Are NYCOM yrs 1 and 2 REALLY that brutal??

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by njdesi, Nov 7, 2002.

  1. njdesi

    njdesi Senior Member

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    I have been hearing for years, anecdotally, that NYCOM's first 2
    years are really bad in terms of the demands it places on students and that they weed out atleast 15-20 students a year
    (as in failures and drop outs). Is this true?? I would like some
    feedback from any SDN NYCOMers. Thanks.
     
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  3. Fenrezz

    Fenrezz AT Stills Worst Nightmare

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    I would be surprised if that were true. The weed out process is done before you get into medical school. Once you are there, the school puts a lot of time and effort to make you a doctor, so there's no point in weeding out because by accepting you, they've decided you can make it.

    Besides, they would lose a whole lot of tuition money if you drop out after one year. That's 3 years of tuition they won't receive for every peron that drops out. And it's not like they can make it up by replacing the seat with someone else in the middle of the year.

    Best advice I ever heard about applying to medical school: Believe none of what you hear, and only half of what you see.
     
  4. oceandocDO

    oceandocDO Senior Member

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    Not at all, IMHO. The NYCOM of today is very different than 5-10 years ago. The curriculum changed to the block format 3 years ago, so the kinks are mostly worked out and people do pretty well. Most people have pretty normal, healthy lives outside med school. I know I do. The few weeks leading up to exams are stressful, but this is medical school. It aint supposed to be easy. They dont spoon feed you here. You're expected to show up for class and learn the material, but stress wise, I cant imagine it's any more than most med schools. I dont think the drop-out/fail rate is higher than any other school. The new administration is really great and responsive. Dr. Ross-Lee, the new dean, is very proactive and student-oriented. They do what they can to make life easier. They print up all the notes and lectures for you, so in class you follow along and dont have to worry about writing everything down or pay for a scribe service. Also, all lectures can be viewed in streaming format from home online. Watching cardio lecture from my bed isnt bad. Also, all students are given brand new Sony Clies, a $300 PDA, to keep. Competition within the class is rare, as grading is H/P/F. Students are pretty supportive of each other. The school has also drastically upgraded the facilities of late including a new cafeteria (actually really great food). They have a wellness program after class most days with kickboxing, yoga, aerobics, etc to stay in shape with. They even paid for hotel rooms for anyone who wanted to go to Vegas for 5 days for the AOA Convention. I think 150 people went. Great friggin time. My liver still is recovering.

    Anyway, moral of the story, med students like to complain. It's a stress reliever. Dont believe everything you hear. NYCOM has 3,000 graduates out there who are good doctors. 10 people apply for every seat in the class. If you're here, you deserve it. It's up to you to take it from there. PM me if you want more info.
     
  5. bthings

    bthings Member

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    I would agree with Ocean Doc DO.

    We probably do lose 15-25 students from beginning first year to beginning second year (Maybe another 5-10 deccelerate). However, in a class size of 300+ that equates to <3% which is on par with any medical school.

    As far as the rigors of first and second year...It's not that bad. I would only say that it behooves you to keep up with the material. Falling behind in the reading can lead to failing an exam...then there's studying for the retake while the rest of the class presses on into new material which as you might imagine can lead to a domino effect of perpetually trying to catch up!

    Other than that, having a strong bioscience background will definitely help you through 1st year. It did for me. Likewise having a strong first year will set you up for the concepts taught in second year.(where it is even more important to keep up with the material!!)

    Overall years 1 and 2 are difficult but, never as bad as they say.

    -B
    NYCOM Class of 2005
     
  6. BrooklynDO

    BrooklynDO Senior Member

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    Its not supposed to be easy. The only hard part comes when we have to take exams. For the most part, once you figure out how to adjust your life to fit in the amount of studying you have to do, you will be ok. Its all about knowing how to handle stress and knowing when to lay off. Yes, first year is no joke so far, but when you go home on the weekend off after a block and realize how much you actually know, it makes things worth while. Besides, I heard that attendings like NYCOM kids due to the "rough" education we are given.
    things are getting better though
    ~nycom 2006
     
  7. oceandocDO

    oceandocDO Senior Member

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    Brooklyn,

    A word of advice, attendings dont like NYCOM students and grads because of the "rough" education we're given, they like the school because we know our stuff, work hard, and most importantly, work well with people. If you ask any attending, resident, or med student at any school, anywhere, what they went through will automatically be harder than what you went through... they had to walk to school in the snow, uphill both ways, etc etc. It's all a matter of perpspective. Let's be a bit more positive, you have no idea how lucky you are to be at NYCOM or how great of a school this place is becoming and already is.

    -nycom 2005
     
  8. BrooklynDO

    BrooklynDO Senior Member

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    Ocean, perhaps a bad choice of words on my part, but out education, 'rough' or otherwise, has a great role to play in the product...eg: us. As for being lucky or having an idea about the school I am at, lets just say Ive been around NYCOM for a while, so I sort of have a good idea of whats going on. For instance, Dean Lee was the dean at my undergrad before she was dean here. etc.
    :)
     
  9. soluentgreen

    soluentgreen Junior Member

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    I am a part of the pre Dean Ross- Lee generation of NYCOMers .... I think that a lot of the bad rap the first 2 years of that school is headed to the garbage bins. The new package of administrators has managed to really turn the school spirit around in a very short time.
    The morale when I attended there only 2 years ago was so low..... I remember my interview day. We were touring the campus and in the gutters of NYCOM II a stressed out third year taking her boards yelled out: "Dont go here!"
    Looking back at my first two year- yes, they were hell. However, since I have left the preclinical years approximately four deans have retired and have been replaced by a motivated, responsive administration whose sole goal is to make our lives easier. Every time I go back to the campus I have to wonder whether the new deans have put spiked the water: the first years love it, and the second years are enamoured even after spending a whole year there.
    My only regret about NYCOM s that I couldnt learn under the new administration. You will have a good time here.
    ~nycom 2003:D
     

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