What do you think of the opening of new schools?

  • I love new schools!! Keep opening those babies up!!

    Votes: 32 34.4%
  • Schools?? We don't need no stinking new schools!!

    Votes: 52 55.9%
  • What? They're opening new schools? I had no idea!!

    Votes: 9 9.7%

  • Total voters
    93

docslytherin

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i've been sitting here wondering about all the new expansion schools opening up lately and wondered what everyone thought about whether or not they're opening too quickly.

on one hand, increasing the population of DOs could be a good move to spread the word about osteopathy and increasing public awareness.

on the other hand, there might be a need to step back and let the AOA work on other issues facing DOs right now. primarily, the lack of DO residencies for the current number of DO grads.

anyway, i was just wondering what others thought... i sometimes fear that we'll saturate the marketplace (much like law schools did in the 80s, so that now there are WAY too many lawyers) though that's a LONG way off... and yes, i do go slightly "chicken little" sometimes.

john
 

medicine1

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I will be attending a new DO school, and I am very excited about the possibilites and opportunities I will have in the near future.
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timtye78

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Don't get fooled by the 'not enough DO residencies' stuff. Hardly anybody I ever knew dreamed of going to osteopathic residencies. Before I was even starting med school at TCOM, I was told not to go into DO residencies! My friends that did, got screwed when the only DO hospital in Texas closed down. Other friends supposedly matched in DO dermatology somewhere in NY, and rumor was that hospital/program closed prior to him even starting.

Look at scutwork.com to see how many unfilled MD slots are available-there are no shortages as far as general practice residency positions are concerned.

These are two ways to increase public awareness of DOs:
Number 1: Numbers-the more the public sees DO behind someone's name, the less questions we will get
Number 2: Research in Non Osteopathic Medicine (eg mainstream medicine)
One complaint I hear in the allo world-which is the world-is hardly any significant medical discoveries or mainstream scientific medical research has been done by DOs.
 

NotShorty

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If allopathic schools begin teaching osteopathic manipulation, what effect will this have on our profession?

I asked this to the president of the AOA when he was here. He responded something like, "well, we'll just have to make sure we teach it better." or something to that effect.

;) Not off topic: If such a thing happens, will it validate Osteopathy, making residencies more accessable (whether DO or MD), or will it forever label DOs as doctors, but with crappier MCAT scores than MDs?

If it's the latter, I don't think the # of schools matters because the degree would essentially become worthless.

Thoughts?

NS
 

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There are 2 ways to look at this...

1.) We are spreading our "osteopathic experts" to thin by opening up additional osteopathic medical schools, that is at least until the number of practicing osteopathic physicians increases.

2.)One of our osteopathic ideals (and it should be for all physicians) is that we reach out to underserved communities. The new schools that are opening are in or near locations where this is just the case. These new schools will hopefully retain physcians in those areas to meet the healthcare needs of the surrounding population.

(This is atleast my view on the situation)

This is a great thread and I just want to hear what others of you have to say!

Panther
 

medicine1

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-Increase our numbers
-have more research through private and public Universities, Research companies, Hospitals, etc.
:clap: :clap:

We have more resources than meets the eye. There are DOs, DO/Ph.D., MS, Ph.D.,PharmD., Ed.D., MDs, MD/Ph.D., PA-C, RN/LPN, and MPH/PA/DO/MD people that can work together to build a strong DO force.
 

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Correct me if I am wrong, but won't all these new schools making new ties create new residencies? Anyway I am a bit biased having been accepted to one of these new schools. But here in GA I know we def. needed a DO school. 2 in FL and the next closest ones in VA and Texas

BMW-



medicine1 said:
-Increase our numbers
-have more research through private and public Universities, Research companies, Hospitals, etc.
:clap: :clap:

We have more resources than meets the eye. There are DOs, DO/Ph.D., MS, Ph.D.,PharmD., Ed.D., MDs, MD/Ph.D., PA-C, RN/LPN, and MPH/PA/DO/MD people that can work together to build a strong DO force.
 

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NotShorty said:
If allopathic schools begin teaching osteopathic manipulation, what effect will this have on our profession?

I asked this to the president of the AOA when he was here. He responded something like, "well, we'll just have to make sure we teach it better." or something to that effect.
I think you are missing something in that the DO is not just the sum of his/her OMM skills. The holistic approach to patient care, emphasis on health not disease and focus on primary care are reasons why MDs will never take the place of DOs. BTW I have heard that many MDs are learning OMM post grad, this does not make them a DO... only an MD who knows OMM.

