Anyone scored mid 20's in all practice tests..

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

TXtaco25

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Messages
56
Reaction score
0
..and then score high 20's or even a 30? I am scared because with all of the studying and preparing I have done, I have averaged between a 24-26 on all of my practice test...and my actual test is on the 29th. I really don't know what to do. Just got to be confident in my abilities. I know those aamc practice scores aren't predicative I feel of my actual knowledge and abilities.

Just curious if there has been anyone who has been in a similar spot.

I hope I don't have to void....

Members don't see this ad.
 
..and then score high 20's or even a 30? I am scared because with all of the studying and preparing I have done, I have averaged between a 24-26 on all of my practice test...and my actual test is on the 29th. I really don't know what to do. Just got to be confident in my abilities. I know those aamc practice scores aren't predicative I feel of my actual knowledge and abilities.

Just curious if there has been anyone who has been in a similar spot.

I hope I don't have to void....

I hate to break it to you but i think the consensus on this thread is that the AAMC tests are indicative of how well you will do +/- 2 or 3 points so just stay positive and keep studying and if your scores aren't where you want them to be, reschedule. Im thinking about doing the same thing. There is no sense in taking this test when you are not ready just for the sake of taking it, bc its 250 down the drain plus another time through of studying. Seriously, be realistic and be honest with yourself. If was tough for me, but it seems like the logical thing to do and most people who have taken it would agree with me.
 
..and then score high 20's or even a 30? I am scared because with all of the studying and preparing I have done, I have averaged between a 24-26 on all of my practice test...and my actual test is on the 29th. I really don't know what to do. Just got to be confident in my abilities. I know those aamc practice scores aren't predicative I feel of my actual knowledge and abilities.

Just curious if there has been anyone who has been in a similar spot.

I hope I don't have to void....
hey, I am in the same situation with you. I am also thinking what I should do also. Are you planning to apply this year? I was originally gonna apply this cycle and now I don't feel ready so not sure what to do :(
 
..and then score high 20's or even a 30? I am scared because with all of the studying and preparing I have done, I have averaged between a 24-26 on all of my practice test...and my actual test is on the 29th. I really don't know what to do. Just got to be confident in my abilities. I know those aamc practice scores aren't predicative I feel of my actual knowledge and abilities.

Just curious if there has been anyone who has been in a similar spot.

I hope I don't have to void....

I had a friend who averaged 23-24 on all the AAMC's. He also took TPR class. He scored a 26 on the actual MCAT.
He applied that year with a 3.8 cGPA and got accepted to most med-schools. He had a bunch of ECs, good LORs, and lots of shadowing/volunteering experience. He was also president of a health organization. Not sure if that worked in his favor :)
 
Members don't see this ad :)
I had a friend who averaged 23-24 on all the AAMC's. He also took TPR class. He scored a 26 on the actual MCAT.
He applied that year with a 3.8 cGPA and got accepted to most med-schools. He had a bunch of ECs, good LORs, and lots of shadowing/volunteering experience. He was also president of a health organization. Not sure if that worked in his favor :)

just to clarify, did your friend get into most allopathic med schools or was it osteopathic? I could see him getting into a bunch of osteopathic schools with a 26 but that's pretty lucky/awesome if he got into most allopathic schools.
 
If you are getting a 24-26 on the AAMCs, you are missing some content or test taking skills. Do a thorough review of everything before taking another exam. The consensus here like others have said is that the real thing is similar to the AAMCs score-wise but difficulty wise the real thing is (in my opinion) miles more challenging than the AAMC exams posted online. I say this not to discourage you, but to let you know that you should really make sure you don't have any holes in your prep going into the exam. Going into the exam for the first time in April I averaged 29-31 on the practice tests and got a 24 on the real deal. Just something to keep in mind...
 
I would take it. Worst case scenario you take it again and have "real" mcat experience best case scenario you get lucky.
 
I think hitting mid-20s ALL practice exams is telling you you aren't probably going to get above 30.

To get a 30 or higher on the real thing, I personally think you need a average of all AAMCs to be at LEAST in the 28-29s.
 
this is inane advice.

How so? The test is in 2 days. The only choices the OP has is to take it and possibly get lucky, void, or not show up and throw away the $$. Who knows, maybe they get a test with material that they know and feel really good about it.
 
