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As a doctor Would you treat John Edwards and his Family

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by dutchman, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. dutchman

    7+ Year Member

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    http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/03/22/edwards.2008/index.html

    Apparently, it seems like John Edwards wife's cancer is acting up. My question to you guys is: Knowing that this guy pretty much made a living off of suing the hell out of doctors(even in cases that we now know were meritless), would you treat him or his family in a non-emergency situation?
     
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  3. Critical Mass

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    If he was my patient, yeah I'd treat him if I thought that I could help. Why not?

    Would I take him as a new patient in a primary care sort of situation? Sure! He's probably got great health insurance. I'm thinking, however, that there might be a string of referrals in his future... Chest pain when you're bench pressing? Better consult a cardiologist just to be sure. Urinary frequency? Let me set you up with a great urologist. Cough? I know just the pulmonologist for you! :D

    The issue of whether he makes money off of suing docs is separate from his own need for healthcare IMO. This reminds me of one of those ethics questions that they give you at your med school interview.
     
  4. OncoCaP

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    Yes, certainly. I think this has been debated before (would you treat a trial lawyer).
     
  5. dutchman

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    Personally I would not. This is like sleeping with someone that told you they have AIDS. The guy is a walking lawsuit. Don't be surprised if he tries to sue the doctor taking care of his wife.
     
  6. anon-y-mouse

    anon-y-mouse Senior Member
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    No, of course not. I would refer him elsewhere. He needs the experience of being denied treatment, at least once. This would be just desserts. Of course, *some* doctor would see him after I (or that initial doctor) turned him away. Now if it were an emergency situation, I would obviously treat him.
     
  7. OncoCaP

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    Treating John Edwards' family would be like treating the family of other famous people ... only a few would get that privilege ... it's probably going to be one of the better known & respected physicians around and there would be extra security and privacy as well. If you do your work right, I don't think he would be more likely to sue. If you weren't one of the best in your field, you would never have the chance to treat his family anyway. If anything, he would be much less likely to sue because it would be a media circus that would distract from whatever political goals he has (the bar for filing a lawsuit would be higher). When was the last time you heard of a famous person (especially a politician) suing a physician?
     
  8. Critical Mass

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    Mr. Edwards, it appears that your stool is positive for occult blood. We're going to have to scope you, only you sued the company that makes the sedative, and your insurance company will no longer pay for the drug. You're going to feel a little bit of pressure now...
     
  9. anon-y-mouse

    anon-y-mouse Senior Member
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    True, true... BUT, many excellent physicians have been sued before as well, even those who are "good enough" to treat famous people. which isn't to say he would sue (I agree with your reasons why he wouldn't likely sue), but that wouldn't preclude me from giving him the stern message of "thanks for ****ing around with my colleagues" by turfing him to someone else.
     
  10. OncoCaP

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    Yeah, I see what you mean. It would be a shocker for the guy to get denied care. Unfortunately, it could also put whatever physician did that into the middle of a media firestorm. Maybe you could turf him (or his family member) without him knowing what happened. However, to give him a "message" when a guy like Edwards is so adept at playing to the media would be a very high risk move as far as I can tell. Talk about that physician being a marked man. Who knows, maybe such actions would attract trial lawyers in a "shark attack" to sue the pants off whatever physician dared attack the honorable legal trade. My guess is that the reason Edwards won so many high-profile trials is that he's a lethal pitbull in the ring. I wouldn't want to take him on unless I had a lot of cash (millions) to blow on my own lawyers and public relations people for such a battle and didn't care if I ever practiced medicine again (so totally not me -- I can think of a lot more enjoyable ways to spend millions and I wouldn't want to give up medicine for that message).

    In terms of messaging, denying him or his family member care could be playing right into Edwards' hands by giving another example of why the healthcare system is "broken" and needs to be fixed. I'm also not sure if Edwards could make a few phone calls and get your license revoked ... wouldn't surprise me if he could do some real damage to a physician's career in more ways than one. Even if by some miracle Edwards said, "I'm sorry for the improper lawsuits I filed" there are 1000s of other lawyers out there who have picked up where Edwards left off in terms of suing physicians.

    Reforming our malpractice system is important. Texas has taken some steps in the right direction by limiting malpractice awards. Maybe we could build on these initial successful steps. Denying Edwards' family healthcare just seems like a high risk / low yield strategy for malpractice reform (or even retribution, for that matter).
     