Stand firm to your osteopathic principles and wannabe DOs will never take our place.

BACK TO SUBJECT:

I am also going to be part of a new school. While a flood of doctors in the market may lead to problems in health care (not like the problems of a flood of lawyers), the new schools (at least mine) are opening in underserved communities. There is a void of doctors to which we can find an open niche.
 
OP
docslytherin

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BMW19 said:
Correct me if I am wrong, but won't all these new schools making new ties create new residencies? Anyway I am a bit biased having been accepted to one of these new schools. But here in GA I know we def. needed a DO school. 2 in FL and the next closest ones in VA and Texas

BMW-
i'm from alabama and i agree that there does need to be more exposure in the south. the schools in florida don't really count (no offense, but people in tennesee, mississippi, alabama and georgia don't really consider florida as part of the south!!).

what i would personally like to see are better affiliations for the schools that already exist in terms of guaranteeing clinical rotations at academic hospitals (ties between the new pcom-ga and emory would be great) because i think that's how we have to get ourselves out there.

my biggest gripe is that the research DOs are doing (as a generalization) is not into a greater understanding of some mechanism of the human body as it relates to all of medicine. DO research, as a whole, is primarily centered around OMM. get some DOs studying and publishing in prominent journals on a regular basis and i think all questions of equality disappear. but if all anyone ever sees are explanations about how cranial osteopathy can limit inner ear infections, it's hard for anyone to see us as anything other than OMM docs. the professional perception of us needs to change, in my humble opinion, to doctors first.

so to get back to the topic at hand, i would love to see schools actively exploring affiliations with large academic hospitals instead of opening 4 or 5 new schools every 2 years.
 

TCOM-2006

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docslytherin said:
i've been sitting here wondering about all the new expansion schools opening up lately and wondered what everyone thought about whether or not they're opening too quickly.

on one hand, increasing the population of DOs could be a good move to spread the word about osteopathy and increasing public awareness.

on the other hand, there might be a need to step back and let the AOA work on other issues facing DOs right now. primarily, the lack of DO residencies for the current number of DO grads.

anyway, i was just wondering what others thought... i sometimes fear that we'll saturate the marketplace (much like law schools did in the 80s, so that now there are WAY too many lawyers) though that's a LONG way off... and yes, i do go slightly "chicken little" sometimes.

john
very interesting topic.

there is not likely be a problem of "saturating the market" according to the latest analysis. i just happened to be writing a paper on this physician supply and distribution topic, so see below for details (pasted from my paper) and references.

the osteopathic profession has traditionally (and continues to) churn out lots of primary care physicians who are more likely to serve in areas of need. this is a good thing for the public (contributed positively to the complex equation of access to healthcare). i have pasted some comments from my draft paper.

so - i think that the argument could be made that:

--there's no risk of a physician surplus anytime soon

--DOs, in general, positively contribute to access to care and public good, especially in rural areas which tend to be underserved.

--more DO schools will produce more graduates, which will allow us to help combat the coming shortage that may lead to decreased access to care

--graduates of these DO schools still have to pass the COMLEX or USMLE steps for licensure (the purpose of which is to protect the public by setting standards of competency).

--if a medical school can produce graduates which pass the boards and comparable rates to other schools, but it has a tiny budget and more limited faculty... then perhaps it's just a more cost-effective way to 'produce' the needed increase in physician workforce.

--even though the growth of AOA GME is inadequate to meet the needs of DO graduates - there's still plenty of room to train in ACGME programs. there would likely be an increase in the # of DOs (who currently compose ~ 6% of residents in ACGME programs)and a proportional decrease in IMGs (who currently compose ~ 27% of residents in ACGME programs).

--while the relative decrease in the # of IMGs in ACGME programs would not be apprecaited by those IMGs seeking training in the US, perhaps this is, overall, more "fair". in other words - is it fair from a global perspective for the most economically powerfull nation in the world to utalize physicians from other nations to fill it's physician shortage? many of these physicians are the best and brightest of their nation (this is sometimes called the "brain drain").

