nysegop

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University of New Mexico school of medicine
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine
University of Nebraska College of Medicine
New York Medical College
University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine
East Carolina University The Brody School of Medicine
 

PMPMD

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University of New Mexico school of medicine
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine
University of Nebraska College of Medicine
New York Medical College
University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine
East Carolina University The Brody School of Medicine

FYI there are 2 Texas Tech med schools now - Lubbock and El Paso. El Paso is new - the first class are MS3's I believe.
 

mmmcdowe

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University of New Mexico school of medicine
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine
University of Nebraska College of Medicine
New York Medical College
University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine
East Carolina University The Brody School of Medicine

Yes, though they aren't prestigious if that's what you meant. Be aware that a lot of those schools have very high in state student preferences.
 
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nysegop

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Yes, though they aren't prestigious if that's what you meant. Be aware that a lot of those schools have very high in state student preferences.

It seems most med schools (including private schools) have in-state preferences. I know that even harvard gives preference to in-state applicants.
 

Law2Doc

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There are very few med schools compared to the number if colleges and to folks who show up to college "premed". Fewer than 150 US allopathic med schools total. About half of all applicant wont get in. So they are all "good", and pretty much all will serve as decent launching pads for most specialties. Do they have Harvard or Hopkins prestige? No. Do they crank out capable residents who go on to impressive private practice or academic careers in most specialties? Yes. Will you be working beside graduates of these in your later career, and hear them speak at national meetings, etc, pretty much regardless of where you go? Yes.
 

mmmcdowe

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Statistically it is in fact easier to get into Harvard as an instate student. Do some research.
http://www.startmedicine.com/app/schooldetails.asp?ID=155&DH=20

That's not the same as in-state preference. In state preference implies a policy of accepted students preferentially based on their status as being residents of the state. There are several reasons why kids from the area do slightly better, but it isn't because that they are MA residents.
 

nysegop

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That's not the same as in-state preference. In state preference implies a policy of accepted students preferentially based on their status as being residents of the state. There are several reasons why kids from the area do slightly better, but it isn't because that they are MA residents.

I wouldn't say that students coming from MA are necessarily better than students coming from anywhere else. I don't think it's just coincidence that U Penn also prefers Penn applicants. There is a clear bias towards in state applicants. In both public and private. Maybe has something to do with hospitals trying to be more community oriented.
 
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