Applying Out of State for Public Schools, what's the acceptable rate?

  • SDN Site Updates

    Hey everyone! The site will be down for approximately 2 hours on Thursday, August 5th for site updates.

  • How To ACE Your Medical School Interview

    In this webinar hosted by SDN with experts from BeMo Academic Consulting, you will learn a simple five-step process to help you translate your interview invitation into an acceptance.

jgalt42

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2009
231
2
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I'm going to be applying to some out of state medical schools that are public institutions. What do you guys consider is an acceptable rate of OOS to Total Class for this consideration? 15% 25% or 50%?

Thanks!
 

Jamie561

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 2, 2011
498
51
Status (Visible)
I'm going to be applying to some out of state medical schools that are public institutions. What do you guys consider is an acceptable rate of OOS to Total Class for this consideration? 15% 25% or 50%?

Thanks!

You can easily research this yourself. The number varies by institution

Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710e using Tapatalk
 

jgalt42

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2009
231
2
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
No, I have all the stats. What I mean is, at what proportion of the class size being out of state students would you make the cutoff to say that you would even start to consider apply to that school?

An extreme example would be like 4 out 200. In which case you wouldn't consider applying here.
 
About the Ads

galaxyx

Full Member
Feb 23, 2011
385
8
Status (Visible)
I think I've read 20%, but I guess lower would be ok if you were regional and/or had some ties to the area.
 

grt398

Fellow
10+ Year Member
Sep 17, 2008
237
81
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
If there's a school you're extremely interested in, even if the acceptance rate for OOS is very low, it's worth giving it a shot. I'll be attending a med school that accepted ~3% OOS last year. You should probably only have 1-2 schools like that on your list though.
 

pkwraith

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Apr 15, 2011
830
154
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
That's a question you really should be asking yourself. What one person considers is reasonable can be very different. It's highly subjective.

Just balance the percentage totals together so that you reach your target Overall Acceptance rate, while keeping the costs within your target budget allocation.
 

Jamie561

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 2, 2011
498
51
Status (Visible)
That's a question you really should be asking yourself. What one person considers is reasonable can be very different. It's highly subjective.

Just balance the percentage totals together so that you reach your target Overall Acceptance rate, while keeping the costs within your target budget allocation.

Yeah I agree. It has to do with your competitiveness relative to the OOS applicant pool for the particular medical school as well as your tolerance for risk.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 

startingover84

Full Member
Apr 26, 2012
116
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
I would think that it depends on how strong your application is and how much you want to attend the schools you are applying to.

I don't think there is any magic threshold.
 

DrMidlife

has an opinion
10+ Year Member
Oct 31, 2006
7,506
2,697
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
OOS percentages are only part of the story.

In West Virginia, for example, there's a high OOS percentage (like 30%), but that 30% is drawn solely from the surrounding Appalachian states.

U of Washington serves as the med school for 5 states (27% of the US landmass, 3% of the US population), so the OOS percentage combines a very high percentage for the region and a very low percentage for outside the region. The state govt's of AK, ID, MT & WY each "buy" a number of seats at UWash. Generally, states without med schools have regional buddies, and that contorts the OOS numbers.

You also have to look at how many apps a school gets. U of Vermont is famous, for example, for having more total seats than total instate applicants (2009: 115 seats, 85 VT apps, 27 VT matrics). Wide open field for OOS at that school. But this is well known, so there's a completely disproportionate number of OOS apps - like 6000 - so Vermont has no motivation to look at less-than-compelling apps from OOS students.

Similarly, OOS percentages are not high fidelity. It's not clear that a student who is a Texas resident, but went to college in Massachusetts, and has a current mailing address in MA, is counted as TX, when the school reports its numbers to AAMC. The person who gathers up the numbers may be more interested in making the school look worldly than in reporting numbers that help you make decisions.

You can assume that public schools are interested in seeding their student body with high-stats OOS diversity. You can assume that public schools are not motivated to collect another state's average or below-average applicants. You can assume that the economy has forced public schools to be more interested in OOS applicants from whom much higher tuition can be collected - any revenue source in a storm - but that such practices piss off the state's taxpayers ("you took 4 kids from California, instead of my hard-working 3.4/28 Suzie, after all the years I paid property taxes?!?!").

In general, if you have average-or-better stats (3.6+/31+), or you have a wicked compelling story and reasonable stats, it's worth your time to look at applying to public schools out of your state. With an average-or-worse application, other states are less interested in you than your own state.

Best of luck to you.
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 9 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.