How so? The test is in 2 days. The only choices the OP has is to take it and possibly get lucky, void, or not show up and throw away the $$. Who knows, maybe they get a test with material that they know and feel really good about it.
you should never use the actual mcat as a let-me-wing-it practice. please refrain from giving out terrible advice.
 
you should never use the actual mcat as a let-me-wing-it practice. please refrain from giving out terrible advice.

Just to clarify, you are suggesting he should throw away the $240 he spent and skip the exam?

OP, if you can score in the low range of your practice scores on the MCAT, you will still have the opportunity to become a physician (DO). It will be an uphill battle but someone will accept you with a 24, as long as the rest of your app is solid. You must feel confident going into the test. Go in believing you will not have to take it again. Get a good night of sleep, feel confident, and take the test. If you do all of that, your score should be able to take you somewhere. Good luck.
 
you should never use the actual mcat as a let-me-wing-it practice. please refrain from giving out terrible advice.

So what's good advice oh wise one? Don't show up and throw away the money spent on the exam? All I'm saying is if the OP feels really good about it he could get a 26-27 (consesus is +/- 2,3 points) and possibly get in this cycle. Or OP can void and try again next year.
 
So what's good advice oh wise one? Don't show up and throw away the money spent on the exam? All I'm saying is if the OP feels really good about it he could get a 26-27 (consesus is +/- 2,3 points) and possibly get in this cycle. Or OP can void and try again next year.
Just to clarify, you are suggesting he should throw away the $240 he spent and skip the exam?
yes that's exactly what i'm saying, because a terrible score on the MCAT is something no amount of money, let alone $240, can erase. what none of you polyannas seem to consider is that it's just as likely, if not more so, that the OP will score a 20 on the real deal than above his average.

not to be too much of an ass, but i have to ask what either of your qualifications are, other than just having an opinion. have you even taken the MCAT? applied to schools? to put all my cards on the table i knocked the actual exam out of the park and i've taught this test for 2+ years
 
Members don't see this ad :)
Hey guys I really appreciate the advice. For the record, i have gone over my aamc practice tests and have come to the conclusion that I usually missed 3-4 because of "dumb" mistakes, i.e. not reading the question right, or making a question much harder. I also had 1-2 of just not remembering the material. However, from the time I started taking the aamc practice tests, every weekend for the past 2 and half months, I feel like my knowledge of the material has grown tremendously, especially in the last 2 and a half weeks (remember my test is the 30th), so I probably have not been able to reap all the benefits of that.

I also have taken some kaplan and TPR practice tests, and have scored between 29-32.

Bottom line is yes, I am discouraged by my aamc practice scores, but I feel like I am really not that far off. Question really is should I follow my upward trend into the real deal or not. A tough question indeed since this test is definitely make or break for me. I feel like I can get those 3-4 questions right on my real test, that cost me the 2 points on the practice test scores.
 
OP,

If you are applying this cycle you will have at most only 2 opportunities left if you do not take the exam in the 29th.

You should not score your exam on the 29th unless you are ready, however since you have already paid you should take the exam and void. You will learn how difficult the real exam is.

Also, you need not worry that this "Practice Session" (voiding the real thing) will cut into your allotted 3 MCAT's per year because you will have at most only 2 more opportunities to take the MCAT for this year's application cycle. If you are unaware you are only allowed to take the MCAT 3 times per year.
 
yes that's exactly what i'm saying, because a terrible score on the MCAT is something no amount of money, let alone $240, can erase. what none of you polyannas seem to consider is that it's just as likely, if not more so, that the OP will score a 20 on the real deal than above his average.

not to be too much of an ass, but i have to ask what either of your qualifications are, other than just having an opinion. have you even taken the MCAT? applied to schools? to put all my cards on the table i knocked the actual exam out of the park and i've taught this test for 2+ years

I'm not suggesting he blindly take the exam and hope that he miraculously "knocks it out of the park". I'm saying that he DEFINITELY needs to show up to the exam because he's already paid for it, and MAYBE submit if he feels fantastic about it. If not, then void and it won't change a thing. He can retake it again in august or september but another thing that hasn't been taken into consideration is that if he's applying in Texas (and I assume he is), then any score from august or september would put him at such a huge disadvantage.

