Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Dismiss Notice
Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.

Anyone here letting the military pay for Medschool??

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Future_Doc, May 14, 2002.

  1. Future_Doc

    Future_Doc Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2001
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is actually something that I found interesting, but with a family and all, I wasn't sure I wanted to spend the time away from home,or have to move them. It sure is intriguing enough, though. I like the idea of not having to pay back $1 billion in student loans (slight embellishment, but you get the picture).
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Dr. Will

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    6,053
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I have an application partially filled out. If I get an acceptance I might do it, but I'm not sure yet. It's a huge decision that I'm not ready to make yet.
     
  4. none

    none 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2001
    Messages:
    1,903
    Likes Received:
    5
    If you feel like the military is for you, then go for it, but it really wouldn't be saving you any money. Private physicians simply don't have problems repaying loans.
     
  5. efex101

    efex101 attending
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2002
    Messages:
    2,713
    Likes Received:
    74
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Join the military because you *want* to be in the military, not for the sole purpose of paying off loans (not implying that this is your intention). The military is great when there are no wars and you are just working but when war breaks out it is not pretty and if you have a family it can be very difficult. I am talking from experience so make sure that this is something that you really want to do. Also remember that when it comes time for residency and let's say you want to do dermatology, the military may not need any at that time and you may be stuck doing something that is not your cup of tea. Good luck!
     
  6. johnM

    johnM Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2002
    Messages:
    403
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree with the above posters, you should only consider the military if you really want to be in the military. Doing it (or not doing it) for the money is silly, you should do what is going to make you happy, as you will be paid enough to live comfortably either way.

    Personally, I really want to travel and work as a doctor in other countries. I could not do this if I had $250K of debt, since I would need to be paid good american money for my loans. The military is going to give me a way to travel, and still be paid well, with no loans to boot. As for a war breaking out, this may be very unlikely, but you still need to consider it. I can tell you that when the whole 9/11 thing went down, there was nothing more that I would rather do than go to the Middle East and treat the US soldiers who were kicking terrorist ass.
     
  7. edmadison

    edmadison 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2001
    Messages:
    2,086
    Likes Received:
    70
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I'm letting the Army pay my way (Hu-ah). I agree with the previous posters. If you are predisposed the military it is a fantasic deal.

    There are huge benefits and some pretty big draw backs. For me, it was an easy decision. For others, its harder.

    Ed
     
  8. johnM

    johnM Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2002
    Messages:
    403
    Likes Received:
    0
    Where do you go to school Ed? I'm starting at USUHS (also Army - Hoo-ah!) next year, and can't wait for OBC this summer.
     
  9. KDocGirl

    KDocGirl Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2001
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    I thought about the military scholarship too and did some thorough "interrogation" with financial reps. My reasoning for NOT doing it is that I'm not POSITIVE on doing family medicine or general med, so it isn't worth it to me to cut all my choices before I even do my rotations. Plus, I don't want to be bound to some remote military base to do my residency. But, like the previous posters mentioned, if you want to be in the military, then it's a great way to kill two birds with one stone.
     
  10. Pawnym

    Pawnym Five Twos?
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    2
    I'm still contemplating whether or not to go for it(tho I have 2 years til med school so no biggie). The main drawback is with the match. Well, the military also has the FAP programs thingie(I forget what FAP stands for). Basically, once you're in residency or have been accepted into a residency, you apply, and if you're accepted they pay you 1058.00(somethin like that) per month plus an additional 22379.00 annually to help pay back your loans, and this is all in addition to what you make as a resident. I don't think you get BAH/food allowances but you do still get the military insurance plus they reimburse you for some job related stuffs.

    The drawback.

    You owe them 2 years for your first year of residency and 1 year per resident year thereafter. So with a 3 yr residency you are obligated 4 years(Just like HPSP would). If you have a longer residency, you owe more years but hey, at least you got to use the civilian match. :) Plus you're still gettin that 34k per year extra(approximately) to stick towards loans. So it's not so bad a deal if you know you want to doctor some in the military and utilize the civie match.

    :D

    somfin to think bout.
     
  11. Rapid Decomposition

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2002
    Messages:
    410
    Likes Received:
    0
    What do you guys know about those military scholarships that let you go to any med school you want for free? My dad and brother are both in the military (Ret. Air Force and Navy respectively), so my dad is really pushing me to take the military route. Bethesda is simply out of the question for me personally, but I thought I remembered that the military scholarships have a much smaller active duty payback time. Does anybody know anything about these?
     
  12. Rapid Decomposition

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2002
    Messages:
    410
    Likes Received:
    0
    Geez I'm stupid. The post right before mine answered my question. Never mind!
     
  13. KDocGirl

    KDocGirl Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2001
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    Plus, you have to tell them what field you are going into, and you must stick to that. Otherwise, there's a penalty, and you may have to pay all the scholarship money.
     
  14. edmadison

    edmadison 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2001
    Messages:
    2,086
    Likes Received:
    70
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by KDocGirl:
    <strong>I thought about the military scholarship too and did some thorough "interrogation" with financial reps. My reasoning for NOT doing it is that I'm not POSITIVE on doing family medicine or general med, so it isn't worth it to me to cut all my choices before I even do my rotations. Plus, I don't want to be bound to some remote military base to do my residency. But, like the previous posters mentioned, if you want to be in the military, then it's a great way to kill two birds with one stone.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Although I do think there are drawbacks to the program, I'd like to correct a few of these comments. First of all (at least for the Army), almost all of the military residencies are at large teaching hospitals. These are in Washington D.C., San Antonio Texas, El Paso Texas, Tacoma Washington, Honolulu Hawaii and Augusta Georgia (ok, that is remote). There are also some family practice and ER programs in smaller locations. The Army does not pigeon whole people into FP/IM, there are many specialty programs. The only real shortcomming is the puacity of neurosurgery (one residency slot for the entire military) - other than that, at least for the Army, you can do almost anything.

    John M: I go to the University of Rochester and went to OBC last summer. It was a blast, but make sure you drive there.

    Ed
     
  15. edmadison

    edmadison 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2001
    Messages:
    2,086
    Likes Received:
    70
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Pawnym:
    <strong>The drawback [of FAP].

    You owe them 2 years for your first year of residency and 1 year per resident year thereafter. So with a 3 yr residency you are obligated 4 years(Just like HPSP would). If you have a longer residency, you owe more years but hey, at least you got to use the civilian match. :) Plus you're still gettin that 34k per year extra(approximately) to stick towards loans. So it's not so bad a deal if you know you want to doctor some in the military and utilize the civie match.

    :D

    somfin to think bout.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Sorry to double post, but you forgot to factor in one huge thing. The money in the FAP is all taxable -- in HPSP the scholarship is not. Thus, your $23,000 tuition stipend becomes much less.

    Ed
     
  16. Pawnym

    Pawnym Five Twos?
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    2
    blah blah, almost everything is taxable these days. :) It's still something nice if you want military medicine but are far too wary of miltary match to go for HPSP.

    good point tho
     

Share This Page