AnesNavy

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So, I'll be starting my CA-1 year soon and would like some advice on books to purchase. Currently, I'm a surgery prelim and have been reading Baby Miller from my hosipital's library in my spare time. I managed to buy these few today:

1. Clinical Anesthesiology by Morgan and Mikhail

2. Anesthesiology Keywords Review by Modak

3. Anesthesia Unplugged by Gallagher

4. Anesthesia Oral Board Review by Lovich-Sapola

5. Review of Clinical Anesthesiology by Connelly and Silverman

6. Anesthesiology Review by Faust

My intention is to get a solid foundation and at the same time do well on the ITE and AKT. Any advice from current residents would be greatly appreciated. On another note, congrats to everyone that matched! :thumbup:

-anesnavy :cool:
 

veetz

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I like Clinical Anesthesia by Barash. It provides much more depth than the Lange book, which I use as well.
 

Narcotized

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1. Clinical Anesthesiology by Morgan and Mikhail

2. Anesthesiology Keywords Review by Modak

3. Anesthesia Unplugged by Gallagher

4. Anesthesia Oral Board Review by Lovich-Sapola

5. Review of Clinical Anesthesiology by Connelly and Silverman

6. Anesthesiology Review by Faust

-anesnavy :cool:
1- Solid.
2- Homie don't do keywords. I didn't see the point of random noncomprehensive trivia. Just my opinion. Others find it useful (I think).
3- Unfamiliar with it.
4- Oral Board Review before the "How to setup a room" lecture? I wouldn't hit that one anytime soon.
5- Unfamiliar with it.
6- Solid.
 

Sapdaddy

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1- Solid.
2- Homie don't do keywords. I didn't see the point of random noncomprehensive trivia. Just my opinion. Others find it useful (I think).
3- Unfamiliar with it.
4- Oral Board Review before the "How to setup a room" lecture? I wouldn't hit that one anytime soon.
5- Unfamiliar with it.
6- Solid.

#4 the "letter from the associate editor" specifically explains how to use the oral board book as a basic clinical review book.
 

rsgillmd

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So, I'll be starting my CA-1 year soon and would like some advice on books to purchase. Currently, I'm a surgery prelim and have been reading Baby Miller from my hosipital's library in my spare time. I managed to buy these few today:

1. Clinical Anesthesiology by Morgan and Mikhail

2. Anesthesiology Keywords Review by Modak

3. Anesthesia Unplugged by Gallagher

4. Anesthesia Oral Board Review by Lovich-Sapola

5. Review of Clinical Anesthesiology by Connelly and Silverman

6. Anesthesiology Review by Faust

My intention is to get a solid foundation and at the same time do well on the ITE and AKT. Any advice from current residents would be greatly appreciated. On another note, congrats to everyone that matched! :thumbup:

-anesnavy :cool:
AnesNavy, 1 and 6 are good books. 6 is really good for quick last minute review. But I think you've spent a lot of money on books that will probably just end up on your shelf rarely opened.

Finish reading Baby Miller cover to cover. Take advantage of the easy reading in Lange. But invest in one of the more established textbooks like Miller or Barash as a reference.

I personally would not have bought a keywords book. The ABA will tell you what your individual key words are and then you can review them in a more solid book. You'll easily figure out from your colleagues and this board which concepts tend to be repeatedly tested.

I don't know anything about books 3-5.

If you really want a oral boards book that covers basic clinical questions well, I would go with Yao and Artusio.

I applaud you for your enthusiasm. Keep it up.
 

AnesNavy

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Hey, thanks for the replies. Just a few comments to the questions/comments.

1. I used my book money to make the purchases, so money was not a factor. I still have close to a grand left, so figured I might as well stock the bookshelves.

2. I agree I should learn how to set up a room first, but I was shown the Anesthesia Oral Board Review text by a resident at Case Western when I was interviewing and was very impressed with its content. Plus, I dont think it will hurt to learn early how to verbally communicate my knowledge and treatment plans.

3. I have no idea why I bought the keywords book. Seemed like a good idea at the time.

4. Baby Miller and Lange are my main books for now. I've flipped through Barash at the library a few times, but it's a little dense for me at the moment.

5. I've met Dr. Gallagher and think he is a great guy. At the time, I didn't know he wrote review books, just happened to see this one at the bookstore and really like it.

6. The Review of Clinical Anesthesiology (#5) is a question book to Barash. I couldn't find a good question book, so since I read here and there from Barash, figured I might as well do questions.

7. Purchased the Faust text because I hear you guys refer to it alot on here. Haven't even opened it yet.

Thanks again, more comments/ questions welcomed.