  11. THP

    THP Senior Member
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  12. mjl1717

    mjl1717 Senior Member
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    {lol} This q is so very serious but fun-ny at the same time.. Its not that I have no "guts". Im use to the PRESSURE. But Im trying to cut down on the grey hairs and why not let some other "V.I.P. pressure lover" take on the Edwards clan. Im not scared, Id treat him in an emergency.. So in medical slang Ill turf this one (refer him to someone else) [you ARE allowed to do this] and probably call in and treat John Murtha.. I dont like the idea of him suing doctors..:idea:
     
  13. psipsina

    psipsina Senior Member
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    ROTFLMAO!


    I would treat him, I pretty much view every patient as a walking lawsuit (kindof like assuming that every patient is HIV+) and cover my ass accordingly. You will get sued, that is out of your hands, but if you know the rules of the game you can prevent successful litigation, and I am just as confident in my ability to do this with a trial lawyer as any other litagous patient.
     
  14. Haemulon

    Haemulon Slippery When Wet
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    This is dumb. A decision to treat or not treat isn't made based on political differences of opinion or what someone does or has done for a living. :thumbdown:
     
  15. tulane06

    tulane06 Private Joker
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    I'd treat his wife, but not him.
     
  16. dilated

    dilated Fought Law; Law Won
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    Tell that to the MGH guys who operated on Charlie Weis and are currently in the midst of a BS lawsuit (in which the lawyer claims that lack of B-vitamin supplements caused his acute postop complications...).

    I wouldn't touch him with a ten foot pole. I wouldn't say it was because he was a lawyer, but I'd tell him my patient load was full or something. What's he going to do, hold a press conference to announce I said I wasn't taking patients?
     
  17. colbgw02

    colbgw02 Delightfully Tacky
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    I used to think like this, until I met and spoke with an excellent pulmonologist who got sued by the wife of a trial lawyer (after her husband passed away). The fact that this man smoked and was otherwise a walking MI was apparently lost on this woman and all of her husband's lawyer colleagues.

    The pulmonologist talked about how his and his family's life was disrupted for years and how he questioned his skills as a physician constantly. The pulmonologist did nothing wrong, and the verdict confirmed that, but it still doesn't change all the frustration, time, and money.
     
  18. Flightfire

    Flightfire Junior Member
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    I would treat him, but I wouldn't be happy about it. I would let him know that. This sounds cruel, but I think it would be poetic justice if his wife's cancer ended his political career.

    Hamlet
     
  19. Haemulon

    Haemulon Slippery When Wet
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    I hear ya. Perhaps I may change my opinion as well after getting burned. But at least right now, it doesn't seem to me that the lawyer is to blame, because he/she technically did not do anything wrong either. He/she was doing what was in the best legal interest of the client, right? After all, us future docs will need lawyers to protect our own interests as well, both within medicine and in our expanded personal and business enterprises. What really sucks is the way the system is structured. I can't blame the players for doing their best to succeed within the rules the game, even though I may scorn them as my opponents. Its the game itsself that sucks. Plus, let us also not forget that there are instances where physicans and other health care professionals are truly neglegent and actually do destroy people's lives. I have seen it all too frequently in the hospitals where I work. I am actually kind of glad that the threat of legal action is hanging around as part of a check and balance.

    Now I think things have probably swung too far in the direction of litigation to be sure. Docs certainly are getting pummled these days from a variety of directions. Not the least of which is the continuing threat of frivalous litigation, dimishing reimbursements/income, rising overhead, and loss of autonomy due in large part to increased involvement of insurance companies in health care decision making. And this doesn't even touch the increasing role of mid-level practioners and ultilization of outsourcing practices. It all sucks.
     
  20. Doctor Bagel

    Doctor Bagel so cheap and juicy
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    Of course I would. But then I'd even vote for him.
     
  21. sirus_virus

    sirus_virus nonsense poster
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    :laugh: :laugh: I don't know if you were trying to be raunchy, but that was funny.
     
  22. sirus_virus

    sirus_virus nonsense poster
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    To hell with that privilage. Even in an emergency situation, I will think hard before touching that guy.
     
  23. boulux

    boulux Member
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    A doctor treats patients. One who doesn't want to do that doesn't deserves his title.
     
  24. Stolenspatulas

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    I would refer him to someone I know who will refer him as well.

    Hopefully he goes through a string of physcians that tell him that he ruined a lot of lives just for the $$$$.... and that they are too concerned that he will make a nonsense lawsuit and ruin a career for no reason but money again. what a sad fool. I hope he stops that fake creepy smile of his soon.... that single-handedly lost him votes.

