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Australian Internship after US Med School

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Texas Tiger

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This may have already been answered, but I thought I'd ask it anyway. This fall I am going to start an MD program in the US. I have always loved Australia. I love the The Great Ocean Road, Phillip Island, New Zealand, the Australian lifestyle, all of it. Most of all however, I love scuba diving and the Great Barrier Reef. I've always had my eyes set on moving there. I'm wondering how easy it is to become a practicing physician in Australia. I know that residency is different. Instead they do specialist training in an "internship." I've also heard there is a moratorium on international physicians practicing in major cities for 10 years. I don't mind that. I usually like small towns. Does that mean I'm out in the middle of the outback though or could I be in somewhere like Townsville? Any help you could provide on this would be great. Thanks!
 

thomas pynchon

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You have no chance at getting an internship as a non Australian/non Australian med student.
 

Texas Tiger

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Therefore, practicing in Australia is an impossibility? Do they have plans on increasing their internship position numbers in the future?
 

thomas pynchon

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The schools got greedy (big surprise) and increased student numbers to far more than the health system needs, resulting in a surplus of med students/interns to the point that some interns will be splitting time and others will outright be denied internship, and it is only expected to get worse as numbers continue to rise. There was some guy posting about moving out to Australia but he was already an established older consultant in the US---thats essentially your only hope, but a long ways away.
 

neulite30

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There are so many threads/posts on this topic, it's amazing. Of course, I completely and utterly sympathize with those who are curious - the differences in definitions used and overall structure of training only adds to the confusion for those who are trying to search for their options.

As generally speaking as it gets, you have 2 options: attempt to get an internship after your MD or finish your residency training in the US and migrate as a specialist.

As a side note, there is a trend in the states now for medical schools to switch to a 3 year MD degree. Seeing as some Family Medicine programs are 3 years, you could theoretically finish it all in the time it takes to get one of the Australian 6-year medical degrees (going out of fashion now though).

Not to mention the American Board of Family Medicine has a reciprocity agreement with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.
 

Texas Tiger

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That is very disappointing. It sounds like America's current Pharmacist crisis - drastic increase in output without a matching increase in demand. I hope things change over the next 5 years or else it looks like Australia may just be a vacation destination.
 

thomas pynchon

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You can read about it by searching 'australian medical internship crisis' or something along the lines

Everyone has their own interpretation but the basic idea (and the true one) is that schools flopped during the financial crisis and decided to jack up enrollment with full fee paying international and domestic students, and saddle the government with the resultant tsunami of medical graduates. Of course the schools have managed to spin this into an issue with greed on the end of the government but it's pretty obvious to anyone with a basic understanding of economics whose fault this is.
 
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Texas Tiger

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There are so many threads/posts on this topic, it's amazing. Of course, I completely and utterly sympathize with those who are curious - the differences in definitions used and overall structure of training only adds to the confusion for those who are trying to search for their options.

As generally speaking as it gets, you have 2 options: attempt to get an internship after your MD or finish your residency training in the US and migrate as a specialist.

As a side note, there is a trend in the states now for medical schools to switch to a 3 year MD degree. Seeing as some Family Medicine programs are 3 years, you could theoretically finish it all in the time it takes to get one of the Australian 6-year medical degrees (going out of fashion now though).

Not to mention the American Board of Family Medicine has a reciprocity agreement with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

Yes, the different terminology and systems make it hard to understand. In addition, the number of trolls and banned users make it even harder for me to tell what is old news versus legit and current.

Australia and the US both have such outstanding medical training that it seems strange that it isn't easier for physicians to go between the two continents.
 

Texas Tiger

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I didn't think you could use an American residency to practice in Australia. I read on another thread that you need to do the internship to practice medicine in Australia. Is that not true?
 

neulite30

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Again, read the links I posted above. It's all in there.
 

neulite30

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One of the big issues with migrating to Australia as a Consultant(Australia)/Attending(US) is getting your qualifications recognized. Training in the US does not just automatically transfer internationally on completion. The respective specialty colleges (Royal Australasian Colleges of GP, Surgeons, Pathology, Dermatology, etc.) dictate what they require for you to be recognized in "Australasia" as one of their specialists, thus they may have higher or lower standards. You may have to undergo further training/supervision whilst getting paid as a registrar (resident) or you may be required to take and pass a specialty exam (almost always required).

If you are required to undertake an additional few years of training (remember, specialist training in Australia is typically longer and they have set a MINIMUM amount of time for you to complete this), you may be responsible to find your own training position in a hospital (registrar position). These spots, like the infamous intern crisis, preference Australian citizens and permanent residents first. Hence, it will be easier if you migrate to Australia with your PR or citizenship. There are, of course, exceptions to this (i.e. reciprocity agreements) and I recommend you use the above resources and contact the respective training college for further information about its requirements.
 
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