Best post-bac programs to consider to boost my chances of getting accepted? (3.45 cGPA, 3.3 sGPA)

PAtoPharm

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I graduated several years ago with a B.S. in Biology and completed two semesters of an anesthesiology PA program (technically an AA program) but wasn't able to continue beyond the second semester in the AA program due to failing a lab course. After failing the lab course, my overall GPA (taking into account both undergraduate & graduate courses) is a 3.45, and my sGPA is a 3.3. I haven't taken the DAT yet. Dental school was my original plan back when I was an undergraduate student, and I regret not applying to dental schools back because I wanted to take the "shorter" pathway.

I know that at this point, I would be a very weak applicant to dental schools, but I want to pursue my original goal of becoming a dentist. I know that my application isn't very competitive as it stands now, but I'm willing to do whatever it takes to get accepted to dental school, and I don't care how long it takes me at this point.

So having said that, I figured that the best strategy to take to try and "redeem" myself as a dental school applicant would be to enroll in and complete a post-bac program. I understand that there are many medical schools out there that offer post-bac programs (whereby graduates of the post-bac program are guaranteed admission to the MD/DO program if they complete the post-bac with a certain minimum GPA), but I'm having a hard time finding similar programs offered by dental schools. Based on what I've found via Google searching, it seems like most of the post-bac programs out there are intended for applicants who have never taken biology, chemistry, physics, etc. and are trying to establish a pre-dental course history.

So having said that, does anyone have any recommendations on post-bac programs offered by dental schools that would be advisable for someone in my situation to pursue? Like I said, I know I'm a terribly uncompetitive applicant and I'm bracing for the "you should just choose another career" posts, but I'm willing to do whatever it takes to get accepted to dental school (preferably one in the southeast).

Thanks in advance

EDIT: I miscalculated my GPAs -- my cGPA is actually a 3.419, and my sGPA is probably closer to 3.2.
 
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DC206R

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GPA isn't terrible at all. No DAT yet and no idea what your EC's are so can't say how competitive your app will be. Side note: PAtoPharm username wanting to be a dentist?
 
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plusalpha

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I graduated several years ago with a B.S. in Biology and completed two semesters of an anesthesiology PA program (technically an AA program) but wasn't able to continue beyond the second semester in the AA program due to failing a lab course. After failing the lab course, my overall GPA (taking into account both undergraduate & graduate courses) is a 3.45, and my sGPA is a 3.3. I haven't taken the DAT yet. Dental school was my original plan back when I was an undergraduate student, and I regret not applying to dental schools back because I wanted to take the "shorter" pathway.

I know that at this point, I would be a very weak applicant to dental schools, but I want to pursue my original goal of becoming a dentist. I know that my application isn't very competitive as it stands now, but I'm willing to do whatever it takes to get accepted to dental school, and I don't care how long it takes me at this point.

So having said that, I figured that the best strategy to take to try and "redeem" myself as a dental school applicant would be to enroll in and complete a post-bac program. I understand that there are many medical schools out there that offer post-bac programs (whereby graduates of the post-bac program are guaranteed admission to the MD/DO program if they complete the post-bac with a certain minimum GPA), but I'm having a hard time finding similar programs offered by dental schools. Based on what I've found via Google searching, it seems like most of the post-bac programs out there are intended for applicants who have never taken biology, chemistry, physics, etc. and are trying to establish a pre-dental course history.

So having said that, does anyone have any recommendations on post-bac programs offered by dental schools that would be advisable for someone in my situation to pursue? Like I said, I know I'm a terribly uncompetitive applicant and I'm bracing for the "you should just choose another career" posts, but I'm willing to do whatever it takes to get accepted to dental school (preferably one in the southeast).

Thanks in advance
What didn't you like about the pharmacy and DO route?
 

DMDDDSHopeful

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I graduated several years ago with a B.S. in Biology and completed two semesters of an anesthesiology PA program (technically an AA program) but wasn't able to continue beyond the second semester in the AA program due to failing a lab course. After failing the lab course, my overall GPA (taking into account both undergraduate & graduate courses) is a 3.45, and my sGPA is a 3.3. I haven't taken the DAT yet. Dental school was my original plan back when I was an undergraduate student, and I regret not applying to dental schools back because I wanted to take the "shorter" pathway.