    Now, of course, in an emergency situation I'd treat him. Pandabear needs to get in on this.
     
  25. lil pook

    lil pook Senior Member
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    well that statement is a noble one, but also very naive.

    you will see as you acquire experience in the profession

    good luck
     
  26. mjl1717

    mjl1717 Senior Member
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    Id say you have a point.. But I think this trend of thought is easier to say from the outside looking in..
     
  27. dilated

    dilated Fought Law; Law Won
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    Absolutely. If we allow this, next we'll have doctors who won't treat people that won't pay them. How dare they presume to call themselves doctors?
     
  28. Boris Badenov

    Boris Badenov Member
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    Stage IV invasive ductal carcinoma? Good prognosis???

    That is some mighty strong Kool-Aid.
     
  29. mjl1717

    mjl1717 Senior Member
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    Flightfire, as my football coach use to say. "you have guts" That was a strong, cerebral comment..
     
  30. Haemulon

    Haemulon Slippery When Wet
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    Agreed.
     
  31. MJB

    MJB Senior Member
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    2 different cases...the first was the invasive ductal...
     
  32. sirus_virus

    sirus_virus nonsense poster
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    Dogpile.
     
  33. tulane06

    tulane06 Private Joker
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    Must have been a Freudian slip.
     
  34. naegleria brain

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    :laugh: well done!

    the question comes to your reason for medicine. is it a job, or a service? Medicine is a job, but unique in that you can make it a service if you want it to be. Those people usually go on missions to Africa treating Tb in Africa and whatnot. The vast majority of the rest of us are practicing medicine because it is our JOB.

    with that said, would you perform mouth-to-mouth on a passed-out hobo on the street? i wouldn't; i want to protect myself, even if it is unlikely i'll get anything from him. but i think in this case, the risk of being harmed is even greater, and self-preservation, unfortunately, is a quality that outweights my sense of preservation of others, especially when the "other" is a malicious lawyer.
     
  35. Thievery Corp.

    Thievery Corp. Covert Hipster
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    On the topic, this is very interesting read:
    http://fingersandtubesineveryorifice.blogspot.com/2007/01/eye-for-eye.html

    This is about an ER doc facing an interesting very similar problem.

    As for Edwards, it's simple. If it was emergency care-->yes
    If it was not emergency care-->referred on to someone who might better suit Mr. Edwards needs. (A.K.A turfed the F*@# out.)
     
  36. mdterps83

    mdterps83 Member
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    I see a lot of negativity in this thread, but I think it is directed at the wrong party. Yes, John Edwards sued a lot of doctors and bankrupted them. Yes, some of them didn't deserve it.

    But what a lot of you fail to realize is that the law is an adversarial system. For John Edwards and any other lawyer, his responsibility is to look out for the best interests of his client (much as any good physician would do) and maximize their welfare. For him not to do so is Legal Malpractice. Now, I'm not saying he had a legal obligation to sue even if he knows a lawsuit is bogus. But what I am saying is he was trying to do the best for his plantiffs, like all lawyers.

    I feel that the system is most at fault here. You are never going to have a system in which lawyers back off of cases that they will win just because they are bogus. That would be like giving back money. The system is at fault for letting these bogus cases win. The juries are at fault for misreading the evidence, and so on. Yes John Edwards is a bit of a slimeball, but when you have a system that allows poor cases to win, how can you expect him to not pursue them?
     
  37. Stolenspatulas

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    You can't place the blame on the system. He chose what type of law he wanted to practice. He chose it. He knew that he would ruin some doctors lives through his practice. For him not to realize that would be very naiive. He had to see that in some cases he would take the unethical route and ruin lives just for $$$$. He knew what he was doing and he was damn good at it so he made millions and millions continuing to do it. What an a$$hole. His wife's situation is tragic and incredibly ironic.

    It's like if a criminal shoots someone. Is it the gun's fault? Is it the ''system's'' fault since it allows guns to circulate? You have to place the majority of blame where its naturally due...
     
  38. lil pook

    lil pook Senior Member
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  39. dutchman

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    This is funny

    http://www.ontheissues.org/2004/John_Edwards_Government_Reform.htm
    "Q: Your position on the issue of civil tort reform?
    A: I am proud of my 20 years work against powerful insurance companies and drug companies. I believe we have the best legal system in the world, but it is not perfect and can be improved. For example, doctors and health care providers are facing rising malpractice premiums and are having difficulty getting reimbursement for the services they provide"

    What? Is he now physician friendly?
     
