Best Pharmacology Texts and Why

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by 8675309, Mar 18, 2001.

  1. 8675309

    8675309 Member
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    Please post what you think are the best pharmacology books and why
    Thank you
     
  2. Lippincott, Lippincott, Lippincott. Great drawings, easy to understand. No MCQS/USMLE type questions which is its drawback.

    For those who prefer more wordy type books, I think Katzung is the best. Well written, but LOOKS boring and difficult. Most of the Lange books do for some reason - but they are among the best, IMHO.
     
  3. Hippocrates

    Hippocrates Member
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    Goodman and Gilman's
    The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics.

    I used it in Grad school and it was very helpful. It's easy to find the information.
     
  4. Pilot

    Pilot Senior Member
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    The best overall book you could possible buy is a Fact's and Comparisons, but it is expensive. It lists every drug available in the US, including many which are in clinical studies currently. It is updated monthly, and the updates can be added to the book (which is in three-ring binder format)

    Second best buy is a USPDI - still expensive, and not organized as well as F&C. You receive monthly updates as well, but cannot be added to the book since it is a hardback book.

    PDR sucks - I don't who has "sold" physicians on this book; I think it must be supplied free by a drug company. I can't count the number of times a doctor has called me for info on a drug and stated "I can't find anything about in my PDR."

    Goodman & Gilman's. I had this in school, and found my F&C to be much more helpful. I have the 8th edition (1993), and I think it has been updated one or two more times. It may be more helpful now, but I doubt it.

    A reference book even 1 year out of date is bad - I think over 400 new drugs have been introduced in the last three years - How many might be missing from your book if you don't get one that is updated monthly.

    Pilot, R.Ph., MS1
     
  5. When you get to the wards, get yourself the Tarason's Pocket Pharmacopeia or the "Chinese Letters" Pharmacopeia (sorry can't remember the name). EVERYONE has them and the residents EXPECT that you have them - can't count the number of times I was asked to borrow it, have it handy, etc.
     
  6. lord999

    Pharmacist Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    My favorite list:
    Textbooks:
    1. Bertram Kazung's Pharmacology.
    2. Goodman and Gilman or Dipiro for Therapeutics. There're both good.
    3. I don't like Lippencott, because it leaves out important adverse reactions (especially parenternals and IV).
    4. Specifically for parenternals, Trissels is by far the best one.

    In the ward:
    1. ("Chinese-like") I think you're refering to Lexi Drug Information. It's probably the best.
    2. It may also be wise to get Washington Manual.
     
  7. gatormed

    gatormed Member
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    Katzung was good as a reference but you aren't going to sit down and read through Katzung.

    Lippincott, Lippincott, Lippincott was right.
     
  8. Dr. Dr.

    Dr. Dr. New Member

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    I am an MSIV, and think there were a lot of misdirected responses.

    1. Goodman and Gilman's or anything more detailed is far more detailed than any text you will need. You will never need a reference book of that magnitude as a physician, so purchasing such a text is a grotesque waste of $. Furthermore, there are several online pharmacopeias that are updated often, and cost just as much or less.

    2. Lippincott's is a "board review book," and in contrast to Goodman and Gilman's lacks quite a bit of useful/important detail. I think Lippincott's is useful for it's straight-forward explanations, and its visual style of learning (if that suits you). However, I found that often my class notes disagreed with some of the information in Lippincott's, and Lippincott's didn't have the latest information on many drugs (or info on new drugs). At our school, we are provided with notes directly from the professors and those notes become our "textbook," and trump the information in any other source.

    3. Katzung and Lange are probably more "standard" medical school pharmacology textbooks. They are the "compromise" between Goodman and Gilman's and Lippincott's. Thus, they are quite useful since they provide added detail when you need it, but don't go overboard like the strict pharm texts. However, there will ALWAYS be information that isn't in these books, as pharm is a rapidly progressing science (for example, GPIIbIIIa inhibitors are everywhere now, but wouldn't have been mentioned 5 years ago). I think purchasing a text for reference is unwise until you plan on going into practice. I would recommend using your library's copy for any reference you need, and relying on your class notes, if you have them. Reading your library texts first will also give you a chance to see what you like before you buy anything.
     
  9. Dr. Dr.

    Dr. Dr. New Member

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    I am an MSIV, and think there were a lot of misdirected responses.

    1. Goodman and Gilman's or anything more detailed is far more detailed than any text you will need. You will never need a reference book of that magnitude as a physician, so purchasing such a text is a grotesque waste of $. Furthermore, there are several online pharmacopeias that are updated often, and cost just as much or less.

    2. Lippincott's is a "board review book," and in contrast to Goodman and Gilman's lacks quite a bit of useful/important detail. I think Lippincott's is useful for it's straight-forward explanations, and its visual style of learning (if that suits you). However, I found that often my class notes disagreed with some of the information in Lippincott's, and Lippincott's didn't have the latest information on many drugs (or info on new drugs). At our school, we are provided with notes directly from the professors and those notes become our "textbook," and trump the information in any other source.

    3. Katzung and Lange are probably more "standard" medical school pharmacology textbooks. They are the "compromise" between Goodman and Gilman's and Lippincott's. Thus, they are quite useful since they provide added detail when you need it, but don't go overboard like the strict pharm texts. However, there will ALWAYS be information that isn't in these books, as pharm is a rapidly progressing science (for example, GPIIbIIIa inhibitors are everywhere now, but wouldn't have been mentioned 5 years ago). I think purchasing a text for reference is unwise until you plan on going into practice. I would recommend using your library's copy for any reference you need, and relying on your class notes, if you have them. Reading your library texts first will also give you a chance to see what you like before you buy anything.
     
  10. Fix-it-Man

    Fix-it-Man Member
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    I agree with Dr. Dr. Use your class notes for Pharm.
    I don't know who recommended Goodman & Gilman's. If you're going to sit down and read that you might as well sit down and read Harrison's Internal Medicine cover to cover and in your spare time do a comparative reading of the Bible and the Torah or memorize your local phonebook's most current print to the year before or........
     

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