**now - having said all of this - do i support opening up more DO schools? i'm not sure. there are other factors to consider here (look for a post later). now for those references:

********************************

The Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee (GMENAC), which was established in 1976, concluded that the U.S. would face a surplus of physician in 1981, and reaffirmed this position in several reports published between 1992 and 1998.3 Romano cites COGME’s estimate of a 150,000 physician surplus by 2020.4 Although the physician surplus prediction of GMENAC [which is now known as the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME)] did become significant basis for public policy, some in the literature rejected these findings. In an analysis by Cooper et al, it is predicted that while the physician to population ratio will increase to 280 per 100,000 by 2020, there will be a 20% (or 200,000 physician) shortage by this time because of forces that will increase demand for healthcare. While there were those that criticized Cooper’s findings8,5, Romano cites a study by Salsberg which predicts a 150,000 physician shortage by 20204, and COGME eventually issued a report which acknowledges that there is indeed an impending physician shortage, pegging the number at 85,000 by the same year.10 The projected physician shortage will significantly test the medical education system and do doubt influence interdependent workforce issues, such as the distribution and composition of physicians and non-physician clinicians.

**********************************************

There is much evidence to suggest that, in general, geographic physician distribution is skewed toward metropolitan areas, leaving those in rural areas with a relative decrease in their access to healthcare. While 20% of the U.S. population resides in rural areas, less than 11% of physicians reside in rural areas.
The Osteopathic profession has had a long history of in rural areas and in primary care specialties. While the profession comprises only 5.1 percent of the nation’s physicians, DOs make up 15.3 percent of all physicians in small rural counties.17 The West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine has had particular success in producing primary care physicians that serve in rural areas. In 1999, 54 percent specialized in family practice, and leads the nation in providing physicians for rural practice in the Appalachian region. 17% percent of graduates from 1989 through 1994 practice in rural areas of West Virginia, compared to an average of only 7% for the two allopathic medical schools in the state.18

There are limits, however, to the above studies, most importantly the fact that not all rural areas are underserved, and not all non-rural areas are not underserved.

********************************************

references:

1. Anderson R.M., Rice T.H., Kominski G.F. Changing the U.S. Health Care System. 2nd Ed. 2001. Jossey-Bass.

2. Grumbach K. “Fighting Hand To Hand Over Physician Workforce Policy” Health Affairs (2002) 21:5;13-27.

3. Salsberg E.S., Forte G.J. “Trends In The Physician Workforce 1980-2000” Health Affairs (2002) 21:5;165-173.

4. Romano, M. “The Vanishing Doctor Surplus: Fears of looming shortage gain currency in field” Modern Healthcare (2003) 33:24;28.

5. Weiner J.P. “A Shortage of Physicians or a Surpluss of Assumptions?” Health Affairs (2002) 21:1;160-162.

6. Hilsenrath P., Lykens K., Mains D. “Physician Supply: An Economic and Policy Perspective” Texas Journal of Rural Health (2003) 21:1;16-29.

7. Cooper R.A., et al. “Economic and Demographic Trends Signal am Impending Physician Shortage” Health Affairs (2002) 21:1;140-154

8. Mullan F. “Some Thoughts on the White-Follows-Green Law” Health Affairs (2002) 21:1;159-159.

9. Reinhardt U.E. “Analyzing Cause and Effect in the U.S. Physician Workforce” Health Affairs (2002) 21:1;165-166.

10. Oransky I. “Report finds shortage of US physicians by 2020” Lancet (2003) 362:9392;1291.

11. Cooper R.A. “Medical Schools and their Applicants: An Analysis” Health Affairs (2003) 22:4;71-83.

12. Blumenthal D. “Toil and Trouble Gworing physician supply” Health Affairs (2003) 22:4;85-87.

13. Wood, D.L. “The Physician Workforce: A Medical School Dilemma” Health Affairs (2003) 22:4;97-99.

14. Brooks R.G., et al. “The Roles of Nature and Nurture in the Recruitment and Reflection of Primary Care Physicians in Rural Areas: A review of the Litreature” Academic Medicine (2002) 77;8:790-798.

15. Geyman, et al. “Educating Generalist Physicians for Rural Practice” The Journal of Rural Health (2000) 16:1;56-80.

16. Tooke-Rawlins D. “Rural Osteopathic Family Physician Supply: Past and Present” The Journal of Rural Health (2000) 16:3;299-300.

17. Simpson C., Simpson M.A. “Complexity of the healthcare crisis in rural America” J. American Osteo. Assn. (1994) 94:6;502-508.

