BNSN

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The answer, I am well aware, is Michigan. Depression Research Center, Huda Akil, etc.

But, I am a total ***** and missed Michigan's MSTP deadline (October 15??? So early) along with a few others (Cornell, Pitt, JHU). Anyways, I am applying straight MD to those places now in the hope that if I get in I can apply to the MSTP as an internal applicant.

But, ignoring Michigan and the other three, what are the best depression research schools? I have interviews at UTSW and UAB lined up and am waiting to here from several other places, including UNC and UVA. UTSW and UNC are psychiatry powerhouses. UAB and UVA are not at that level, but UAB has lots of new resources in the neurosciences.

So, any opinions about the schools I've listed?

In general, what's the best place for depression?
 

sluox

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Michigan is not really even among the top places for mood disorder research.

You should maybe take a look at the psychiatry forum. Also US news for top hospitals for psychiatry.


The answer, I am well aware, is Michigan. Depression Research Center, Huda Akil, etc.

But, I am a total ***** and missed Michigan's MSTP deadline (October 15??? So early) along with a few others (Cornell, Pitt, JHU). Anyways, I am applying straight MD to those places now in the hope that if I get in I can apply to the MSTP as an internal applicant.

But, ignoring Michigan and the other three, what are the best depression research schools? I have interviews at UTSW and UAB lined up and am waiting to here from several other places, including UNC and UVA. UTSW and UNC are psychiatry powerhouses. UAB and UVA are not at that level, but UAB has lots of new resources in the neurosciences.

So, any opinions about the schools I've listed?

In general, what's the best place for depression?
 

BNSN

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Thanks, Slulox. My impression, however, is that in the specific field I want to work in (stress, depression, HPA axis dysfunction) is that Michigan is the best.

Am I wrong on that as well? Thanks.
 
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JHopRevisit

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Don't know what place is the "best," but I would be more concerned with looking for places that encourage MD-PhDs in "non-traditional" fields (and at this point psychiatry is only slightly non-traditional, but it's not neurology either), and those that accept a large number of internal transfers.

The second point is very important if you're serious about the MD-PhD, I believe if you do a forum search you can find several threads on the topic. Then again, if you're really, truly serious about the MD-PhD it might be worth it to wait another year, but I understand how difficulty and frustrating that can be, so if you apply MD only make sure you can see yourself getting "just" an MD from the school you enroll in and have a plan for pursuing research if that is your passion.

Edit - additional note: Another disadvantage of an MD-only application is that you will not be able to meet with many researchers during interviews. However, once you are accepted MD-only you can ask to meet with people during that school's second look weekend or ask upperclassmen about which psychiatrists they know/have worked with, this is a much better way of finding out which place has research that suits you than relying on internet forum hearsay. Since you've already applied to a list of schools and just have to get in/choose among them, that approach should work for you.
 
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URHere

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Thanks, Slulox. My impression, however, is that in the specific field I want to work in (stress, depression, HPA axis dysfunction) is that Michigan is the best.

Am I wrong on that as well? Thanks.

I did my MS thesis on the role of early life stress on depression and HPA axis dysfunction when I was at Rochester, and there were PLENTY of researchers working in that field. Also, PIs with interests along those lines were very open to collaboration, meaning that I had access to mentors and facilities of the neurobiology and anatomy, psychoneuroimmunology, and BCS departments.

In other words, I recommend Rochester, but as JHop mentioned...you may be better off waiting until next year to apply, especially since I believe Rochester's MSTP application deadline has already passed.
 

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I'm not entirely familiar with this specific subfield, but the only research I know in this field works @ McLean Hospital (Harvard).

I dunno why or if you want to narrow your study so much so that you only want to work with a particular area of depression or a particular researcher. Depression is a VAST field. Better programs tend to have more researchers with more possibility for collaboration even if you are more interested in a specific subfield.

But again, you might want to apply next year instead, because all the truly top places have already closed their application I believe.

Thanks, Slulox. My impression, however, is that in the specific field I want to work in (stress, depression, HPA axis dysfunction) is that Michigan is the best.

Am I wrong on that as well? Thanks.
 

BNSN

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Thank you for the input. I appreciate it.

Don't know what place is the "best," but I would be more concerned with looking for places that encourage MD-PhDs in "non-traditional" fields (and at this point psychiatry is only slightly non-traditional, but it's not neurology either), and those that accept a large number of internal transfers.

The second point is very important if you're serious about the MD-PhD, I believe if you do a forum search you can find several threads on the topic. Then again, if you're really, truly serious about the MD-PhD it might be worth it to wait another year, but I understand how difficulty and frustrating that can be, so if you apply MD only make sure you can see yourself getting "just" an MD from the school you enroll in and have a plan for pursuing research if that is your passion.