  40. tacrum43

    tacrum43 Behold the mighty echidna
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    I was thinking something similar. How is that a good prognosis? In another part of the article it mentions that her cancer is "treatable but incurable". That means eventually it will kill her, right? They seem so nonchalant about the whole thing. It's really quite sad, IMHO.
     
  41. THP

    THP Senior Member
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    This is such BS. He took those cases because he thought he had a good chance at making money, and could care less about the lives he was going to ruin (and indirectly affect countless other physicians). He is an unethical slimebag and I hope he burns in HeLL.
     
  42. thewarehouse

    thewarehouse Member
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    What about ethics? I know John Edwards has the legal knowledge necessary for filing lawsuits on behalf of clients, but should that ability be utilized and arguments made for a client when his case is clearly without any merit?

    Think about a physician who orders fake medical leaves-of-absence for his/her patients so they could get paid time off of work. Sure, it's in the patient's best interest to get time off, but does that make it right to do? I think at some point you have to stand back and say "This is outside of the range of what I see as my ethical obligation, and I can't do it," regardless of the money the client/patient is willing to throw at you to take their case.

    I'm not defending anyone here- if a doctor is negligent, he/she should definitely be held accountable, but when a lawyer takes a case knowing full well he'll be making money at the expense of an innocent person's career, doctor or no doctor, something isn't right.
     
  43. turkleton

    turkleton Capeless Crusader
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    I'd treat him, but be damn careful that I covered my a** every step of the way. By the way, since when is Stage IV metastatic breast cancer considered a chronic disease similar to diabetes? What the hell are his PR people trying to spin?
     
  44. Instatewaiter

    Instatewaiter But... there's a troponin
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    I'd send him over to a vet. Physicians can't treat snakes.

    But seriously, I would allow him to make an appointment. Then I would keep him in the waiting room for an extra hour or two, making sure people walked in to the waiting room after him and were seen before him.

    Then I would bring him back to a room and keep him waiting for another half hour. Finally I would come into the room and say, "Wow I just realized who you were. Sorry, but I really feel that based on my personal views you would get better health care from another doctor. I am going to write you a referral."


    I may be missing something here but this seems like the negativity is direct at the right party to me.


    I'm sure that was exactly what Edwards was thinking about. Couldn't have been his best interests in maximizing his money, could it?


    There is a relatively easy fix to all this tort reform. There is a system already in place to penalize lawyers who bring frivolous cases to court. It is not enforced much though. Strengthen this law and enforce it every time possible. Perhaps lawyers will then know how it feel to be embattled in a legal battle for their future.
     
  45. mdterps83

    mdterps83 Member
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    No actually it's not like that at all.

    First of all, I don't know the specifics, but I'm sure some of the doctors deserved to be put out of practice.

    He is being financially rewarded for being unethical. Now I know he shouldn't bring frivilous law suits, and it's unethical. But when you financially reward bad behavior, how can you expect otherwise? He is scumbag, but if you want to fix things, you aren't going to be able to do it by making everyone magically a saint. You are going to have to fix it so that people aren't rewarded for bringing bad suits. That's all I'm saying.
     
  46. QuikClot

    QuikClot Senior Member
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    The correct analogy would be to a lawyer that defends someone accused of murder. That is what Edwards' position was when he practiced. People chose to sue, and they get representation. Some 70,000 people die by medical error every year, and many more than that have signifigant morbidity. Yet the assumption seems to be that malpractice is evil because some doctors may not have done anything wrong -- that's not sensible. It's like saying that, because of those medical errors, doctors are money-hungry villians who don't care if their patients live or die.

    I'm sure if one enjoys getting their hate on, it's fun to imagine a malpratice attorney needing your help and slamming the door in their face. Perhaps later, you folks can fantisize about letting the girl who wouldn't date you in high school die of cancer. Realistically, one competent doctor is much the same as another. On the other hand, if you are accused of something that may ruin you -- gross malpractice, perhaps -- there is a big difference between the best lawyer in the country and the middle of the pack. And suppose you were to call the best lawyer in town and he were to say "Aren't you that doctor who is always villifying and abusing trial lawyers? Nu-uh." Now that would be poetic justice.
     
