calone

10+ Year Member
Oct 4, 2007
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Pre-Medical
Hi guys,

I would like to work in developing countries as physician and wanted to ask people, including students at BGU-MSIH, who are also considering working in developing countries - how do you plan on paying back your loans?
It seems that you need some years of experience as a physician before you can work in agencies like doctors without borders or other similar groups whether it's a paid job or not. So, you could work in a hospital back in your country and pay back some while you are there, and perhaps start working in developing countries in a few years when your financial situation is better. Is this the general plan of students thinking about working in developing countries?
I'd appreciate your inputs..
Thanks.
 
Last edited:

jrouwhorst

New Member
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Oct 31, 2004
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Medical Student
Actually, there's good news regarding loan repayment for anyone with a serious interest in doing full-time international relief work, at least for students who paid for medical school using federal US DoE loans (Stafford, GradPLUS).

A law was passed, I believe in 2009, where essentially all federal loans can now be paid back on a sliding-scale basis. If you work for an NGO and make $15,000 per year, your minimum monthly "sliding-scale" payment would be close to zero. If a person is working for a non-profit or government agency, and makes 10 years of consecutive minimum payments (while being fully employed), then their loan is entirely forgiven after 10 years.
 

blkprl

10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Apr 5, 2004
139
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Medical Student
Hi guys,

I would like to work in developing countries as physician and wanted to ask people, including students at BGU-MSIH, who are also considering working in developing countries - how do you plan on paying back your loans?
It seems that you need some years of experience as a physician before you can work in agencies like doctors without borders or other similar groups whether it's a paid job or not. So, you could work in a hospital back in your country and pay back some while you are there, and perhaps start working in developing countries in a few years when your financial situation is better. Is this the general plan of students thinking about working in developing countries?
I'd appreciate your inputs..
Thanks.

Any updates on this issue?

I am planning to go back to Africa soon after residency training and was wondering how this works?
 

chocomorsel

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May 24, 2006
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Me too. I will be finishing residency next year and would like to relocate back to Kenya by mid 2013. Was planning on working in the U.S for one year and paying back at least half my loans, then putting some money in savings, sell everything, buy a car and move on home. The remainder of the loan I was planning on repaying back using income based repayment system which I think would be very affordable.

Just started contacting hospitals and waiting to hear back. Looking at missionary and private hospitals so far as they are better equipped with meds/machines/staff etc.

I sure hope it works out. Whichever way, I am an American citizen and if hard up I could come back month/two out of the year and make some quick money if time allows. We will see.

Choco