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Asthma in Army Mil Med

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daveyjwin

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My fiance is in the HPSP, and is at the end of her 3rd year of medical school. She was recently diagnosed with Asthma after months of coughing and wheezing. I know that asthma itself is a disqualifier, and frankly, we think this may be a blessing in disguise as she has been second guessing the army decision for a while. She hasn't reported it to her recruiter yet, but has plans on doing so in the future.

Now, I guess my question is, is she likely to get discharged from the army for this? If so, what happens then. If not, why not, and how do we make this more likely?

Thanks.
 

Perrotfish

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Be prepared to pay everything back that you have received. It may be a possibility.

Not only can they make you pay back EVERYTHING that you owe, they can also charge you huge late fees if you fail to pay it back, in full, by the end of the month.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2214913/posts

If not, why not, and how do we make this more likely?

Also, this is a ****ty question. Your fiance made a commitment and should honor it. I'm all for honesty with the recruiter and if they say she can't stay because of her diagnosis that's fine, but trying to figure out how to best spin this to weasel out the commitment she made is sorta pathetic. Also, be aware that this is a public forum and in the event you need to go to trial, like the girl in the article above, your statements on public forums can be used against you. Don't write a lot of notes asking people 'how can I get my fiance out of her military commitment'.
 
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daveyjwin

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Be prepared to pay everything back that you have received. It may be a possibility.

That would be fine, as expected. I know someone who was Honorably discharged from the AF, and was able to work something out with our Financial Aide department as much as that is concerned.
 

daveyjwin

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Also, this is a ****ty question. Your fiance made a commitment and should honor it. I'm all for honesty with the recruiter and if they say she can't stay because of her diagnosis that's fine, but trying to figure out how to best spin this to weasel out the commitment she made is sorta pathetic.

While this is true, and she should have done more research on the subject prior to committing to it, there was blatant lying done by the recruiter, and false advertising in general as well. Nonetheless, the fact is that she is in now, and doesn't want to be, so if she can use this to her advantage, that would be great.

However, I don't want this to turn into one of those threads, so I'd like to keep this type of response to a minimum, if possible.
 

psychbender

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How bad is the asthma? Judging from things I have heard from this forum, and patients/doctors I've seen at MTFs, it may just result in a profile. Asthma is a waiverable condition for commissioning, and it seems that once you are in, it is damn hard to be medically DQed as a doctor. Your fiance is more useful than the money you could pay back, and they can probably still use her, even if she is nondeployable because of a medical condition.

She is required to file yearly updates as to her medical status, and this needs to be filed as part of that update. I would hold off celebrating a release from the Army, though.
 

daveyjwin

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The asthma has been making her cough and wheeze pretty bad since about November. I couldn't tell you how bad yet as she is just starting treatment for it, but I suppose we'll see. Well, we aren't having a celebratory party just yet, we are just looking at it as a potential, and trying to be optimistic. Even simply become non-deployable would be a little victory.

Also, is this likely to have any effect on her residency placement? She is looking into Walter Reed.
 

backrow

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While this is true, and she should have done more research on the subject prior to committing to it, there was blatant lying done by the recruiter, and false advertising in general as well. Nonetheless, the fact is that she is in now, and doesn't want to be, so if she can use this to her advantage, that would be great.

However, I don't want this to turn into one of those threads, so I'd like to keep this type of response to a minimum, if possible.

Two words: Caveat Emptor

As to becoming one of "those" threads: sorry, you're going to end up with one by coming on here and asking how to get someone out of something they signed up for. You're not going to get much sympathy around here. These kind of people get make my blood pressure go way up, but I'll leave the rant alone.

If she signed up for a four year scholarship and you want out, here's the plan: do your internship at Walter Reed, do a four year GMO tour and get out.
 

BigNavyPedsGuy

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The asthma has been making her cough and wheeze pretty bad since about November. I couldn't tell you how bad yet as she is just starting treatment for it, but I suppose we'll see. Well, we aren't having a celebratory party just yet, we are just looking at it as a potential, and trying to be optimistic. Even simply become non-deployable would be a little victory.

Also, is this likely to have any effect on her residency placement? She is looking into Walter Reed.

1) It might matter if she's on daily meds or just PRN for cough/wheeze.