  47. Haemulon

    Haemulon Slippery When Wet
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    I would actually interpret this analogy differently. I think Lawyers would be analagous to the guns. They have their proper and improper uses, just like a gun. How the lawyers are utilized is equivalent to how a shooter utilizes a firearm. The system that encourages a particularly unsavory use of the lawyer (read: frivalous lawsuits against doctors) would be analagous to an environment that encourages the unlawfull and aggressive use of guns (such as a slum/ghetto area where gangs are permitted to operate unchecked due to lack of community investment and police presence in the area). So in this case, yeh ... there is a legal environment/system that encourages these types of lawsuits.

    I agree that the analogy is imperfect with my interpretation as well. Guns obviously can't think for themselves and lawyers can. But I just thought I would throw out a different perspective here. So many people seem to have such viceral and entrenched feelings against lawyers that perhaps not all angles are being fully appreciated? Isn't it a little pre-mature to become so jaded about malpractice litigation before even becoming a doctor? (not directed at any poster in particular).
     
  48. Haemulon

    Haemulon Slippery When Wet
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    Great post :thumbup: :thumbup:
     
  49. Stolenspatulas

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    Edwards' malpractice suits leave bitter taste


    By Charles Hurt
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The American Medical Association lists North Carolina's current health care situation as a "crisis" and blames it on medical-malpractice lawsuits such as the ones that made Democratic vice-presidential candidate Sen. John Edwards a millionaire many times over.
    One of the most successful personal-injury lawyers in North Carolina history, Mr. Edwards won dozens of lawsuits against doctors and hospitals across the state that he now represents in the Senate. He won more than 50 cases with verdicts or settlements of $1 million or more, according to North Carolina Lawyers Weekly, and 31 of those were medical-malpractice suits.

