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Applying to Medical School a second time

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by Parul Patel, Feb 9, 2002.

  1. Parul Patel

    Parul Patel Junior Member

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    Hello Med students,

    I am writing because I need advice, and I guess support from students that have already been through the whole medical school application process. I am applying for August 2002. I applied to 15 schools and so far have 4 rejections, and am on hold at 1 school. It seems as though I am going to be applying again next year. My GPA now is 3.5, and I have all the clinicals, leaderships and ECs in the world. The one thing however that I'm pretty sure is holding me back is my MCAT score, 26, 10B 9P 7V Q writing. That was my score the second time. The first time I took it, I was extremly sick and did not release my scores, it was a 19. I have already applied to and been accepted into a 1 year Masters program in chemistry, so I know what I'll be doing next year if med school doesnt work out. I would just like some advice on what I else I should do to increase my chances of getting in next year aside from applying really early, and retaking the dreaded MCAT.

    Parul
     
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  3. vixen

    vixen I like members
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    your name sounds sooo familiar...I wonder if I know you :confused:
     
  4. dr.evil

    dr.evil Senior Member
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    I think your assessment of your MCAT scores may be correct but not necessarily. All but that 7 verbal score are tolerable for most state schools. If you don't get in, I highly recommend retaking the MCAT. I don't know how your 3.5 GPA breaks down (science vs non) but should be OK. Are you receiving interviews? At least 1 I guess. If you get the interview, you can get in. You just have to be a star when you're interviewing. Was your application late? It seems you have not heard from 10 of the schools.
     
  5. ckent

    ckent Membership Revoked
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    You might consider applying to DO schools next year if you don't get in anywhere this year.
     
  6. guardian

    guardian Senior Member
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    Send letters to the adcoms of schools you're waiting for. If you show that you're really motivated they may consider you for an interview and good things may happen.
     
  7. Ibis

    Ibis Senior Member
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    Another suggestion:

    You "might" want to consider a post-bacc over a Masters. If your ultimate goal is to matriculate into an MD/DO program, the post-bacc option allows more flexibility. And from what I've read, institutions don't really care which one you choose.

    A solid performance (3.8-4.0) in all upper-level science courses would, in my opinion, be very convincing. Good luck to you!
     
  8. If you are already planning to apply early and retake the MCAT then you are set to go. I applied to med school the first time with a 26 August MCAT and received all rejections; then retook while doing some grad work in Pathology, got a 29, and received 7 interviews (applied to 21 schools)and 2 acceptances (albeit late acceptances, but hey, I'm a med student now at a top 50 school!). All the advice given on this thread is good advice; I would also add just to be yourself at the interviews and show a strong (but not phony or overbearing) interest in the schools you would like to attend. best of luck.
     
  9. shorrin

    shorrin the ninth doctor
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Ibis:
    <strong>Another suggestion:

    You "might" want to consider a post-bacc over a Masters. If your ultimate goal is to matriculate into an MD/DO program, the post-bacc option allows more flexibility. And from what I've read, institutions don't really care which one you choose.

    A solid performance (3.8-4.0) in all upper-level science courses would, in my opinion, be very convincing. Good luck to you!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Hey ibis,

    I thought you couldn't do a post-bacc if you already had an sci. BA. Tell me if I'm wrong and if you have suggestions! thx!
     
  10. Ibis

    Ibis Senior Member
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    Hi Shorrin,

    You have a good point. Personally, I graduated with a nonscience degree, so it made sense for me to do it. What makes the post-bacc especially attractive is that your grades are separated from courses you took in undergrad on the AMCAS appl. (hence, a separate GPA) It's arranged very similar to that of one's graduate courses.

    So even with a degree in science, I think one could easily contruct a rigorous science course-load for a semester or two in a post-bacc type arrangement. It's my belief that schools mainly just want to know you can handle the work. Why should they be concerned whether or not it's a masters program, or PHD, for that matter? Just my opinion, of course. :)
     
  11. shorrin

    shorrin the ninth doctor
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    That makes sense to me!

    For myself I am trying to think of a one year program that would help my application and enable me to re-apply for next year, '03. I already have a sci-degree. It would have to be something that I could do that makes sense for my future if I don't ever get into md school. The only reason I am thinking of it is because my gpa (3.31) is the thing that is holding me back (my oppinion).

    thanks for the thoughts!
     
  12. shorrin

    shorrin the ninth doctor
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    ooops. opinion. you know how a word starts to look wrong anyway you type it after looking at it too long :D .
     
  13. sandflea

    sandflea Senior Member
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by shorrin:
    <strong>That makes sense to me!

    For myself I am trying to think of a one year program that would help my application and enable me to re-apply for next year, '03. I already have a sci-degree. It would have to be something that I could do that makes sense for my future if I don't ever get into md school. The only reason I am thinking of it is because my gpa (3.31) is the thing that is holding me back (my oppinion).

    thanks for the thoughts!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">if this year doesn't pan out for you and you decide to pursue the one-year program, you would be better off by finishing the program BEFORE you reapply. this is because you would improve your GPA as much as you possibly could through the program BEFORE you ever send in another med school application. if you apply at the same time that you enter the program, you won't have any new grades to improve your GPA until december or so, and by then many interview spots and acceptances have already been handed out. it would also give you an opportunity to do other things to improve your applications during the year--more volunteer work, research, whatever--so that when you reapply, you've added that much more to your app. otherwise you would essentially be reapplying with the exact same application and credentials until around december or so, nearly halfway through the application cycle.

    there are pros and cons to doing a post-bacc versus a masters--one is not universally better than the other. it depends on what you ultimately want to get out of it. if you're concerned about having something as a back-up in case med school doesn't work out, then you'd be better off with getting a masters because you don't walk away from a post-bacc program with anything 'tangible'. anyway, this topic has been covered a lot around here so do a search for it and you may find a lot of advice. good luck!
     

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