bkpa2med

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Jun 26, 2004
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$81,000
 

Crosnmafingers

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Jan 30, 2008
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Right...maybe in Canada...

The average salary for a Hospitalist in this country would be approximately $210K with higher pay in the midwest and southeast and possibly lower pay on the west coast and in the northeast. You'll be making much more than $81K regardless...unless you work part-time (which isn't a bad deal either).

Try salary.com or any other salary search engine to see if I'm BS'ing you...

The link from the above poster is about right -- make sure you click on benefits to get a full picture of the salary (base+bonuses+benefits)...
 

Big Sneez

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May 13, 2008
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... with higher pay in the midwest and southeast and possibly lower pay on the west coast and in the northeast. You'll be making much more than $81K regardless...unless you work part-time (which isn't a bad deal either).

That matches the info I've come up with. I just found some survey data on Hospitalist workload and compensation here: http://my.quantiamd.com/player.jsp?d=7068d0fa39a1c9f67e9bd9f48c551638&g=24945&cid=53&r=1&u=cl65

It confirms higher pay in the south and midwest, and slightly increasing average pay overall. The salary info is about a minute and a half in.
 

MidwestMD

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It also depends on whether you work for an academic hospital or community hospital. Average salary for academics is ~$156K + bonuses (anywhere from $10-$15k) for midwest programs that I've seen.
 

HarryRosenMD

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Hi...

The average Hospitalist salary ranges from about $170 to $220,000 depending mainly on:

1. Geography: Eastern states paying more
2. Private vs. Academic: Private paying more
3. Group vs. Individual practice: Individual having the potential to make a great deal more than the average. Especially with low overhead and independant contractor status.

The question of salary is not as important, however, as lifestyle. I now work as a private solo Hospitalist... finding, on most days, to have plenty of time to be home with my family. It all depends on how you structure your day/ commitments.

Hope that helps
 

0382938

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In the link posted by big sneeze, it does say that pay is higher in the South and Midwest (contradicting Dr. Rosen's statement above, and in contrast with the salary trends in other fields). Any thoughts on why this is so, if indeed it is? I assume it's a supply and demand issue?
 

t33sg1rl

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I'm in the Midwest and a hospitalist friend told me to ignore any offers that don't have a base starting salary of at least $150,000 (plus standard bonuses, moving allowance, etc).
 

Hysty

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Im looking for a hospitalist job for j1 waiver. Offers I have from my recruiter are between 180-200k. But I have not yet asked her about signing bonuses or moving expenses. Any idea how much should we ask for?
 

elwademd

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Jun 25, 2007
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Im looking for a hospitalist job for j1 waiver. Offers I have from my recruiter are between 180-200k. But I have not yet asked her about signing bonuses or moving expenses. Any idea how much should we ask for?
if you can work it, you'd really want the company/entity you're going to work for to cut a check directly to the moving/relocation company. if the company adds moving expenses to your income, that just raises your amount of taxable income. having the company directly cut a check to the moving company avoids that. of course if they're not willing to do it that way, then you don't really have a choice. as far as the amount to receive for moving expenses of course depends on how much stuff your moving (1 bedroom apartment versus 4 bedroom house), how far you're going, and time of year.
 

Soupbone

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Sep 24, 2001
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I am currently a hospitalist in NYC

It pretty much depends on the set-up.(Employee vs group, production bonus, and area of the country, and how hard you are willing to work)

Salary ranges from in the northeast anywhere from $150k to 250k.

My friends in the south are doing at least 200k and up. I have friends in Texas making >275k in Texas, but are busting their ass for that kind of production.

Anyone that is making less than 145K is doing part time (like a nocturnalist), in a employee situation working a straight 40 hours a week, or just doesnt know the market :(
 

NRAI2001

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The $200k salary is with a one week on and one week off work schedule right?

I know in my area the hospitalists make about 180K but work one week on and one week off.

Can you work more than this (1 on and 1 off) to make more?
 

elwademd

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The $200k salary is with a one week on and one week off work schedule right?

I know in my area the hospitalists make about 180K but work one week on and one week off.