-anesnavy :cool:
 
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pgg

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6. The Review of Clinical Anesthesiology (#5) is a question book to Barash. I couldn't find a good question book, so since I read here and there from Barash, figured I might as well do questions.
I thought this question book was not as good as Hall, and if you're going to pick a set of questions to start off with, Hall is probably a better choice.

I did most of the questions in Connelly, generally in concert with reading the chapter in Barash, though I didn't make it through the whole thing. Most of the questions are reasonably good, but there seemed to be a fair number of WTF/who-cares trips off into the weeds. Moreso than Hall, anyway.


Stoelting's Anesthesia and Co-Existing Disease is a good one to have at home; Benumof's Anesthesia & Uncommon Diseases is another that I got less use out of, but is still good. The essence of what separates us from our midlevel colleagues is our thorough understanding of comorbid conditions and their anesthetic implications. These books are good quick references.

I found Jaffe's Anesthesiologist's Manual of Surgical Procedures to be very helpful early in residency. Don't know if it's worth buying (I barely cracked it after my CA1 year) but it's one to look for in your department or resident library.

Agree that Yao is a good clinical scenario book. Reed's Clinical Cases in Anesthesia is a similar book but is shorter / more superficial ... at times it's nice to be able to get through an entire case in 10-15 minutes of reading.

Marino's ICU book is great for your unit months.


From your username I'm guessing you're HPSP; are doing an outservice or inservice residency?
 

Narcotized

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I thought this question book was not as good as Hall, and if you're going to pick a set of questions to start off with, Hall is probably a better choice.

I did most of the questions in Connelly, generally in concert with reading the chapter in Barash, though I didn't make it through the whole thing. Most of the questions are reasonably good, but there seemed to be a fair number of WTF/who-cares trips off into the weeds. Moreso than Hall, anyway.
Oh ok, that question book. It's actually on my book shelf lol. Agree with what is said here that there are better question books. I'm a big fan of questions (old tests, and books with explanations of the answers). They present material in a different light that often tends to stick more in question form than bland text book memorization.

I also agree Anesthesia and Co-Existing Disease is a book shelf staple, and Jaffe is a great book to read for tomorrow's cases. A rep bought us each Jaffe so I do have my own copy. It's expensive.

Anesnavy, sounds like you are off to a good start and should do fine.
 

DrN2O

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What's the point of getting so many books at once? More weight to carry when you move. Pick Lange or Baby Miller to read cover to cover for the end of intern year and the start of CA-1. More than enough to own the AKTs. Jaffe from the library for your first 6 months to do your preops. Read Reed or Yao for clinical scenarios for kicks. Hall or old ITE questions before the ITE-1. Questions from Hall are straight ripoff of the old tests, but this year's ITE questions were different/harder. The other books are probably good for specific diseases the night before or subspecialty rotations, but not really cover to cover as a CA-1, so just get it from the library. In any case, your program will probably give you a set of books that you won't break the shrink wrap until much later. Cheers.
 
Last edited:
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So, I'll be starting my CA-1 year soon and would like some advice on books to purchase. Currently, I'm a surgery prelim and have been reading Baby Miller from my hosipital's library in my spare time. I managed to buy these few today:

1. Clinical Anesthesiology by Morgan and Mikhail

2. Anesthesiology Keywords Review by Modak

3. Anesthesia Unplugged by Gallagher

4. Anesthesia Oral Board Review by Lovich-Sapola

5. Review of Clinical Anesthesiology by Connelly and Silverman

6. Anesthesiology Review by Faust

My intention is to get a solid foundation and at the same time do well on the ITE and AKT. Any advice from current residents would be greatly appreciated. On another note, congrats to everyone that matched! :thumbup:

-anesnavy :cool:
As a new CA-1, you should probably, as advised, start by reading the Baby Miller from cover to cover before looking at other books. However, reference books are good to have - best on CD/online than as dead trees, IMHO.
1. That's kind of the reference. There is a new edition coming out next month, I think. I hope you didn't get one of the last ones from the old edition... If your department has a subscription to accessanesthesiology.com, you can have access to this book (and others published by McGraw-Hill) online, but obviously not books from other publishers.
2. Not familiar with it.
3. Good for procedures. Trying too hard to be funny. Useless for regional.
4. I used Board Stiff by Gallagher. Not familiar with this book. For the orals, you need mostly practice rather than reading a book.
5. Good question book, a bit outdated (unless there is a new edition I'm not aware of)
6. Good book organized by short topics rather than big chapters. In the same vein, but more practical, I just saw at teh bookstore something that just came out, called the Anesthesiology Guide. Full color, very practical. I am thinking of buying it, but I was hesitating between paper and Kindle. Does anyone have it and would you recommend it?