The only bad advice given in this thread is that the OP skip an exam that's already paid for.
 
hello everyone! First off, I'll say good luck with everyone applying. I am true underdog when it comes to applying to medical schools. I have taken the MCAT twice in the span of a year, and my score actually went down from a 22 to a 20. I studied, but was also distracted with family troubles and other school work. I have a decent GPA 3.55 (overall), and 3.45 (sciences). I have enormous amount of volunteer experience both medical and community oriented. I have also worked in a hospital as a Nurse tech for over a year. I'm a very dedicated individual, so I'm just stress as to why I can't do well on the MCAT. I'm scheduled to take the mcat in the next few weeks, and I'm scoring 24-27 range on my practice tests. Should I take it? What do you think I need to make to get into an MD school? DO school?

I am almost done with my application for this cycle both allo and osteopathic, and I donno if I should send in my application. I don't want to waste my money applying now if I can't get in. What do you guys think I should do?
 
yes that's exactly what i'm saying, because a terrible score on the MCAT is something no amount of money, let alone $240, can erase. what none of you polyannas seem to consider is that it's just as likely, if not more so, that the OP will score a 20 on the real deal than above his average.

not to be too much of an ass, but i have to ask what either of your qualifications are, other than just having an opinion. have you even taken the MCAT? applied to schools? to put all my cards on the table i knocked the actual exam out of the park and i've taught this test for 2+ years

019a8_smug-alert-south-park.jpg
 
I'm not suggesting he blindly take the exam and hope that he miraculously "knocks it out of the park". I'm saying that he DEFINITELY needs to show up to the exam because he's already paid for it, and MAYBE submit if he feels fantastic about it. If not, then void and it won't change a thing. He can retake it again in august or september but another thing that hasn't been taken into consideration is that if he's applying in Texas (and I assume he is), then any score from august or september would put him at such a huge disadvantage.

The only bad advice given in this thread is that the OP skip an exam that's already paid for.
this more than anything confirms that you truly have no idea what you're talking about. your "feeling" about how you did on the MCAT is a terrible judge of how you actually did.

my questsion still stand, have you actually even taken this thing?
 
this more than anything confirms that you truly have no idea what you're talking about. your "feeling" about how you did on the MCAT is a terrible judge of how you actually did.

my questsion still stand, have you actually even taken this thing?

While that may be true for high scores, I'd say it's very possible to know if you did +/- a 26 like OP would have to do on test day. If he knows the answer to most of the questions and doesn't skip any whole passages then the odds of getting a poor score are greatly reduced. On the other hand, if OP gets shellshocked by a crazy PS passage and it just goes downhill from there then just cut the losses and void. I would know the difference between a 24 and a 30 on a practice test, why wouldn't it work for the real thing? I will admit that the odds of "feeling good" about the test are pretty small but I'm trying to be positive and provide an answer to the OP's original question of what he should expect on the real thing. A 28+ is reasonable with some luck based on the practice test info.
 
While that may be true for high scores, I'd say it's very possible to know if you did +/- a 26 like OP would have to do on test day. If he knows the answer to most of the questions and doesn't skip any whole passages then the odds of getting a poor score are greatly reduced. On the other hand, if OP gets shellshocked by a crazy PS passage and it just goes downhill from there then just cut the losses and void. I would know the difference between a 24 and a 30 on a practice test, why wouldn't it work for the real thing? I will admit that the odds of "feeling good" about the test are pretty small but I'm trying to be positive and provide an answer to the OP's original question of what he should expect on the real thing. A 28+ is reasonable with some luck based on the practice test info.
you never know the answer on the MCAT. you think you know. and especially if you're scoring in the 20s, what you think you know is often incorrect.

also, to repeat one last time, if a 28+ is reasonable with some luck, a 22- is just as reasonable. why is this consistently ignored?
 
Last edited:
This is like Pee-Wee Herman and Arnold Schwarzenegger both giving me work-out advice. I'll trust the guy with the 40+.
 
This is like Pee-Wee Herman and Arnold Schwarzenegger both giving me work-out advice. I'll trust the guy with the 40+.


Both arguments are valid, I don't necessarily blindly follow the advice with the "40+" guy argument because of their status, I just look at the advice individually.

But in this case, I do agree that it is best to be prepared and take the exam. It is not best to be unprepared and hope for the right exam, regardless of your registration issues.