Can you work more than this (1 on and 1 off) to make more?
depends on the situation/company/group. there are so many different forumulas/set ups. when i was applying/interviewing this year, i heard of:
a. 7 on, 7 off
b. 5 on, 5 off
c. m-f 8-6, q 3 weekend call
d. 7 on, 7 off... and an extra day every 2 weeks that you can keep or give away (arranged by you) to others in the group

i also know of a former resident from my program who works tuesday, wednesday, and thursday nights 7pm-7am, and takes sporadic weekend call where he's paid a flat rate for being on call, and gets some sort of fee per patient admitted.

some groups will pay a flat salary and tell you the expectations upfront in regards to schedule, er call, consults.
others pay based on productivity, with the thinking that the more you admit and do when you're in the hospital, the more money you make.

so, you can work more than 7 on, 7 off, less... just depends how flexible you are, and finding what you truly want out of a hospitalist position.

also, some places are pure hospitalist (i.e. no clinic), and others have an expectation of daily clinic for hospital followups.

there's a lot of variability out there, and there is, in my opinion, something suitable for everyone.
 

analgold09

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I am currently a hospitalist in NYC

It pretty much depends on the set-up.(Employee vs group, production bonus, and area of the country, and how hard you are willing to work)

Salary ranges from in the northeast anywhere from $150k to 250k.

My friends in the south are doing at least 200k and up. I have friends in Texas making >275k in Texas, but are busting their ass for that kind of production.

Anyone that is making less than 145K is doing part time (like a nocturnalist), in a employee situation working a straight 40 hours a week, or just doesnt know the market :(
Where would you say you fit in the 150-250 range you gave: upper, lower, or middle? Was it easy finding an attractive hospitalist job in NYC (in terms of set-up and salary), or is the market pretty saturated?

Thanks!
 

Soupbone

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Where would you say you fit in the 150-250 range you gave: upper, lower, or middle? Was it easy finding an attractive hospitalist job in NYC (in terms of set-up and salary), or is the market pretty saturated?

Thanks!
Depends on what your definition of 'attractive'

If you have dreams of practicing in Manhattan, then you are going to be looking at the lower end of that spectrum. In the outer borroughs, the salaries tend to be higher.

Its tougher than other areas of the country to find a job here ..supply/demand...more people want to live in NYC than bumblescrew Alabama.
 

NRAI2001

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Do people ever use a hospitalist job as a segway into a fellowship? Lets say they apply to cardiology but dont get a position anywhere; can they work as a hospitalist for a 2 or 3 years then reapply succesfully? I knew of one guy who did this but he was doing cardiology research at the same time as he was doing hospitalist work.

Is doing hospitalist work seen as an effective way to boost your resume and your chances of matching into a fellowship? Or would doing research likely be a better way to do so? Maybe a masters degree or mph?
 

mcandy

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Do people ever use a hospitalist job as a segway into a fellowship? Lets say they apply to cardiology but dont get a position anywhere; can they work as a hospitalist for a 2 or 3 years then reapply succesfully? I knew of one guy who did this but he was doing cardiology research at the same time as he was doing hospitalist work.

Is doing hospitalist work seen as an effective way to boost your resume and your chances of matching into a fellowship? Or would doing research likely be a better way to do so? Maybe a masters degree or mph?
Relax and pass gross anatomy first my friend. It will be there. You got 6 years before your worry about that,
 

gutonc

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Do people ever use a hospitalist job as a segway into a fellowship?
No. But some people do use it as a segue into a fellowship.

I've found more people use Rascals around the hospital than Segways.
 

GassiusClay

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I was wondering if any hospitalists on this forum can send me some info on their lifestyles and location in the US. I'm looking mainly at the Chicagoland region, maybe like the suburbs, but any info helps.

7 on, 7 off sounds awesome.
 

hospitalistdoc

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Those of you thinking of doing hospitalist medicine should now that pay and working conditions vary greatly from organization to organization. When deciding on a position it is very important to consider issues such as availablity of specialists and administrative support. If these areas are lacking the job is miserable, no matter what the salary is. That being said I have 3 years experience in the field and have seen the pay increase significantly every year. Supply and demand. I currently make 225+ base and am receiving offers between 230-300 throughout the country. I put my name out there and had 10 interview offers in 24 hours. Pay is lower in most metro areas but the programs are more established and the pay is increasing. One big thing to look for is turnover. If a program has a lot of turnover of hospitalists there is usually a reason.

The poster that inquired about the segue into fellowship should know that it is a double edged sword. Fellowship is about connections. If you work as an academic hospitalist and can buddy up to faculty in the department it may be helpful, but it is not advantageous to go to a nonacademic postition.