USUHS.
 

choip0817

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I also applied for USUHS and HPSP for both the Air Force and Navy. I got accepted into all three, but turned down everything when I decided not to join the military. I realized that although it sounds great now, none of it really effects your life until about four years down the line, and things change. And it's definately easier to join the military later through FAP than it is to quit the military. That, and I was not looking forward to having George W. Bush as my boss.
 
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dbutz02

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I just rejected the HPSP and you were right they made me feel bad when I left the office but apparently most people who reject it just stop returning phone calls...says something about their integrity. Anyways I think this program could be good for some individuals it just wasn't right for me.