Sep 2, 2015
1
0
Status
Post Doc
Hello! This is my first post. I am working on a 3 year postdoc. I am getting the experience of my dreams and the postdoc allows me to do both academic and clinical work. I was not even going to think about EPPP until January next year. But yesterday I found out that my wife is pregnant. I now feel a lot more pressure to get licensed (or provisionally licensed) and maybe work a part time job during the week as a provisionally licensed therapist. However, in my state you cannot become licensed until the completion of a one year postdoc. Here is my question. Is it worth it to become provisionally licensed? If I start studying now I could achieve this by early next year or is it better to just wait to do the whole process? Anybody have experience in this?
 
Last edited:

MCParent

Bronze Donor
7+ Year Member
Jan 10, 2012
1,592
1,410
Status
Psychologist
Pretty sure you need to do the provisional step in Texas on the way to license regardless; you don't get to just go straight to licensed.

http://www.tsbep.texas.gov/how-to-become-licensed

A. Licensed Psychologist(Independent Practice)
Requires prior licensure as a Provisionally Licensed Psychologist (see below)
Requires a doctorate degree in psychology
Requires the passage of the Oral Examination
Requires two years of supervised experience
Board rule 463.11 and 463.13.
 

Ollie123

10+ Year Member
Feb 19, 2007
4,795
1,355
Status
Psychology Student
Can we assume from your username you are in Texas?

A lot of advice will vary tremendously by state. I'm debating the merits of applying for provisional licensure myself (albeit for different reasons). I settled on not doing so just because it will necessitate my taking the EPPP at a time that would likely be better spent focusing on compiling a K grant and getting my academic work up and running. So I can procrastinate a little on that until I have at least a little research momentum built up. Though the state practice laws are written so poorly and the board is so tremendously rude and unhelpful that I have no idea if this will come back to bite me later (its somewhat unclear whether I qualify to practice as a "trainee" or not).

I think a lot will depend on what options you have available to you for additional employment and what your current financial situation is (i.e. is this just an "AHHHH!!" moment or do you need the money? And do you need it more than the time?).
 

PsyDr

Psychologist
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2005
2,897
2,611
Status
Psychologist
You have to be provisionally licensed in Texas before you can be fully licensed. Provisional license also requires you to pass the EPPP. IIRC, the Texas board requires an oral test that is only available 1-2 times per year. I have heard from colleagues in Texas that this can be a major road block, forcing some people to have to wait 5-6 months to take orals.

If I were in your shoes, I would get licensed asap.

You should check if provisionally licensed persons can bill in Texas. If so you could possibly negotiate for a raise or find a side gig.
 

bmedclinic

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
May 9, 2008
901
241
Status
Psychologist
OP,
I'm not in Texas, but I am a proud Texan!
Anyways, I have the experience recently of studying for the EPPP while my partner was pregnant. I can only share my perspective, but if possible, I'd try to knock out the EPPP prior to having a child. And that means, if possible, prior to the 3rd trimester... because after that (and esp 35 weeks) it could literally be any time.

Also, as I now have a 3mo old, I cant imagine trying to study anytime in the last few months. Not trying to scare ya, but say maybe now is the right time. If you just found out your wife is pregnant, you're probably 30 weeks away from reaching that critical time. Maybe you can fit it into that window?
 

bmedclinic

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
May 9, 2008
901
241
Status
Psychologist
You have to be provisionally licensed in Texas before you can be fully licensed. Provisional license also requires you to pass the EPPP. IIRC, the Texas board requires an oral test that is only available 1-2 times per year. I have heard from colleagues in Texas that this can be a major road block, forcing some people to have to wait 5-6 months to take orals.

If I were in your shoes, I would get licensed asap.

You should check if provisionally licensed persons can bill in Texas. If so you could possibly negotiate for a raise or find a side gig.
IIRC in Texas if you can be provisionally licensed, you can also be (via less licensing requirements) licensed as a psychological assistant... and I know they can bill.
 

AcronymAllergy

Neuropsychologist
Moderator
Gold Donor
7+ Year Member
Jan 7, 2010
7,337
1,644
Status
Psychologist
You have to be provisionally licensed in Texas before you can be fully licensed. Provisional license also requires you to pass the EPPP. IIRC, the Texas board requires an oral test that is only available 1-2 times per year. I have heard from colleagues in Texas that this can be a major road block, forcing some people to have to wait 5-6 months to take orals.

If I were in your shoes, I would get licensed asap.

You should check if provisionally licensed persons can bill in Texas. If so you could possibly negotiate for a raise or find a side gig.
I've heard the same, particularly if you wait too long to sign up for the upcoming oral exam and it fills up, forcing you to then have to wait for the next one >6 months away.
 

MamaPhD

Psychologist, Academic Medical Center
7+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2010
2,075
1,942
Status
Psychologist
I'm a licensed psychologist in Texas. It's a good idea to get the process underway sooner rather than later. Feel free to PM me.
 

Koogy

Dreams, passions, & purpose = fulfillment
Jan 4, 2015
113
15
Can anyone state how soon is the earliest one can take the EPPP? Do most states require one to have the doc degree in hand or can it be taken prior to degree completion?