With all that said, I would probably go sit the exam but not score it. It would be like a practice exam I didn't score. I can see both arguments though.
 
This is like Pee-Wee Herman and Arnold Schwarzenegger both giving me work-out advice. I'll trust the guy with the 40+.

Actually, that's a pretty good analogy. No matter who you take the advice from you're still never going to come close to looking like Arnold because he's an austrian genetic freak. The OP isn't going to get a 40+ or even 30+ and I never tried to argue that. All I'm saying is that the best chance that the OP has of getting into medical school this cycle is to get an upper 20's score as early as possible. If he takes it tomorrow, gets lucky, feels good about it, doesn't void, and gets a 28+, it would be better than skipping, studying more, taking a later test date, possibly getting a harder test, getting the same score and applying that much later. Like I said before, in Texas, most schools are winding down by September and if you submit your stuff late it can greatly decrease your chances to get noticed.
 
This is like Pee-Wee Herman and Arnold Schwarzenegger both giving me work-out advice. I'll trust the guy with the 40+.

Both arguments are valid, I don't necessarily blindly follow the advice with the "40+" guy argument because of their status, I just look at the advice individually.

+1, I would never expect anyone to follow anything I say unless it strikes them as true on the merit of the advice alone. I've been wrong often in the past and there's no reason it won't continue in the future. That being said, in this case I have to bring out the guns because it's obvious to me that the other advice being given is coming from absolutely no basis on reality or experience.


Actually, that's a pretty good analogy. No matter who you take the advice from you're still never going to come close to looking like Arnold because he's an austrian genetic freak. The OP isn't going to get a 40+ or even 30+ and I never tried to argue that. All I'm saying is that the best chance that the OP has of getting into medical school this cycle is to get an upper 20's score as early as possible. If he takes it tomorrow, gets lucky, feels good about it, doesn't void, and gets a 28+, it would be better than skipping, studying more, taking a later test date, possibly getting a harder test, getting the same score and applying that much later. Like I said before, in Texas, most schools are winding down by September and if you submit your stuff late it can greatly decrease your chances to get noticed.
or, under an equally if not more likely scenario, OP takes the test, feels like he got lucky, feels good about it, doesn't void, but turns out he got a 21. not only is he fcked for this cycle, he's in a hole for the next.

the analogy has more to do with the fact that arnold probably knows more about the matter than a guy who has never touched weights in his life.
 
+1, I would never expect anyone to follow anything I say unless it strikes them as true on the merit of the advice alone. I've been wrong often in the past and there's no reason it won't continue in the future. That being said, in this case I have to bring out the guns because it's obvious to me that the other advice being given is coming from absolutely no basis on reality or experience.

You have brought up the other side of the "analyzing advice" coin. First, don't agree blindly because of status, second, generally don't listen to keyboard jockeys who have read about something for years but have no real world experience and no business talking.
 
you never know the answer on the MCAT. you think you know. and especially if you're scoring in the 20s, what you think you know is often incorrect.

also, to repeat one last time, if a 28+ is reasonable with some luck, a 22- is just as reasonable. why is this consistently ignored?

+1:thumbup:

While that may be true for high scores, I'd say it's very possible to know if you did +/- a 26 like OP would have to do on test day. If he knows the answer to most of the questions and doesn't skip any whole passages then the odds of getting a poor score are greatly reduced. On the other hand, if OP gets shellshocked by a crazy PS passage and it just goes downhill from there then just cut the losses and void. I would know the difference between a 24 and a 30 on a practice test, why wouldn't it work for the real thing? I will admit that the odds of "feeling good" about the test are pretty small but I'm trying to be positive and provide an answer to the OP's original question of what he should expect on the real thing. A 28+ is reasonable with some luck based on the practice test info.

-1:thumbdown: I doubt that you've read multiple mcat club threads immediately post-test and post-score release. The majority are surprised by there actual scores whether it be positive or negative.
 
or, under an equally if not more likely scenario, OP takes the test, feels like he got lucky, feels good about it, doesn't void, but turns out he got a 21. not only is he fcked for this cycle, he's in a hole for the next.

the analogy has more to do with the fact that arnold probably knows more about the matter than a guy who has never touched weights in his life.

