Are these POD Laws accurate/up-to-date?

Discussion in 'Podiatric Residents & Physicians' started by DexterMorganSK, Jul 27, 2017.

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  1. DexterMorganSK

    DexterMorganSK The Blood Guy

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    Jul 16, 2016
    Hello,

    I was wondering if the info in the attached document, "Podiatry Laws State by State Comparison" is accurate and uptodate? According to the PDF, a DPM has a somewhat "hand" privileges in the following states: Alaska, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio & West Virginia.

    The PDF seems to be from www.aaos.org/articlelink/?id=27475

    Thank you
     

    Attached Files:

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  3. pacpod

    pacpod SDN Administrator 7+ Year Member

    You would need to check with each state board for the most up to date scope. Some states do allow for soft tissue on the hand but I'd never do it myself.
     
    DexterMorganSK likes this.
  4. Adam Smasher

    Adam Smasher persona non grata 7+ Year Member

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    This was something I took a great interest in early in residency. The APMA has a very useful scope-of-practice map on its website which you should have access to if your APMSA dues are paid. You can use it to access the most current version of each state's definition and scope of practice for podiatry.

    Alaska has taken the very sensible step of including in the podiatry scope the treatment of superficial skin lesions of the hand. This is a good law for podiatrists as well as patients, because patients with, say, onychomycosis of the fingers and the toes don't need to be referred to derm, which in Alaska who knows how far you need to go to find a dermatologist.

    Minnesota and Ohio take it a step further, giving podiatrists full scope in the hand. I have no idea how they got away with this, seeing how hand surgery is not a big part of any residency curriculum I am aware of. I would caution you to remember that your privileges are delinieated by the surgery center/hospital where you operate, and they might have stricter standards. Furthermore, performing a procedure which you are not proficient in would be defined in most states as "professional misconduct" which is grounds for suspension. But if you like the idea of doing a pollicization of the great toe, be my guest.
     
    DexterMorganSK likes this.
  5. DexterMorganSK

    DexterMorganSK The Blood Guy

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    Jul 16, 2016
    Thanks for your input. I plan to become a paid member once school begins. Looking forward to that map as I am also very interested in the scope practice for Pods throughout the US.
     
  6. bobtheweazel

    bobtheweazel 2+ Year Member

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    APMA membership is free for students.

    Sent from my Pixel using SDN mobile
     
  7. Adam Smasher

    Adam Smasher persona non grata 7+ Year Member

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    Check your tuition statement, because I distinctly remember one item being "APMSA dues" in the amount of something like $35
     
  8. bobtheweazel

    bobtheweazel 2+ Year Member

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    But APMSA and APMA are technically two different memberships. Every podiatry student is automatically enrolled in APMSA but not APMA. Students have the choice whether or not to join APMA, but it is free if they do.

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  9. bobtheweazel

    bobtheweazel 2+ Year Member

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    But I'll take your word for it on the APMSA dues. I have a bad habit of paying bills (e.g., tuition) without looking at the itemization, since there's generally nothing I can do to change it anyway.

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    Weirdy likes this.
  10. DexterMorganSK

    DexterMorganSK The Blood Guy

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    I did join the APMA and waiting for their reply. We are charged, as you and AdamS said, about the APMSA, every term. Below is a breakdown of the fees at Scholl:


    Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 4.33.27 PM.png
     
  11. Adam Smasher

    Adam Smasher persona non grata 7+ Year Member

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    This is way off topic, but it truly aggravates me to see the way RFUMS nickles and dimes the students. $138/year for student chapter professional society dues is absurd. Other than a couple of speakers each year and some catered lunches, I don't remember much tangible benefit from either organization. Maybe free student admission to the Midwest Podiatry Conference?

    And why separate fees for technology/lab/activities, etc? Charging extra for technology and lab is like charging extra at a restaurant for your table and chair. And activities don't cost anything since they're all student run and funded.

    And $220 for your skeleton model is criminal. I wouldn't be able to resell mine on ebay for what it would cost to ship it.

    Final rant: I distinctly remember the instructors telling us to NEVER refer to our instruments as "tools," because it denigrates the higher purpose for which they are intended, etc.
     
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  12. I post PRN

    I post PRN 2+ Year Member

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    Haha, same here, "they are instruments, not tools"
     
    greasemonkey likes this.
  13. greasemonkey

    greasemonkey 5+ Year Member

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    Pod resident in Ohio here. Can't speak for Minnesota, but in Ohio, podiatrists do NOT have full scope in the hand. We can treat conditions related to nails and soft tissue. So, I have trimmed and avulsed finger nails, as well as excised large verruca lesions. Just FYI.
     

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