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Are there any DO schools that don't push Primary Care?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by Nanook, May 21, 2000.

  1. Nanook

    Nanook Senior Member
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    Just out of curiosity--do all the DO schools push Primary Care?

    If so, are there some that push it less than others?

    Lastly, does attending a school that pushes PC make it harder to acquire a specialty residency?
     
  2. doatc

    doatc Senior Member
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    I am a MSIII at CCOM and I have never been "pushed" towards primary care. I feel that a majority of my class mates may want to enter a primary care field but it is not due to any sense of obligation. I think that it is a general feeling among DO students that they should pursue a Primary Care field. At CCOM, we have a very diversified student body and the majority of us will enter Primary Care, but all of the sepcialities will be represented.
     
  3. UHS2002

    UHS2002 Senior Member
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    Ditto for UHS
     
  4. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member
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    doatc & UHS2002,

    I really think you should take a look at your respective school's mission statement. It clearly states primary care is the emphasis in both programs.
     
  5. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor
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    All DO schools push primary care in one way or another. Some may be more subtle about it.

    Take a look at the required MS3 rotations/clerkships. If an overwhelming majority of them are in primary care, then it's a primary care-heavy school. Same goes for MD schools.

    Some guy from Pikeville several months ago wrote about the required MS3 AND MS4 rotations, and a HUGE number of them were in Ambulatory Care and Primary Care disciplines.


    Tim of New York City.
     
  6. UHS2002

    UHS2002 Senior Member
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    DocGibby,

    I am well familiar with UHS' mission statement. I am also familiar with the mission statements of many other schools, which use words such as:

    "recruting a diverse population of students" when the average age of their past 5 incoming classes has been 22-25, and 95% of their students are white.

    I think you should grant me the courtesy of not disagreeing with me on this subject since I have spent the last two years at UHS and, as far as I recall, you are not attending UHS. So, it would appear to me, that I should be slightly more qualified to speak as to my own school's orientation, their mission statement notwithstanding.

    Although UHS does give preference to people interested in primary care during the selection process, at no point afterwards, it tries to PUSH primary care or any other medical field on their students. There are several people in my class who are aiming at specialty residencies and they don't feel they need to keep it a secret (several want EM or surgery. We also have a few for each, derm, path, radiology, cardiology, just to name the ones I know first hand).

    As doatc pointed out in his post, the reason UHS, CCOM and most other osteopathic schools have a preponderance of graduates going into primary care is that DO schools do attract people who are initially interested in primary care, so this election is already done during admissions.
     
  7. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member
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    UHS2002,

    Take it easy I'm not trying to insult you. That a school might "push" primary care is not to say that it is ramed down your throat for 4 years. Instead it means that since PC is the emphasis of that school, the program in turn revolves around it. For instance, (please correct me if I'm wrong)your core rotations are all in PC medicine. You then have a choice of selecting electives in the specialties of your choice. Even the Osteopathic internship is primary care based. Incidently, I was accepted to UHS, but declined the invite.
     
  8. UHS2002

    UHS2002 Senior Member
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    DocGibby,

    I owe you an apology as well, as I really didn't want to come across as sharply as I did.

    I am not sure I agree with your statement that all our core rotations are in PC medicine. As I type this,I have in front of me the official required rotations for my class and the breakdown is:

    8 blocks of PC rotations (family med, IM, peds)- however 2 of these blocks can be used for a sub internship
    1 block of psych (I chose to put this into a separate category as some consider it primary care and others don't)
    7 blocks of non primary care rotations (surgery, EM, critical care, cardiology, etc)

    In addition you must have 4 blocks of 4th year electives in whatever you want.

    I think there is a balance between primary care rotations and non primary care (8 PC+1 if you count psych. vs 7 non PC + 4 in whatever you want). Obviously there is the oportunity of getting plenty of PC over everything else, if one wishes to do so. However, this schedule gives someone who is not interested in primary care, the chance to have less PC rotations.

    A friend of mine graduated from a MD school a few years ago and her core rotations in PC were:
    1 block of Family med
    3 blocks of IM
    1 block of Peds
    1 block of Psych

    Basically, she got 3 months less of core PC than we will. And at that, one can argue that someone who aspires to be an endocrinologist, for instance, will have to take lots of IM rotations, which falls under the category of PC. And yet, this doesn't mean at all that the person or the school is oriented towards primary care.

    To me, a school that would be heavily geared towards PC, would be Pikesville for instance. They have some very long rural rotation requirements.
     
  9. Nanook

    Nanook Senior Member
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    Thanks for the replies! I have catalogs for the schools I'm applying to, so I will definitely check out the required rotations they have.

    I've also looked at the mission statements for the schools--most, but not all, have primary care written in. And I'm sure that some "push" it harder than others. Many of us have seen the Nova students complaining of being pushed a little too hard, and maybe a few others. So it is interesting to hear from some of the other schools. Anybody else?
     
  10. Pikevillemedstudent

    Pikevillemedstudent Bengals Fan
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    Actually, I spoke with a Pikeville student a few months ago about the long rural rotation (3 months of Appalachian Primary Care)and he told me that the adminstration eliminated that requirement. He said it was replaced with radiology for 1 month, but was unsure about the other two month requirements. Other PC reqs. are 2 months FP, 2 months IM, 2 months Peds, and 1 month of Ob/Gyn. Just thought I would add that.
     

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