August too late for this PT???

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by DrCookie, Feb 13, 2001.

  1. DrCookie

    DrCookie Junior Member

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    Hello all.. its been awhile since I have posted... Wanted to inquire if August is too late of a date to take my MCAT.. I would like to start filing my app ASAP but the April date isnt conducive to my schedule, plus I am just starting to prepare for the MCAT now. Id like to take a summer prep course. I will be a senior in the fall and just wanted someone's opinion!!! Is it unheard of to even take it April of senior year? I wanted to take time off anyway, a year to work and relax, take some grad classes...

    Is it totally unheard of to have a Physical therapist turned DO, PM&R specialty??? Any thoughts are welcomed!!!

    Cookie
     
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  3. ewagner

    ewagner Senior Member

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    Actually PM&R has been a consideration of mine for a long time...but it is already alot like PT and I would have to deal with many of the same things I left and WANTED to leave behind in PT.
     
  4. Neurogirl

    Neurogirl Resident Extraordinaire

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    No, August isn't too late, but it does mean that you won't get any interviews until later in the season, since most schools won't grant interviews until they have your scores. Don't take it next April unless you plan to sit out a year.

    BTW, because of our background in manual medicine, PM&R programs LOVE DO applicants...according to someone I know who matched to his first choice program last year.
     
  5. ewagner

    ewagner Senior Member

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    Just remember, PM&R has some of the same pitfalls that PT does, AND referral competition with orthopods, FP, neurologists etc. The future is solid, but a question of when supply and demand will meet (similar to what happened to PT's)
     
  6. DrCookie

    DrCookie Junior Member

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    Ewag-

    I dont think I am understanding your take on this situation... What pitfalls did you see in PT and why exactly did you choose to go onto DO school? I am assuming it wasnt simply for another degree, cause you could have gone to community college for that!! Am I biting off more than I can chew by going into PT!! I am less than a year from being done... I think its a great degree to have, marketable, given youre in the right scope of practice and area of the nation.

    I just think seeing as I want to pursue a rehab area of medicine as a DO or as a PT that they will dovetail well into a PM&R field. So I just wanted some clarification...Thanks!!!

     
  7. drusso

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved

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    I think that you'll have a huge advantage as a PT in PM&R---being a DO will help too [​IMG]

    Ewanger makes some good points about competition, but I think that the field is putting more effort into increasingly public awareness among patients and PCP about what physiatrists do. This is also the Bone&Joint decade! As long as we prevent organized PT from independent practice privileges, PM&R will remain intact.

    PM&R docs are widely recognized as *THE* specialists for SCI and are also doing well to create a name for themselves in TBI and Stroke (the bread&butter of rehab). Things on the inpatient side are moving towards specialist driven "disease management" programs. The orthopods don't want to bother with rehab since being in the OR is more lucrative, and the neuro's just don't have the musculoskeletal background to be good rehab docs...curiously though there are fellowships on the neurology side in "neurorehabilitation." I'm not sure how this differs from PM&R exactly. Maybe this fellowship is for neurologists who wish they had gone the PM&R route. That leaves things pretty open for PM&R docs.

    On the outpatient side, there's talk that the federal government is on the cusp of designating physiatrists as "preferred providers" for all occupational medicine related injuries. If this happens it will be a huge boon to the field as most HMO's and insurance companies follow guidelines set by the feds. Frankly, the field is just beginning to catch-up with the outpatient side of PM&R. Most successful PM&R docs are doing well in outpatient settings, but have largely developed outpatient skills on their own--injections, blocks, flouro-guided stuff, etc. The bulk of PM&R training is still inpatient-based which is great if want to do stroke, TBI, or SCI, but lacking if you want to do occ med, sports med, and pain. And don't forget OMT; I know more than a few PM&R DO's who have told me that OMT is great practice builder.

    Just some thoughts...

    [This message has been edited by drusso (edited 02-14-2001).]
     
  8. ewagner

    ewagner Senior Member

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    Well, I only have limited time to respond...I must return to the daily H&P's, and this topic is worthy of a few pages.

    My opinions are not only my own but based on some of the thoughts that other PT's have conveyed as well as a select few Physiatrists and surgeons.

    Since you have not started or are early in your clinical rotations Cookie...it is hard for you to get frustrated. PT has gone through many cycles in many years regarding the "best" field to work in (regarding reimbursement and job satisfaction) and therefore has shown CONSIDERABLE instability. PM&R, though somewhat immune to these cycles, will ALWAYS have competition problems when placed into private practice. Sure, within the hospital setting, Rehab docs have a set pt. load. BUt how many physiatrists are needed per hospital?? And when will supply = demand (saturation).
    Yes, Rehab docs are the authorities on SCI, rehab of TBI and CVA...but that is the neuro aspect. It is a considerable challenge to fight for the LBP referral or the chronic pain referral. ANd have you ever tried to treat a chronic back pain pt? FRUSTRATION. Occupational Med?? No way, that is the pinaccle of frustrated "puppet work" for Ins. Co's...I have done it and the burn out is awful. Anesthesia has the market on pain management or fluroscopic guided injections...though manual therapy would be a nice nitch.

    Yes, it may be a natural progression, and I would bet you would excel, but you must first be exposed to ALL aspects of medicine and understand that the clinical experience found in a PRACTICING PT can be utilized all aspects of medicine. Give yourself some time.

    [This message has been edited by ewagner (edited 02-15-2001).]
     
  9. DrCookie

    DrCookie Junior Member

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    E- I am barely 20 years old, young as a person and very young in my views of medicine/PT.... of course I am going to be a little optimistic/altruistic in my views, afterall they are shaped by the professors I seek to imitate in thought on exams!!

    I havent been on any affiliations yet, will be this summer and am at a point where I want to decide if I want to go right on to medical school or wait a year, maybe work or something and then go on with some work experience under my belt. I dont want to be in school my entire life so my feeling is that I want to continue on while I am used to hi demand studying and having no social life!! Is this a wise thought or not?? Another consideratioon... I am not taking the MCAT in April because I have had a vacation planned for awhile now and not gonna put it off...

    I dont want to see PT's go autonomous.... what would separate us from chiropractors??? besides letters after our names...

    Cookie
     

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