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Best neurology programs

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by Crazy Carl, Jun 2, 2002.

  1. Crazy Carl

    Crazy Carl Member
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    Pretty straightforward question...US News aside, what schools do you think have the best neurology programs?
     
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  3. gatormed

    gatormed Member
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    I think the US News ranking is thrown off by the fact that they consider neurosurgery and neurology as one field. For example, the UF neurology dept has been struggling recently but they have an incredible neurosurgery dept. The result is a very respectable rating in US News.
    From talking to some of the younger faculty the schools I have been told to look into are UVA, Rush, Henry Ford, Iowa, Mayo, Mt. Sinai, Michigan, UCSF... I'm sure I'm leaving some out but that's a start.
     
  4. Crazy Carl

    Crazy Carl Member
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by gatormed:
    <strong>I think the US News ranking is thrown off by the fact that they consider neurosurgery and neurology as one field. For example, the UF neurology dept has been struggling recently but they have an incredible neurosurgery dept. The result is a very respectable rating in US News.
    From talking to some of the younger faculty the schools I have been told to look into are UVA, Rush, Henry Ford, Iowa, Mayo, Mt. Sinai, Michigan, UCSF... I'm sure I'm leaving some out but that's a start.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Yea, the lumping together of neurosurgery and neurology is part of why I asked (the other part is me not wanting to take US News at face value). Even so, I'm surprised that none of the big-time ivy league schools are on your list...
     
  5. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    Moving to Rotations and Residencies...(maybe Neurogirl will see it and respond)
     
  6. Pinky

    Pinky and the Brain
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    The following are excellent neurology programs that will provide you with excellent training.

    In no particular order:
    Columbia
    Partners (Mass Gen/Brigham Womens)
    Johns Hopkins
    Penn
    Baylor
    Duke
    Emory
    Mayo
    Michigan
    Wash U
    Cleveland Clinic
    U Wash
    UCSF
    UCLA
    UCSD
     
  7. Pinky

    Pinky and the Brain
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    Let me clarify my statement above. The programs I listed above will provide you with solid clinical training as well as ample research opportunities.

    You need to figure out what you want from a program.

    In Chicago, Rush is indeed the best for clinical training. However, little basic science research is being done there. So if research is your thing....

    Likewise, U of Chicago is the top program for neuro research in Chicago, but their clinical training is not at the same level.
     
  8. saffron

    saffron Senior Member
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    hey this is slightly tangent, but im going to be first year in fall and am really interested in neurology (but not neurosurgery)...1- how hard is it to get a neurology residency?

    2- also, since at most schools you dont do a neuro rotation till 4th year, how do people get exposure to it? (b/c i hear that doing well in the rotation of the field you want to go into is really important- like if you wanna do obgyn, then you have to do awesome during your obgyn residency, etc).

    3- what are some things (research?) that you can do to increase your chances of getting a good neuro residency?

    thanks for helping a confused 1st year :)
     
  9. Jim Picotte

    Jim Picotte Senior Member
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    I'll try not to be too offensive to the neuro residents, but right now neuro isn't terribly competitive (although this could change) and a lot of med schools have a required month of neuro and if yours doesn't, you'll get exposed to it enough during just about every rotation. There's a lot of neurological problems/diseases out there and you'll see them on just about every rotation you do in medical school.

    As for the research question...I'll leave that to people who have a clue about that one.

    Good luck.
     
  10. kasimagore1

    kasimagore1 Member
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    I have a similar question as well. I know it's not hard to match into a neurology program, but the tops ones are always difficult to match in regardless specialties. I have browsed through several research oriented neurology programs (eg. Hopkins) and they have disproportionate number of MD/PhD residents. What does it take to get matched into these programs if one has only MD? Research? Publications? High step 1 score?(and what's considered competitive for residencies at say Hopkins, Mayo, or UCSF--220s, 230s, or &gt;240s?) or steller grades and LORs from Neurology rotations? Anyone willing to share some thoughts on how to match into these research oriented programs?
     
  11. imajin78

    imajin78 Junior Member
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    I was wondering if anyone knows how the programs in ny/nj/pa are ie. jefferson, lij montifiore..
     
  12. Neurogirl

    Neurogirl Resident Extraordinaire
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    Sorry it's taken me so long to respond, but I've been busy! Someone above noted that "right now, neuro isn't terribly competitive". Historically, neuro has been and relatively speaking, still is, an easy match. However, it is starting to become more popular. A few years ago the percentage of spots being filled by IMGs was something like 60-70%. Now it's around 20-30%. In any event, it's still an easy match for AMGs. I don't have the exact numbers because the San Fransisco Match Service no longer makes that info public. I think those currently registered, and going through the process can still access the data...let me know whether or not that's the case.

    Obviously, some programs are more highly regarded than others, however, it's very difficult to provide a "best program" list. It's better to take a systematic approach and narrow the list based on your personal preferences and professional goals. The first thing to consider is whether you want to go into academia or private practice. If you know you want to be an academic neurologist or research scientist, look for programs with ongoing research in areas that match your own interests. For a list of strictly academic programs go to the American Neurological Association web site.

    If you're interested in becoming a clinician, you should look for programs that offer very broad clinical training, good outpatient clinics and a fair amount of elective time. Additionally, make sure you know about fellowship opportunities. You should focus on those programs that currently offer fellowships in your sub-specialty of choice.

    In general, when investigating any program, try to obtain the following info: program completion rate, board pass rate (first attempt)(the RRC requires a 60% pass rate to maintain accreditation), "faculty to resident" ratio, didactics, whether or not there is a scheduled board review series, call schedule, benefits, work load and the "resident roster". Although virtually ALL programs will have a few IMGs, be wary of "all IMG" programs (if you are an IMG, please don't be offended, it's nothing personal...just the way it is). Also, once you register with the SFMS, you can get a list of currently unfilled positions. Sometimes positions go unfilled because the PDs are just picky, but often, it's because there is some type of problem. These programs should be carefully scrutinized.

    Finally, DON'T underestimate the importance of location! This is especially true for those going into clinical neurology. It's very common for clinicians to end up practicing in the same area as their residency. During the course of 3-4 yrs, you'll make alot of connections, so try to choose an area of the country in which you'd like to settle.

    Happy Hunting! :D
     

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