2) Not deploying might be a victory for you, but just remember that all she is doing is making someone else meet that obligation. Someone else will have to leave their spouse, kids and comfy home to put themselves in harm's way for your "little victory". It's not like there are any less deployments to go around. It just means that she isn't helping out.

You say you don't want it to become one of "those" threads. By "those" threads I'm assuming you mean the ones where dozens of docs who have left spouses behind and done deployments get upset about your "little victory"?

I do know a doctor in my department that has asthma that requires meds and just got back from deployment.
 

grayce79

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Lol! Discharged for asthma?!? That is hilarious!
There are a lot things that will disqualify you from getting into the military initially but once you are in, you are in.
There are some things that will get you discharged such as suicidal depression or losing an extremity, etc. But besides that, be prepared to suck it up.
If her asthma is severe, they will just put her on a profile and she will end up non-deployable. But since her asthma would not interfere with her being able to see patients, she will still have to pay back her time!
 
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244913

Read it, specifically the section on asthma.

Not even profile-worthy unless it interferes with the APFT, or your wearing of a gas mask etc.

She has a choice: act like a soldier or become like the rest of the useless mouths, these civilians in uniform who infest the MEDCENS

Decision time.

61N
 
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edmadison

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Read it, specifically the section on asthma.

Not even profile-worthy unless it interferes with the APFT, or your wearing of a gas mask etc.

She has a choice: act like a soldier or become like the rest of the useless mouths, these civilians in uniform who infest the MEDCENS

Decision time.

61N

Just to build on this:

It's important to realized that entry standards and retention standards are completely different. In the Army, entry standards are governed by AR 40-501 Chapter 2 while retention standards are governed by AR 40-501 Chapter 3. As the OP's spouse is already commissioned, chapter 3 is the appropriate regulation. In this instance, the individual must be evaluated to determine if she has asthma as defined by the regulation. Per the reg, PFTs would be required. Assuming that she does have asthma, following treatment, an assessment needs to made:

  • Has she had repeated hospitalizations, ER visits or excessive time lost from duty?
  • Does she need repetitive use of oral steroids to perform all military training and duties?
  • Can she pass the 2-mile run on the APFT?
  • Can she wear a protective mask?

If she fails to meet these criteria, she will be submitted to an MRB (Medical Evaluation Board), this board would then determine if she could stay in the army.

It is very unlikely that they would let her out of her obligation unless she has severe persistent asthma. Further, if her asthma is controllable on inhaled medication she will be deployable. We had MANY soldiers in my brigade that had asthma, some fairly significant.

Ed
 

Homunculus

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It is very unlikely that they would let her out of her obligation unless she has severe persistent asthma. Further, if her asthma is controllable on inhaled medication she will be deployable. We had MANY soldiers in my brigade that had asthma, some fairly significant.

Ed

as a battalion surgeon in the sandbox right now, i can second this. we've evac'd one (who has since returned), and breathed a huge sigh of relief when the advair finally came in for the rest of them.

at least half the evacs i've encountered were not surprises, and have been soldiers who, IMO, shouldn't have been deployed to begin with. but someone out there has a nice "made 50/56 non-deployable servicemembers deployable" bullet statement on their OER.

anyway, asthma definitely isn't the magic key. the only thing i've seen work first hand was exercise induced urticaria. and even she got a nice non-deployable billet to pass the time. they'll waiver damn near anything if it means you can generate some RVU's, lol.

--your friendly neighborhood on his 3rd (and so far, favorite) FOB now combat pediatrician battalion surgeon
 

BlueIsis

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Have you ever noticed that everyone is thrilled with HPSP until one of two things happens?

1. They enter a relationship and the spouse/SO isn't too thrilled about the situation, or

2. They get to third or fourth year and suddenly the light bulb goes off that they made A COMMITTMENT THAT THEY WILL NEED TO HONOR.

I actually hope they let your girlfriend out because otherwise I'll be left holding the bag when she repeatedly gets pregnant to avoid deployment (and other such dirtbag techniques), and perpetuates the bad rep that female military servicemembers have for this kind of crap!

Before the flames start:

1. I am female.
2. I have prior commissioned AD time.
3. I had a baby while on AD. I just did the responsible thing and timed it to occur while on a shore tour.

Please don't eff your buddies. Do your time (with a facsimile of a smile on your face). Please don't be a morale sump. When your payback is done, get out and live your life.
 
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