I know that at this point, I would be a very weak applicant to dental schools, but I want to pursue my original goal of becoming a dentist. I know that my application isn't very competitive as it stands now, but I'm willing to do whatever it takes to get accepted to dental school, and I don't care how long it takes me at this point.

So having said that, I figured that the best strategy to take to try and "redeem" myself as a dental school applicant would be to enroll in and complete a post-bac program. I understand that there are many medical schools out there that offer post-bac programs (whereby graduates of the post-bac program are guaranteed admission to the MD/DO program if they complete the post-bac with a certain minimum GPA), but I'm having a hard time finding similar programs offered by dental schools. Based on what I've found via Google searching, it seems like most of the post-bac programs out there are intended for applicants who have never taken biology, chemistry, physics, etc. and are trying to establish a pre-dental course history.

So having said that, does anyone have any recommendations on post-bac programs offered by dental schools that would be advisable for someone in my situation to pursue? Like I said, I know I'm a terribly uncompetitive applicant and I'm bracing for the "you should just choose another career" posts, but I'm willing to do whatever it takes to get accepted to dental school (preferably one in the southeast).

Thanks in advance
Odd choice in your username. Your GPA is fine. Take the DAT and do well. Make sure to talk about your journey and why you chose dentistry in your statement. People on here will help you. Do an informal postbacc that leads to a Masters if you can. Then if you can't get in, there are SMG programs that partner with dental schools. VCU is a school that offers a 0.5D where they take applicants that are like you and give them a mini path to dental. Look at their website.

And don't worry about doing other careers or pursuing other pathways before dentistry. Plenty of people do that. Several people here have many other degrees or come from other fields and I've spoken to admission reps who have told me they have students applying that are MDs, DOs, and PhDs. Does it happen as much as traditional students? No. But it happens.
 

LuckBloodandSweat

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We've got really similar GPAs. Don't jump the gun on boosting your grades. Focus on your DAT and get some shadowing/volunteering/assisting imo. I'll let you know if I get rejected from everything or not xDD
 

redhotchiligochu

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Your cGPA and sGPA is higher than mine and I already have one interview invite. Whether I get multiple interviews or accepted into dental school post-interview is another story.

Like many people above mentioned, your GPA is not "bad," maybe 0.1 points below the average dental school matriculation GPA. Your GPA isn't low enough where you will get autorejected, maybe with the exception of Harvard or Columbia. Get as much dental shadowing experience as you can. Post-bac is not necessary unless if you feel the need to review your BCP coursework. Check with your local state college and see if they have some sort of postbac or 1 year masters program.

IMO what matters most at this point is your DAT. Shoot for 20+ AA. Lastly, be prepared to explain yourself if you mention in your app that you used to be pre-PA and pre-pharm.
 

fayevalentine

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Your GPA is not bad at all, but if according to your most recent postings it is obvious you have no idea what you want to do in life. You were accepted to pharmacy school and you're not going, after you failed out of a different professional school program? Adcoms wants students who are dedicated and interested in dentistry. Money is not a good enough reason on it's own to want to be part of this field.

You may think dentistry is just ho-hum and not remotely stressful, but have you ever actually been in the room during a complicated procedure? Sure, it's nowhere near the level of stress that a surgeon has, but it's not all fun and games. I see you quit or are quitting Pharm school because you've never worked a pharmacy job and don't know if you want to do retail... have you ever shadowed a dentist before? You're going to be looking in people's disgusting mouths, doing procedures that could have been avoided had the patient listened to your recommendations at previous appointments, while the patient is pissed off and arguing with you because they feel like now you're ripping them off (a lot of patients are actually quite lovely, but I have seen these people before and they are NOT fun). I can promise you will see these types of patients in chain dentistry, and probably some in private practice as well. Do you have what it takes to own and run a practice if you don't want to get into a chain and can't find a job with another private dentist? I'm not claiming you don't, but really ask yourself that question and be honest with yourself. You say you won't move, so you need to be willing to take whatever job you can get in your area out of DS. You should really shadow in both a private office and a chain.

I think before you spend any time in a post-bach, you need to take some time and figure out what you want out of your career, and if you'd be a good fit. Do you REALLY love the field of dentistry? If you do, that's great and I really don't think need a post-bach. What you do need are strong, solid reasons behind all the career switching you've been doing. Also, focus of your DAT and destroy it (I'm a hypocrite here, I need to be studying right now).

Edit: I took the time to read your last thread completely. Changed the tune of my post a little.
 