18. Stookey J.R., Baker H.H., Nemit J.W., “How West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine achieves its mission of providing rural primary care physicians” America” J. American Osteo. Assn. (2000) 100:11;723-726.
 

LukeWhite

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TCOM-2006 said:
there is not likely be a problem of "saturating the market" according to the latest analysis. i just happened to be writing a paper on this physician supply and distribution topic, so see below for details (pasted from my paper) and references.
TCOM,

Great argument; I wish that more folks would look at this from the perspective of market forces. Have you included in your paper a discussion of the actual numerical effect the new schools will have on the influx of FMGs into mainly primary care positions? The hard-numbers ratio of American to foreign-trained and allopathic to osteopathic primary care docs is one that might turn up some interesting trends.

Will you be publishing this paper? I 'd love to read it.
 

medicine1

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I don't think our education is going to be compromised. I think our education will excel for the better. And as TCOM-2006 said, we all have to pass the COMLEX/USMLE just like our IMG and MD counterparts. We are helping the country by increasing our number. Residency programs will come and go, but we will continue to grow, and make a large and better contribution to the health needs in our society at large. Why are you so afraid of more DO schools opening? Do you realize how many Law schools there are in the United States and around the world? And Do you realize the number of DO schools in the United States? Not a very large number. Do you think allopathic schools are worried about their increases in enrollment/matriculation within the past ten years?
I don't think so.
 

subtle1epiphany

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I like to think that the new schools will open more post-grad programs and positions, but I wouldn't count on them creating as many as needed. I haven't heard of Osteopathic hospitals or complexes opening at these new locations, and that is where the residency program that we need will be created. (Please let me know if they're opening more hospitals, that would be a good thing!)
The dual-accredited programs are really what I think would be the best option, if just a fraction of the current programs were also AOA accredited, that would be incredible and a great feat.
However, there are certain areas of the US that are in need of medical schools and with the projected shortage of physicians, the osteopathic profession could poise itself to become an answer to this issue, rather than increasing our IMG population. Although the IMGs contain a significant portion of our own US citizen, they could go to DO schools as more open in key locations. Such locations that could be targeted: the "deep" south such as Arkansas or Alabama, Colorado or Utah, and the Pacific Northwest. Each of these locations could be served by a decent-sized DO school producing primary care physicians. While it may not be the finest solution to a couple issues, it could definitely help, especially if AOA-accredited hospitals could be opened and affiliated with said schools. This would simultaneously produce hospital-based post-grad opportunities in the same area. :thumbup:

Any thoughts on this idea? or am I just :sleep:
 

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I think Dr. Forman says it best:


"Opportunity, Challenge and Partnerships" are key words in understanding how Touro University - Nevada continues to develop and grow. The inaugural class of D.O. students has successfully completed their first semester and is in the midst of their second semester of the first year. A Masters Level Physician Assistant Study Program began in October and we are preparing to initiate Occupational Therapy and Nursing programs in the near future. The health care environment at Touro University - Nevada mirrors the health care system in our communities, i.e., partnerships and collaborative efforts in patient care. As the only medical school in Southern Nevada we are positioned to have a significant impact on the future healthcare of our community. The process to ensure that we are successful involves some very important partnerships that include the University of Nevada at Las Vegas (UNLV). Currently, we utilize some of UNLV faculty to assist in teaching several basic science courses; have research partnerships with UNLV and innovative projects (early decision plan and will soon have a 7-year combined undergraduate-medical degree program; there are plans for DO/PhD program, MS in Biomedical Science and other doctorate programs). We have an important partnership with the Southern Nevada Area Health Education Center (AHEC) to provide community service and education opportunities for our students. The Clark County Medical Society has identified more than 100 community based physicians who will provide a "shadow experience" preceptorship for our students that will begin during the second semester of the first year. Other partnerships are with the University Southern Nevada College of Pharmacy and UNLV's School of Dentistry.
http://www.tucom.edu/nv/tunv.html (look under Dean's Message)
---------------------------------------------------------------
It really isn't a matter of building new hospitals per se, but building alliances, finding new opportunities, and facing new and exciting challenges.
 

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BMW19 said:
Correct me if I am wrong, but won't all these new schools making new ties create new residencies?

BMW-
The real question is what hospital affiliations does your school enjoy? A medical school does not "make" new residencies. Hospitals can apply for accreditation with the various certification boards, and then request funding for slots via Medicare financing. It is the facility that drives and "owns" the program.

