Armed Forces scholarship ?'s

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by ERob, Nov 6, 2002.

  1. ERob

    ERob Member

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    Does anyone know much about the armed forces scholarships available for medical students? From what I understand they will pay your tuition etc. and a monthly stipend in return for 4 years of your service following medical school.

    What I don't understand is how residency fits into this program. How do you go about applying for such a scholarship? And, if you have had experience here, how have you felt about this choice?

    Thanks for you advice!
     
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  3. dph201

    dph201 Senior Member

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    Not to burst your bubble or anything. The armed forces will pay for the full ride of medical school, but the recruiter I spoke to said I would then owe them my residency and then approx. 7yrs after that. But the best person to ask would have to be dpw68. He was in the Air Force.
     
  4. dph201

    dph201 Senior Member

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    Hey you should also check out the thread titled military pay. Its talking about exactly what you were asking. There is also someone that is an active duty Airman.
     
  5. edmadison

    edmadison 1K Member

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    Attending Physician
    HPSP is what you are thinking of. It is offered by the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Each has minor variations on the program, but they are very similar. Most of my knowledge is of the army program. Here's the deal:

    You get full tuition, books and most fees as well as an approximately $1000/month stipend. You then owe the military one year of active duty as an attending or GMO (NOT as an intern or resident) for each year you receive the scholarship. Additionally, you must serve in the reserves after your active duty attending/GMO time so that the total of reserve + attending/GMO time is equal to seven years. However, this reserve time may be served as IRR. In IRR you do not drill, do not get paid and do not accrue retirement benefits (I think).

    As for residency, in your senior year of medical school you apply to the military match. Generally, if you match, you then do your military residency. If you do not match, you enter the civilian match, do your residency and rejoin the military after your residency. In some circumstances (more common in the Air Force than the Army), you can apply before the match for a deferment to avoid the military match and go straight to the regular match. This is ususally reserved for specialties that are not well represented in military programs.

    I hope this helps,

    Ed
     

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