    During his 20 years of suing doctors and hospitals, he pioneered the art of blaming psychiatrists for patients who commit suicide and blaming doctors for delivering babies with cerebral palsy, according to doctors, fellow lawyers and legal observers who followed Mr. Edwards' career in North Carolina.
    "The John Edwards we know crushed [obstetrics, gynecology] and neurosurgery in North Carolina," said Dr. Craig VanDerVeer, a Charlotte neurosurgeon. "As a result, thousands of patients lost their health care."
    "And all of this for the little people?" he asked, a reference to Mr. Edwards' argument that he represented regular people against mighty foes such as prosperous doctors and big insurance companies. "How many little people do you know who will supply you with $60 million in legal fees over a couple of years?"
    Through a spokeswoman, Mr. Edwards declined to comment beyond e-mailing his and John Kerry's "real plan for medical-malpractice reform."
    The plan calls for one measure that Mr. Edwards previously had said is meaningless and does not impose caps on verdicts for economic damages or limits on attorneys' fees.
    One of his most noted victories was a $23 million settlement he got from a 1995 case — his last before joining the Senate — in which he sued the doctor, gynecological clinic, anesthesiologist and hospital involved in the birth of Bailey Griffin, who had cerebral palsy and other medical problems.
    Linking complications during childbirth to cerebral palsy became a specialty for Mr. Edwards. In the courtroom, he was known to dramatize the events at birth by speaking to jurors as if he were the unborn baby, begging for help, begging to be let out of the womb.
    "He was very good at it," said Dr. John Schmitt, an obstetrician and gynecologist who used to practice in Mr. Edwards' hometown of Raleigh. "But the science behind a lot of his arguments was flawed."
    In 2003, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists published a joint study that cast serious doubt on whether events at childbirth cause cerebral palsy. The "vast majority" of cerebral palsy cases originate long before childbirth, according to the study.
    "Now, he would have a much harder time proving a lot of his cases," said Dr. Schmitt, who now practices at the University of Virginia Health System.
    Another profitable area of litigation for Mr. Edwards was lawsuits against psychiatrists whose patients committed suicide.
    In 1991, he won $2.2 million for the estate of a woman who hanged herself in a hospital after being removed from suicide watch. It was the first successful medical-malpractice case in Mr. Edwards' home of Wake County.
    During jury selection, Mr. Edwards asked potential jurors whether they could hold a doctor responsible for the suicide of their patients.
    "I got a lot of speeches from potential jurors who said they did not understand how that doctor could be responsible," Mr. Edwards recalled in an interview shortly after the trial. Those persons were excluded from the jury.
    In the end, Mr. Edwards scored $1.5 million for "wrongful death" and $175,000 in "emotional distress" for the woman's children.
    "One thing I was grappling with was how to explain to the jury the difference between loss of companionship and society — the things under the wrongful-death statute — and emotional pain and suffering, which superficially sound like the same thing," he said at the time. "What we did was to tell them the wrongful-death damages are for the loss of all the things that a mother does for the child. But the emotional pain and suffering damages represent the grieving. The pain is something you feel over the death of your mother."
    In 1995, as Mr. Edwards neared the pinnacle of his success, Lawyers Weekly reported on the state's 50 biggest settlements of the year.
    "Like last year, the medical malpractice category leads the new list, accounting for 16 cases — or 32 percent — three points better than last year," the magazine reported. "By and large, that upward trend had held since 1992, when only four [medical malpractice] cases made the survey."
    Mr. Edwards was singled out.
    "Another reason for this year's [medical malpractice] jump was a strong showing by the Raleigh firm of Edwards & Kirby," it reported. "Partner John Edwards was lead counsel in eight of the 16 medical malpractice cases in the top 50."
    Later in that article, Mr. Edwards was interviewed about the $5 million he won from doctors who delivered Ethan L. Bedrick, who had cerebral palsy. Mr. Edwards credited the jury focus groups that he routinely used to help prepare his arguments.
    "They gave me several bits and pieces of information to use when addressing the jury," Mr. Edwards was quoted saying. "You can use them to decide whether to get involved in a case or whether to accept a settlement offer, but our primary use is trial presentation."
    The article went on to observe: "Focus groups can be put together for as little as $300, according to Edwards — a small investment compared to the $5 million won in Bedrick."
    It is not clear just how much Mr. Edwards made as a lawyer, but estimates based on a review of his lawsuit settlements and Senate records place his fortune at about $38 million.
    Like many Democrats, Mr. Edwards has benefited from the generosity of fellow trial lawyers, who have given millions of dollars to Mr. Edwards' political campaigns and other political endeavors.
    Part of the platform that Mr. Edwards is running on includes medical-malpractice reform. The Democrats' plan would go after insurance companies that increase doctors' premiums and ban lawyers and plaintiffs for 10 years if they file three frivolous lawsuits.
    One tenet of their plan would "require that individuals making medical-malpractice claims first go before a qualified medical specialist to make sure a reasonable grievance exists."
    However, Mr. Edwards said in a 1995 interview that such pre-screening is unnecessary.
    "Pre-screening as a concept is very good, but it's already done by every experienced malpractice lawyer," he told North Carolina Lawyers Weekly.
    As a result of these and other cases, insurance rates for doctors have skyrocketed — putting some out of business and driving others away, especially from rural areas. And doctors who have lost cases to Mr. Edwards have been bankrupted.
    Patients, meanwhile, are left with rising health care costs and fewer — if any — doctors in their area. It is increasingly a nationwide problem, physicians say.
    Dr. VanDerVeer, the Charlotte neurosurgeon, recalled one recent night on duty when two patients arrived in an emergency room in Myrtle Beach, S.C., where the area's last neurosurgeons quit earlier this year.
    "No one in Myrtle Beach would accept responsibility for these patients," he said. And because it was raining, the helicopters were grounded, so the patients were loaded into ambulances and driven the four hours to Charlotte.
    Upon arrival, one patient had died, and the other learned that she merely had a minor concussion — and a $6,000 bill for the ambulance ride.
    "That's just one little slice of life here," Dr. VanDerVeer said. "It's a direct result of the medical-malpractice situation that John Edwards fomented."
    Dr. Schmitt had spent 20 years delivering babies in Raleigh. Though he had no claims against him, his insurance tripled in one year. With no assurances that his rates would ever drop, or just stop rising, he left town.
    For Mr. Edwards' part, he doesn't necessarily begrudge the doctors he sues.
    In the book he wrote while campaigning for president, "Four Trials," Mr. Edwards referred to the doctors who he'd won millions from in two cases.
    "In the E.G. Sawyer case and the Jennifer Campbell case, the defendants were not malevolent but were caring and competent doctors who worked in good hospitals and yet made grievous mistakes," he wrote. "They had erred in their judgment, but no one could despise them."
    Doctors, however, take it all a bit more personally.
    "We are currently being sued out of existence," Dr. VanDerVeer said. "People have to choose whether they want these lawyers to make gazillions of dollars in pain and suffering awards or whether they want health care."
     
  50. Said doctor is also human, as are his fellow doctors who may be more understanding.

    Seeing as how I would be biased from the start, sure, I'd probably like to refer him to someone that isn't, if reasonably possible. It's better for all parties involved.

    Non-emergent only, of course.
     
  51. Dr. McDreamy

    Dr. McDreamy resident hottie
    2+ Year Member

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    this actually made me feel ill reading it. this man is scum.
     

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