The more likely scenario is that this will be another DO school with a weak link to a small community hospital. The clinical faculty is not paid>>>>unmotivated.

According to Pres. Thomas, new DO schools only need $5 million to open. The LCME requires $150 million dollars for new MD programs.

Does more money=better education?

That's a great topic. I don't know the answer, but I can say that having a paid educator sertainly makes a difference in training.

New schools must be required to have a larger funding base prior to applying for accreditation. Contractual agreements with diversified medical centers should be a prerequisite to opening.

Clinical faculty should be paid. This is simply not possible under the current system.

That'll be .02.
 

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fuegorama said:
According to Pres. Thomas, new DO schools only need $5 million to open. The LCME requires $150 million dollars for new MD programs.
Wow, I had no idea that there was such a drastic difference. Maybe the AOA should mandate that more capital be secured for the formation of new institutions, I'd support that. :D :thumbup:
 

NotShorty

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DrB said:
I think you are missing something in that the DO is not just the sum of his/her OMM skills. The holistic approach to patient care, emphasis on health not disease and focus on primary care are reasons why MDs will never take the place of DOs.
To be honest, but hopefully not insulting, you sound exactly like the rest of us before we started med school.

I'd like to say that there is a significant difference between MDs and DOs other than the practice of OMM, but you don't see a whole heck of a lot else in the actual world of medicine. I'm sorry if you don't want to hear this, but to a certain degree it's true.

I REALLY LIKE learning manipulative therapies, and it upsets me to see other students who feel that the class is a waste of their time, but it happens. People are different and they have different likes and dislikes.

Similarly, to say that "we're awesome and they suck" because we've got this magical wholistic approach is insulting to a lot of good doctors. There are great DOs, crappy MDs, but also great MDs and crappy DOs.

Please don't believe any philosophical hype until you have experienced it for yourself. We are all created equal. MD and DO both equal doctor. Nothing more, nothing less.

That being said - yes, I am a first year, and my views are subject to change.

NS
 

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From what I have heard my school set aside 80 mill. Now of course they had PCOM philly to back it. In this situation, with the finances and rep. of PCOM philly I think the school will be great. I don't know enough about LECOM or Touro to comment on those. I find it hard to believe that a new DO school could start from scratch with 5 mill. It takes 5 mill to do a demolition and a rebuild! 5 Mill sounds like a lot but it is nothing in the scheme of things.

On another point, what are there 20 DO schools now? That hardly sounds like saturation, considering there are hundreds of allopathic schools. Even with all of these allo schools the reports still state that there will be a physician shortage in certain underserved areas in the next 10 years. We will be filling that void. Not the Emory grads that go into plastic surgery or whatever....

BMW



fuegorama said:
The real question is what hospital affiliations does your school enjoy? A medical school does not "make" new residencies. Hospitals can apply for accreditation with the various certification boards, and then request funding for slots via Medicare financing. It is the facility that drives and "owns" the program.

The more likely scenario is that this will be another DO school with a weak link to a small community hospital. The clinical faculty is not paid>>>>unmotivated.

According to Pres. Thomas, new DO schools only need $5 million to open. The LCME requires $150 million dollars for new MD programs.

Does more money=better education?

That's a great topic. I don't know the answer, but I can say that having a paid educator sertainly makes a difference in training.

New schools must be required to have a larger funding base prior to applying for accreditation. Contractual agreements with diversified medical centers should be a prerequisite to opening.

Clinical faculty should be paid. This is simply not possible under the current system.

That'll be .02.
 

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DrB said:
Stand firm to your osteopathic principles and wannabe DOs will never take our place.
:laugh:

Sorry... that sentence, presented on its own, is hilarious. Go back and read it in a year.
 

NotShorty

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BMW19 said:
Even with all of these allo schools the reports still state that there will be a physician shortage in certain underserved areas in the next 10 years. We will be filling that void.
Great news to those who go to an Osteopathic school to work in underserved areas...but it's never good for anyone to have a glass ceiling put over their head.

"DO's, filling the void at the bottom of the barrel - unable to get the residencies they rightfully deserve." :thumbdown: :eek:

That's OK with you? :confused: I don't believe that.

NS
 

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By the year 2020, there will be a physician shortage of approximately 200,000.

At the current time, there are some 26,000 residency slots, and 18,000 or so U.S. Grads. There are plenty of opportunities for obtaining a residency as a D.O., both now, and in the future.