First of all, I don't believe it would be possible to actually feel good about an MCAT and get a 21. Second of all, based on the practice test results provided the OP is more than capable of getting a 28+. My advice is based solely on the opinion that his best chance of getting into med school this cycle is to ride on his good practice test scores and hope for the best. If he wants to ensure that he gets a 30+ by studying harder and taking the test in January/spring and taking a year off then fine.
 
First of all, I don't believe it would be possible to actually feel good about an MCAT and get a 21. Second of all, based on the practice test results provided the OP is more than capable of getting a 28+. My advice is based solely on the opinion that his best chance of getting into med school this cycle is to ride on his good practice test scores and hope for the best. If he wants to ensure that he gets a 30+ by studying harder and taking the test in January/spring and taking a year off then fine.
you would be wrong.
 
First of all, I don't believe it would be possible to actually feel good about an MCAT and get a 21. Second of all, based on the practice test results provided the OP is more than capable of getting a 28+. My advice is based solely on the opinion that his best chance of getting into med school this cycle is to ride on his good practice test scores and hope for the best. If he wants to ensure that he gets a 30+ by studying harder and taking the test in January/spring and taking a year off then fine.

I think the other thing to keep in mind here is the score we are talking about.

A 25 means you are missing a bunch of questions. It will probably be (according to AAMC practice exams):

PS - 17
BS - 20
VR - 13

Overall: 8/8/8

The person who misses this many questions could easily miss 3 or 4 more while FEELING they did just as well:

PS - 20
BS - 23
VR - 16

Overall: 7/7/7

How does he get a feel of only missing 17 vs 20 questions on a PS section?

If we were talking about a guy scoring higher, then I would agree you would have a better feel (but still tenuous at that).
 
In my defense, the test conditions I have used during these practice test have not been the greatest. The only true most like actual conditions I got was for my last PT ( #10), which I got a 26. Which, I know is not that great, but I was literally a question away from a 27. However, on that same test, I got a 10 on VR, but 8's on PS and BS. And supposably that is the more difficult test? On PT #9 I got a 10 on the PS, but 8's on VR and BS. On all the practice test before pt's 9-10, I was averaging around a 9, almost a 10 on BS.

I have taken the MCAT before, and my worst area going in was PS. I have definitely seen an increase in knowledge there ( got a 7 on 1st actual MCAT, averaged 1-2 points higher on all the PT's). I got an 11 on the VR reasoning of my actual last MCAT exam (which will be hard to duplicate I am sure). However, I got an 8 on the BR on my actual MCAT.

What I am basically trying to say is that during each of my practice exams I just couldn't seem to put it all together. I would do fairly well (for my standards) on one section or two, but be letdown by one or two other sections.

Stupid mistakes accounted for around 3-5 wrong answers on all of my practice tests.

My reasoning of why I think I am going to take the test tomorrow is

A) I am confident in my abilities and my knowledge, even though my practice test scores may not have shown that.

B) I think it is a good time for me to finally put it all together

C) I am crazy

In my mind right now I think I am going to get a 30. Am I? Who knows, but why pursue your dream if your not willing to take risk, and are not confident in what you can do?

I think tomorrow I am finally going to put it all together. I am not looking for 35's on up. I am looking for upper 20's-30 or low 30s. Scores, which I truly believe are attainable for me.

Call my crazy, ignorant, or stupid, but just don't call me scared.
 
Call my crazy, ignorant, or stupid, but just don't call me scared.

I feel like I'm in 'nam.

So you scored a 26 with an 11 in verbal, are sure you can't replicate the 11, and are aiming for high 20's with an average practice score at or below the 26 you already have?

I know you're a courageous individual, but it seems stupid to retake. I'm no authority, but I think a 26 by itself looks better than a 26 and a 28 together.
 
In my defense, the test conditions I have used during these practice test have not been the greatest. The only true most like actual conditions I got was for my last PT ( #10), which I got a 26. Which, I know is not that great, but I was literally a question away from a 27. However, on that same test, I got a 10 on VR, but 8's on PS and BS. And supposably that is the more difficult test? On PT #9 I got a 10 on the PS, but 8's on VR and BS. On all the practice test before pt's 9-10, I was averaging around a 9, almost a 10 on BS.

I have taken the MCAT before, and my worst area going in was PS. I have definitely seen an increase in knowledge there ( got a 7 on 1st actual MCAT, averaged 1-2 points higher on all the PT's). I got an 11 on the VR reasoning of my actual last MCAT exam (which will be hard to duplicate I am sure). However, I got an 8 on the BR on my actual MCAT.

