Are there any advantages of doing your university degree at a university with a medical school?

Brock sciences

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In terms of research, I mean I've been thinking about this and lets say one does research at his UG institution with the same professor for 4 years. Then he embarks on an MD PhD doing his PhD with the same prof. I wonder will such a strategy make completing ones PhD faster?

Also, does it matter what your major is for MD PhD programs?

and

are MD/PhD's smarter then regular MD's?

Discuss.
 
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Brock sciences

Brock sciences

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In terms of research, I mean I've been thinking about this and lets say one does research at his UG institution with the same professor for 4 years. Then he embarks on an MD PhD doing his PhD with the same prof. I wonder will such a strategy make completing ones PhD faster?
Also, does it matter what your major is for MD PhD programs?

and

are MD/PhD's smarter then regular MD's?

Discuss.
 
Dec 3, 2011
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In terms of research, I mean I've been thinking about this and lets say one does research at his UG institution with the same professor for 4 years. Then he embarks on an MD PhD doing his PhD with the same prof. I wonder will such a strategy make completing ones PhD faster?
Also, does it matter what your major is for MD PhD programs?

and

are MD/PhD's smarter then regular MD's?

Discuss.
I hardly think you can generalize and say MD/PhDs are smarter than regular MDs. There are incredibly intelligent people in both categories.

Your scenario is probably possible. No idea if your PhD would be done faster or not. Maybe you might save a year since you won't have to train.That being said, is it beneficial to the student to do only one kind of research for 8 years?

I don't think your major matters that much. For the PhD portion most programs prefer to fund biomedical science research of some sort.
 

karayaa

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In terms of research, I mean I've been thinking about this and lets say one does research at his UG institution with the same professor for 4 years. Then he embarks on an MD PhD doing his PhD with the same prof. I wonder will such a strategy make completing ones PhD faster?
no
Also, does it matter what your major is for MD PhD programs?
no

and

are MD/PhD's smarter then regular MD's?
unanswerable - unless you specific a certain kind of smartness/intelligence

Discuss.
But to answer you title question: Are there any advantages of doing your university degree at a university with a medical school? - yes, there are: Shadowing, research, clinical volunteering opportunities.
 
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mmmcdowe

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Theoretically yes you would be able to finish your PhD faster, but it is highly unlikely that you would end up doing the same research in medical as a continuation of your previous work. There's no harm in trying, but don't be surprised if you end up changing labs even if you do stay at the same school.
 
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In terms of research, I mean I've been thinking about this and lets say one does research at his UG institution with the same professor for 4 years. Then he embarks on an MD PhD doing his PhD with the same prof. I wonder will such a strategy make completing ones PhD faster?
Yes, definitely. The major hold up of getting a PhD is getting your project completed. While many people spend the first two years rotating through labs to figure out what they want to do, at most institutions it is unnecessary to ever leave a single lab (though it's generally discouraged so that students are exposed to more science). If you start off in the lab of your choice during your first year, then you can start working on your project right away. Your work may even be an offshoot from the work you do in UG, plus your PI will already trust you and have trained you on the necessary techniques. There are about 2 years worth of courses. By starting work on their project from the first year and knowing exactly what they are interested in, PhD candidates can finish the degree in as little as 3 years.
 

URHere

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In terms of research, I mean I've been thinking about this and lets say one does research at his UG institution with the same professor for 4 years. Then he embarks on an MD PhD doing his PhD with the same prof. I wonder will such a strategy make completing ones PhD faster?
This could go either way. I've known MD/PhD students who have stayed with a previous mentor and earned 3 year PhDs . I also know a few who ended up taking 5 years or more (in one case, mostly because the student had become so valuable to the lab that the PI was very unhappy to see him graduate). It depends on the student and it depends on the mentor.

For what it's worth, when I was considering pursing my MD/PhD at my undergraduate institution, several faculty members cautioned me that it may not look good to have all of my advanced training from a single institution. I don't know how many people actually care about something like that, but people brought it up with me often enough that it may be worth thinking about.

As for your other questions? No and no.
 

BioBeaver

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Also, does it matter what your major is for MD PhD programs?

are MD/PhD's smarter then regular MD's?

Discuss.
Your major should probably be related to what you want to get your PhD in.....

No they're not "smarter", they just enjoy research more.....

Something about your posts really tick me off..... :penguin: "DISCUSS"
 

BlueLabel

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In terms of research, I mean I've been thinking about this and lets say one does research at his UG institution with the same professor for 4 years. Then he embarks on an MD PhD doing his PhD with the same prof. I wonder will such a strategy make completing ones PhD faster?
Also, does it matter what your major is for MD PhD programs?

and

are MD/PhD's smarter then regular MD's?

Discuss.
Correct, MD/PhD's are smarter, are typically better public speakers, are far better at cooking, and they are known for having much "bigger feet" if you catch my drift ;)
 
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mcloaf

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And you even cross-posted this from hSDN?