From what I've heard, most D.O.'s don't even apply for osteopathic residencies. Again, as another poster mentioned, many often seem more likely to close than their ACGME-accredited counterparts. Though, at the current time, with the fact that you are dropped from the allopathic match if you land an osteopathic residency, many also shy away from applying to the latter.

The cost-structure of osteopathic hospitals needs to be reviewed, and the quality of the current residency programs as well, even before the expansion of new ones.

For now though, there are plenty of spots (AOA + ACGME), and I don't think it would hurt to open up a limited amount of new schools every several years or so. The quality of the admissions standards also needs to be held consistent at these new schools, in terms of entrance requirements, etc.

I love the fact that I am going to be attending a new school, and as medicine1 mentioned, the Dean is absolutely awesome. The school is definitely going to make a name for itself in the Nevada community, especially with all of the proposed programs and affiliations it has/will have.
 

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Yes, there will be more residencies available in the Las Vegas/Henderson area according to Dean Forman. Touro University - Nevada is affiliated with UMC and other area hospitals such as Valley, St. Rose, and I think Sunrise. According to the dean, these programs will more than likely be AOA-ACGME dually accredited programs. More info to come soon.
 

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What an exciting blind date you're on! I hope your dean is as dreamy in person as he was on the phone. (sarcasm button off)

box29 said:
According to the dean, these programs will more than likely be AOA-ACGME dually accredited programs. More info to come soon.
Making this goal become reality needs to #1 on your list. Do NOT just rely on the community DOS taking up the slack for your education. That's the school's responsibility.
As the AOA slides further from reality by denying the difference in quality b/t AOA and ACGME positions, we must secure lasting relationships with facilities that will be around for the long haul.
 

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some people have stated some similar ideas and i agree that on the whole osteopathic schools need to continue to establish and improve hospital affiliations.

it would be nice if more of the schools moved towards establishing their own core teaching hospitals. if that were the case, then yes we would see rises in the number of quality AOA residency positions. right now, many schools, the newer schools in particular are really often just nice new buildings for pre-clinical study...but their impact includes the affiliations that the new school makes which go a long way in spreading osteopathy in that particular community and it facilitates surrounding residency positions to be ACGME-AOA dually accredited. in the absence of more new funded AOA residencies, this is the next best thing for DO's to have more dually accredited spots. individual efforts by schools to set up good rotation sites and affiliations and individual efforts by students/residents as well as the hospitals to get sites dually accredited is going a long way.

its nice that most of the new schools that have popped up are coming in with good ties to other academic institutions as well. VCOM w/ V-tech. LECOM-FL, TUCOM-NV, and PCOM-GA are all satellites of more established schools.
 

LukeWhite

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PublicEnemy said:
its nice that most of the new schools that have popped up are coming in with good ties to other academic institutions as well. VCOM w/ V-tech. LECOM-FL, TUCOM-NV, and PCOM-GA are all satellites of more established schools.
This is more a product of convenience than academic responsibility. Opening a branch campus does an end-run around the accreditation process. While these new schools will be great for meeting the shortage of primary care docs, funding and accreditation requirements *do* have to be tightened up. Even at a relatively well-thought of school like AZCOM, the shallowness of the faculty pool is painfully evident in nearly every department. I shudder to think what it's going to be like at some of the newer campuses.
 

PublicEnemy

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LukeWhite said:
This is more a product of convenience than academic responsibility. Opening a branch campus does an end-run around the accreditation process. While these new schools will be great for meeting the shortage of primary care docs, funding and accreditation requirements *do* have to be tightened up. Even at a relatively well-thought of school like AZCOM, the shallowness of the faculty pool is painfully evident in nearly every department. I shudder to think what it's going to be like at some of the newer campuses.
yeah, you're absolutely right. i agree that funding and accreditation requirements should be quite stringent. it seems for some schools there are just enough faculty to cover each of the classes. but in the long run for the well being of each individual school and osteopathic schools in general, more than just teaching faculty exapansion, there needs to be progression of research as well. i like how umdnj-som is creating a new building almost exclusively for basic science research and continuing to bring in research faculty. add that to the academic center and the recently built university doctors pavillion and kennedy hospital, an actual on-site, on campus core teaching hospital, you're not talking about a 1-room-school-house type deal but an actual major medical center. thats a big reason why im choosing it. i know its the same way for many of the other schools and as some of these newer schools become more established, i hope they will move in the same direction.