What I am basically trying to say is that during each of my practice exams I just couldn't seem to put it all together. I would do fairly well (for my standards) on one section or two, but be letdown by one or two other sections.

Stupid mistakes accounted for around 3-5 wrong answers on all of my practice tests.

My reasoning of why I think I am going to take the test tomorrow is

A) I am confident in my abilities and my knowledge, even though my practice test scores may not have shown that.

B) I think it is a good time for me to finally put it all together

C) I am crazy

In my mind right now I think I am going to get a 30. Am I? Who knows, but why pursue your dream if your not willing to take risk, and are not confident in what you can do?

I think tomorrow I am finally going to put it all together. I am not looking for 35's on up. I am looking for upper 20's-30 or low 30s. Scores, which I truly believe are attainable for me.

Call my crazy, ignorant, or stupid, but just don't call me scared.
so to summarize, you've taken it before, and you're going to take it again. you have absolutely no history to tell you that you will actually break a 30, but you think you will. there's risk taking and there's reckless. good luck to you, because that's all you have going for yourself.
 
I would have to disagree with you, I think statistics show that your chances of getting in jump a good percentage by just going from a 26 to a 27. I would be satisfied with getting at least one point higher. I think Med Schools might look more favorably on a more rounded score (hypothetically speaking a 26 with 8,9,9 or a 27 with a 9,9,9) than the current score I have (7,8,11). That 7 is an absolute killer I think.

And going from a 26 to a 28 shows you put some effort in and got a positive increase. Any positive increase is a good increase, so again I would have to disagree with you.
 
Moral of the story: There is a reason the mean for the MCAT is a 25.

We start with the OP stating:

I have averaged between a 24-26 on all of my practice test

Questions that come to mind. Are these AAMC tests? Have they been taken more than once (since this is a re-take)?

In my defense, the test conditions I have used during these practice test have not been the greatest.

So you haven't been practicing properly? Ideal test conditions are a room with ear plugs and a computer.

got a 7 on 1st actual MCAT, averaged 1-2 points higher on all the PT's
So it appears that you are re-taking practice exams and scoring an average of 24-26.

What I am basically trying to say is that during each of my practice exams I just couldn't seem to put it all together. I would do fairly well (for my standards) on one section or two, but be letdown by one or two other sections.

You should expect to perform similarly on exam day.

To be honest. It doesn't appear that you have prepared well for the exam. You should go into the exam scoring on average what you'd like to see on test day. 5 point boosts are possible, but not likely.

On top of that, we know that you scored 1-2 points lower on your first MCAT than your averages in PS. This is a very real possibility.

If you go into the test and score it with a 25 again, that looks really bad. And going from a 26 to a 28 isn't really significant IMO, even if you balance out a bit (which would mean you got worse in a few sections and better in another).

[YOUTUBE]KX5jNnDMfxA[/YOUTUBE]
 
Bleargh and draper, if y'all don't mind me asking, where did/do y'all go to medical school?

I can't help I'm confident...
 
Also, draper, I respect your opinion when you say a 28 isn't much different than a 26. But that is also why your not on a med school ad com.
 
Bleargh and draper, if y'all don't mind me asking, where did/do y'all go to medical school?

I can't help I'm confident...
are you blind or are you trying to make a point of little relevance?

you're not confident, you're delusional. you have a sub 3 sGPA, already one mediocre MCAT, and yet you are convinced you will walk in and get lucky. christ. like i said, heaven to a walrus.
 
are you blind or are you trying to make a point of little relevance?

you're not confident, you're delusional. you have a sub 3 sGPA, already one mediocre MCAT, and yet you are convinced you will walk in and get lucky. christ. like i said, heaven to a walrus.

I lol'ed
 
Why do you guys care so much anyways? He's going to take the test so might as well wish him the best...
 
at this point, since nothing i say is getting through his taco shell head, it's mostly for the benefit of anyone else that may stumble through here.
 
Bleargh and draper, if y'all don't mind me asking, where did/do y'all go to medical school?

I don't know about Bleargh, but I went to STFU.

Why do you guys care so much anyways? He's going to take the test so might as well wish him the best...

I do wish him the best. My recommendation was to prepare well and don't expect miracles.
 
Top