The idea of applying next year is one I have considered. However, I have in fact only missed a few deadline for top schools MD/PhD (Cornell, Michigan, JHU) and even for those schools I met their MD deadline. I have met Yale, UPenn, Columbia, Stanford, Vandy, Emory, Wash U, U Wash, etc...so I do not feel that waiting one year would be worth it.

As for the idea of non-trad, I have actually seen LOTS of psych MD PhDs. It seems to be one of the most common paths for MD-PhDs, at least from the small anecdotal evidence I have seen in my work as an undergraduate.

I did my MS thesis on the role of early life stress on depression and HPA axis dysfunction when I was at Rochester, and there were PLENTY of researchers working in that field. Also, PIs with interests along those lines were very open to collaboration, meaning that I had access to mentors and facilities of the neurobiology and anatomy, psychoneuroimmunology, and BCS departments.

In other words, I recommend Rochester, but as JHop mentioned...you may be better off waiting until next year to apply, especially since I believe Rochester's MSTP application deadline has already passed.

I am glad to hear Rochester is a good place. My application was on time there and is complete and under review!

I'm not entirely familiar with this specific subfield, but the only research I know in this field works @ McLean Hospital (Harvard).

I dunno why or if you want to narrow your study so much so that you only want to work with a particular area of depression or a particular researcher. Depression is a VAST field. Better programs tend to have more researchers with more possibility for collaboration even if you are more interested in a specific subfield.

But again, you might want to apply next year instead, because all the truly top places have already closed their application I believe.

Thank you for the input. McLean is amazing, of course, and it would be wonderful to do a residency there.

The second point you make is one that many older, wiser people have told me. I will definitely make sure that I don't close any doors.

As for missing deadlines, I have actually only missed JHU, Michigan, and Cornell. I also missed Harvard but, realistically, I had no shot at getting in so it is not a real loss. Thank you again for the input.
 

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If you want to research depression, come by my lab and interview the post-docs and graduate students.
 

BNSN

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If you want to research depression, come by my lab and interview the post-docs and graduate students.

Haha. This does not inspire me to want to continue my path towards graduate school :)

Cheer up :) You'll all be done soon.
 

QofQuimica

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Edit - additional note: Another disadvantage of an MD-only application is that you will not be able to meet with many researchers during interviews. However, once you are accepted MD-only you can ask to meet with people during that school's second look weekend or ask upperclassmen about which psychiatrists they know/have worked with, this is a much better way of finding out which place has research that suits you than relying on internet forum hearsay. Since you've already applied to a list of schools and just have to get in/choose among them, that approach should work for you.
Actually, you can, but you'll need to plan ahead.

OP, most MD-only interview days have at least an hour or two of down time; if not, you can always stay an extra half-day (e.g., come in the morning before instead of the evening before) to meet with researchers. I contacted researchers in advance of every interview (for MD-only, since I already have a PhD), and met with a few of them at every med school I visited. The researchers were always happy to meet with me if they were available. In fact, at one school, one of the researchers I wanted to meet was my interviewer, and he spent most of our allotted time giving me a tour of his lab!

Best of luck with your interviews. :)
 

JHopRevisit

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OP, most MD-only interview days have at least an hour or two of down time; if not, you can always stay an extra half-day (e.g., come in the morning before instead of the evening before) to meet with researchers.

You don't think he/she would be best suited waiting until revisit weekends? Assuming you were planning on going to second looks anyway, you can limit the number of times you have to stay extra days to only the schools that you're interested in, and can avoid asking for special accommodations from MD-only admissions offices, who in my experience tend to be less friendly than their MD-PhD counterparts. But I don't mean to belabor the point, you'll be fine either way. Just make sure you talk to some people at each school you're interesting in.
 

QofQuimica

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You don't think he/she would be best suited waiting until revisit weekends? Assuming you were planning on going to second looks anyway, you can limit the number of times you have to stay extra days to only the schools that you're interested in, and can avoid asking for special accommodations from MD-only admissions offices, who in my experience tend to be less friendly than their MD-PhD counterparts. But I don't mean to belabor the point, you'll be fine either way. Just make sure you talk to some people at each school you're interesting in.
I guess it depends on how big a factor this is going to be in the decision-making process. I would think that for the OP, who wants to get into a PhD program, it would be important enough to be worth his/her making the extra effort. For me, finding a good mentor was one of the more important things I wanted in my future med school. I was accepted to twelve schools all over the South, Northeast, and Midwest. There's no way I was going to visit even half of them a second time to meet with researchers!

My experience was that the med schools ranged from being neutral about it (i.e., they told me I could meet with researchers, but setting up the meetings was my responsibility), to going far out of their way to help me by including meetings with researchers whom I had selected into my interview day schedule. I would talk to the admissions offices about meeting with researchers while setting up my interviews. No school out of 17 interviews that I attended told me that I couldn't meet with one or two researchers during my interview visit. I'm really not sure how they could have been any friendlier or more accomodating to me, to be honest. :)
 
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