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Arranging Rotations (How is it done)

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by WishUponAStar, Dec 2, 2001.

  1. Okay we've established that you can set up your own rotations in your fourth year, and maybe even some electives in the third year. From what I hear it depends on the school.

    So now I ask... What is involved in setting up your own rotations. Surely you don't just look in the phone book, pick some groovy hospital, and show up on Monday morning and say you are ready to rotate. What do you have to go through to actually find hospitals that are willing to let you rotate? Is it competitive to find opportunities outside of your own school's network of affiliations?

    So what sort of application process is there for being able to rotate in a certain place for a certain rotation? Is it difficult to arrange? Is there people who help arrange these sorts of things?
     
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  3. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    Nearly all medical schools have electives available for visiting students. If your school does not keep records on where previous students have rotated (and reviews of those electives), the easiest way to find the information is to look at the web sites of some programs you are interested in. Most will have info on Visiting Students, Electives, etc. Often the application is on-line and simply requires that you complete it, requesting dates of rotation, have your school verify that you are in good standing, will be covered by malpractice insurance, etc. Some schools charge tuition for electives but most don't. Submit the application and await word on whether or not you've been accepted.

    Not really tough to do at all - just make sure you apply well in advance during the "high season" - summer/fall before the match.

    Best of luck.
     
  4. proffit

    proffit ovary mcnugget
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    Not really tough to do at all - just make sure you apply well in advance during the "high season" - summer/fall before the match.

    Best of luck.[/QB][/QUOTE]

    Does 'not really tough to do at all' imply that the process is uncompetitive and that its not necessary to apply to many different hospitals? Is it best to shoot for a hospital at which one has a realistic chance of obtaining a residency in a given field, i.e. if one is interested in oncology with so-so grades, going for a rotation at sloan-kettering wouldn't be such a great idea (or a feasible one)? Thanks for the info..

    B
     
  5. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    When I said "not difficult to do at all" I meant the process, not the competitiveness. Like most things, some rotations are easy to get and others more difficult. Nearly all schools will require you to wait to be placed until their own in-house students have placed their requests for electives - meaning you get last choice.

    I didn't have to put in numerous applications for my electives and got everyone I requested, but I suspect more popular ones might cause you some trouble in getting them. I would check with your advisor and the program(s) in question when you choose and assess the competitiveness then, and see how many back up apps you should submit.
     

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