n618ft

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Was looking into practicing in Australia - are there any recommended sites for information about doing a residency or moving there after a residency in the US? :D
 

jaketheory

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Was looking into practicing in Australia - are there any recommended sites for information about doing a residency or moving there after a residency in the US? :D
unless you have finished at least 2 years ACGME residency you would have to take the australian medical council exams and do an aussie internship year (or equivalent). the current situation is that competition for internship spots is getting fierce among locals because the government has increased the places in medical schools to address doctor shortages but have yet to increase postgrad med training to a corrspending level. as an FMG, you will have least priority in accessing an internship allocation. if you are lucky enough to get one it will likely be in remote outback.

things may be slightly easier if you can get aussie permanent residency, though that wont change your fmg status so it certainly wont wipe out your biggest problems. however, current visa application processing times are looking at 2 or more years unless you have an occupation on the critical skills list. not sure if medical practitioners are currently on the CSL, but if they are, you would first have to be registered in Aus, which as above will require either 2 years US residency (to get provisional registration to undertake a year work placed based supervision) or amc exams and an aussie internship.

not good time for fmg's in oz. most of the international med students in oz will likely have to leave when they graduate because they will unlikely be able to get an internship (or would rather return home than work in a rural area).

fmg's are also restricted for 10 years to working in the public health care sector unless they go rural.
 

n618ft

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Hey great responses - thanks! I'll have to just be patient here then for a bit... seems the most conservative way would be to complete residency in the US, no? If medical practitioners are still on the CSL by then, it should work out nicely.
 

jaketheory

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Hey great responses - thanks! I'll have to just be patient here then for a bit... seems the most conservative way would be to complete residency in the US, no? If medical practitioners are still on the CSL by then, it should work out nicely.
they they are still on CSL by when? when you start residency? or when you finish residency?

If you are to do residency in the US, your US training will likely be considered somwhat deficient in Aus, thus you wold likely be required to complete some period of additional Aus training or a period of supervised practice.
 

redshifteffect

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they they are still on CSL by when? when you start residency? or when you finish residency?

If you are to do residency in the US, your US training will likely be considered somwhat deficient in Aus, thus you wold likely be required to complete some period of additional Aus training or a period of supervised practice.
You most certainly would be asked to write your Australian fellowship exams, which might further slow the whole process down.
 

jaketheory

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You most certainly would be asked to write your Australian fellowship exams, which might further slow the whole process down.
redshift, i know for FRACGP there are categories of overseas trained gp's which are not required to sit the fellowship examination. their overseas training makes them eligible for fellowship ad eundum gradum. see http://www.racgp.org.au/overseastraineddoctors.

i also believe that there would be certain cases when a fully trained overeas subspecialist in medicine would not have to take the RACP exam, but this is more a hunch than anything. the racp will consider candidates on a case by case basis. if we are talking about a physician trained in the US, completion of a US internal medicine residency will definitely require considerable training further training in aus. this is because aus physician training requires an internship year plus 6 years of sub-specialty training, even for general internal medicine. however, if someone has completed both a 3 year internal med residency plus a 3 year subspecialty fellowship, i feel they could probably convincingly show their training is equivalant to aus training given US training generally requires more hours per week, especially if the applicant has post-fellowship professional experience. again, i cannot confirm this, just the impression i've got from reading things.
 

redshifteffect

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redshift, i know for FRACGP there are categories of overseas trained gp's which are not required to sit the fellowship examination. their overseas training makes them eligible for fellowship ad eundum gradum. see http://www.racgp.org.au/overseastraineddoctors.

i also believe that there would be certain cases when a fully trained overeas subspecialist in medicine would not have to take the RACP exam, but this is more a hunch than anything. the racp will consider candidates on a case by case basis. if we are talking about a physician trained in the US, completion of a US internal medicine residency will definitely require considerable training further training in aus. this is because aus physician training requires an internship year plus 6 years of sub-specialty training, even for general internal medicine. however, if someone has completed both a 3 year internal med residency plus a 3 year subspecialty fellowship, i feel they could probably convincingly show their training is equivalant to aus training given US training generally requires more hours per week, especially if the applicant has post-fellowship professional experience. again, i cannot confirm this, just the impression i've got from reading things.
Yeah i think the FRACGP have a couple of ways to get registration without sitting their exams, and they also consider GPs from certain countries differently. The FRACP college however operates a little differently and have been known to make overseas trained doctors including Americans take their fellowship exams. However as you correctly pointed out this is on a case by case basis and the only way to find out would be to apply. I also think there would be a difference between applicants with a post IM fellowship and ones with just gen IM. As for the other colleges their requirements vary widely.
 
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jaketheory

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I also think there would be a difference between applicants with a post IM fellowship and ones with just gen IM. As for the other colleges their requirements vary widely.
that's what i am saying. having done just gen IM in the US, you would have to complete the the RACP training program because FRACP requires 6 years training including training in a subspecialty.

A US IM grad would have to complete 1 year of basic physician training because you cannot advance directly into advanced training and australian trained physicians must complete at least one year of basic physician training in Aus.

However, if you are a fully qualified subspecialist, i.e. you've completed a fellowship post IM residency, things COULD be different. If your fellowship was under 3 years you would probably have to complete further training to make up defeciencies. i don't know what form this might take given you cant go straight into advanced physician training, as i said above. theyd probably make up some supervised position for you, such as clinical fellow, with the term fellow indicating the job title not fellowship of the specialist college.

if the subspecialty fellowship training was 3 years or more and depending on your background (i.e. years of professional experience since completing training, etc. . .) you would probably be able to convince them that your training is equivalent to Aus training and bypass the exams.

however, some of this is just my opinion and not necessarily fact.