Average Moonlighting Pay?

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by cm7b5, Mar 15, 2002.

  1. cm7b5

    cm7b5 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2001
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am just curious as to what residents, on average, get paid for moonlighting? I have heard anywhere from 40-100 dollars per hour? Is this true?
     
  2. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Cuts

    Cuts Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've heard varying reports ranging from $400-1000/night net (i.e. in pocket). Sounds nice to me... one night of work and I can buy that Tag I've wanted for so long lol...
     
  4. jargon124

    jargon124 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    3
    Is moonlighting generally done within one's specialty? Or are people able to "cross over" - for ex - an EM resident moonlighting in IM?. How can residents have enough time to moonlight anyhow? Wouldn't programs generally frown on this? I'm :confused:
     
  5. tussy

    tussy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1999
    Messages:
    714
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I've moonlighted a couple of times covering ICU call when there are not enough residents on the service to cover the call schedule. It pays $40-60/hr (canadian). It's good money if you have a quiet night of call and can sleep (unusual). The shifts are in high demand as all the residents need the money, so you can usually only get 1 shift/month.
     
  6. UAB

    UAB Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2002
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    So, is it possible to moonlight in the same program or institution, or it must be in an institution other than yours?
    Thanks
     
  7. tedsadoc2002

    tedsadoc2002 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2000
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    1
    It is frowned upon by some places, but others allow it either within their institution or some satellite clinic affiliated with the institution. For example, when I was researching programs prior to the application process (checking FRIEDA and the program's website), I made sure to find out if moonlighting was permissible. During the interviews, I asked the residents if it was allowed and where they went to do these moonlighting shifts. It certainly helps knock down some of the debt, in fact, at one program, one resident said she had almost finished paying off her school loan!

    Some residents covered shifts within their own hospital, others (at other programs) did it at a satellite clinic affiliated with their hospital (their attending staff may have positions there). When I interviewed in NYC (not Manhattan) the residents I met with said that they were going to Long Island, Connecticut, and other NY counties north and west of the city, they nentioned it being very difficult to get shifts unless you went to these places.

    As for time to do the shifts: days off, holidays, vacation days. Sorry for the long post. :cool: :cool: :cool:
     
  8. Voxel

    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2001
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    2
    Let's not forget nursing home call. I have a friend who is a 3rd year internal medicine resident and he moonlights in a local nursing home. He calls it sleeping for dollars. It's quiet most of the time unless there is a code. :) He says he gets 5-6 hours of sleep in a 6pm-6AM shift, although those hours are not necessarily continuous. He says he gets about $600 per call, so that's about $50/hr.
     
  9. neutropeniaboy

    neutropeniaboy Blasted ENT Attending

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2002
    Messages:
    947
    Likes Received:
    184
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by JGDLB:
    <strong>So, is it possible to moonlight in the same program or institution, or it must be in an institution other than yours?
    Thanks</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">It depends on your stage in training, whether there is a moonlighting "group" (sort of like an I.P.A. for moonlighters in a region), whether the hospital system is a competing system, or whether you're performing within your specialty.

    Many residency programs frown upon moonlighting and some specifically prohibit it. Fellows seem to have a little more freedome, especially the ones not getting any salary during their fellowship.

    There are plenty of cross-over opportunities. The last plastics fellow I worked with moonlighted as an "intern" and as a SICU resident.
     
  10. neutropeniaboy

    neutropeniaboy Blasted ENT Attending

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2002
    Messages:
    947
    Likes Received:
    184
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Cuts:
    <strong>I've heard varying reports ranging from $400-1000/night net (i.e. in pocket). Sounds nice to me... one night of work and I can buy that Tag I've wanted for so long lol...</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Ugh...start getting out your 1099 forms and quarterly filing.
     
  11. Future GI Guy

    Future GI Guy Hoo Hoo....

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2001
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    3
    I said this in another thread, but, the residents in IM here say that there's 60 bucks an hour to be had in Nursing Homes or in a county jail.

    Pretty good, if you ask me.
     

Share This Page