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redhotchiligochu

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Your GPA is not bad at all, but if according to your most recent postings it is obvious you have no idea what you want to do in life. You were accepted to pharmacy school and you're not going, after you either failed out of a different professional school program? Adcoms wants students who are dedicated and interested in dentistry. Money is not a good enough reason on it's own to want to be part of this field.

You may think dentistry is just ho-hum and not remotely stressful, but have you ever actually been in the room during a complicated procedure? Sure, it's nowhere near the level of stress that a surgeon has, but it's not all fun and games. I see you quit or are quitting Pharm school because you've never worked a pharmacy job and don't know if you want to do retail... have you ever shadowed a dentist before? You're going to be looking in people's disgusting mouths, doing procedures that could have been avoided had the patient listened to your recommendations at previous appointments, while the patient is pissed off and arguing with you because they feel like now you're ripping them off (a lot of patients are actually quiet lovely, but I have seen these people before and they are NOT fun). I can promise you will see these types of patients in chain dentistry, and probably some in private practice as well. Do you have what it takes to own and run a practice if you don't want to get into a chain and can't find a job with another private dentist? I'm not claiming you don't, but really ask yourself that question and be honest with yourself. You say you won't move, so you need to be willing to take whatever job you can get in your area out of DS. You should really shadow in both a private office and a chain.

I think before you spend any time in a post-bach, you need to take some time and figure out what you want out of your career, and if you'd be a good fit. Do you REALLY love the field of dentistry? If you do, that's great and I really don't think need a post-bach. What you do need are strong, solid reasons behind all the career switching you've been doing. Also, focus of your DAT and destroy it (I'm a hypocrite here, I need to be studying right now).

Edit: I took the time to read your last thread completely. Changed the tune of my post a little.
Spot on. Dentistry is no cakewalk. Sure it's rated at one of the top 5 "best" professions but it's also the 2nd most suicidal (literally) profession. D-school may be "easier" to get into than med school, but the profession itself is much more stressful.
 

Charles_Darwin

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Your GPA is not bad at all, but if according to your most recent postings it is obvious you have no idea what you want to do in life. You were accepted to pharmacy school and you're not going, after you failed out of a different professional school program? Adcoms wants students who are dedicated and interested in dentistry. Money is not a good enough reason on it's own to want to be part of this field.

You may think dentistry is just ho-hum and not remotely stressful, but have you ever actually been in the room during a complicated procedure? Sure, it's nowhere near the level of stress that a surgeon has, but it's not all fun and games. I see you quit or are quitting Pharm school because you've never worked a pharmacy job and don't know if you want to do retail... have you ever shadowed a dentist before? You're going to be looking in people's disgusting mouths, doing procedures that could have been avoided had the patient listened to your recommendations at previous appointments, while the patient is pissed off and arguing with you because they feel like now you're ripping them off (a lot of patients are actually quite lovely, but I have seen these people before and they are NOT fun). I can promise you will see these types of patients in chain dentistry, and probably some in private practice as well. Do you have what it takes to own and run a practice if you don't want to get into a chain and can't find a job with another private dentist? I'm not claiming you don't, but really ask yourself that question and be honest with yourself. You say you won't move, so you need to be willing to take whatever job you can get in your area out of DS. You should really shadow in both a private office and a chain.

I think before you spend any time in a post-bach, you need to take some time and figure out what you want out of your career, and if you'd be a good fit. Do you REALLY love the field of dentistry? If you do, that's great and I really don't think need a post-bach. What you do need are strong, solid reasons behind all the career switching you've been doing. Also, focus of your DAT and destroy it (I'm a hypocrite here, I need to be studying right now).

Edit: I took the time to read your last thread completely. Changed the tune of my post a little.
Perfectly said! OP, no one wants to burst your bubble but you need to make sure this is something you want. Money should not be the factor! You did say that this was your original goal so hopefully you genuinely want this. In that case, a post-bac isn't necessary at all. As long as your ECs are fine, slay the DAT and you shouldn't have any trouble netting some acceptances. Good luck!
 
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PAtoPharm

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First of all, thanks to everyone who responded to my original post; when I have more time later tonight, I'll respond to each poster individually.

It seems like several people have commented on my history of switching "back-and-forth" between healthcare professions, so I'll try to explain that a bit -- basically, throughout college, I was pre-dental and had aspirations of becoming an orthodontist (I had braces all throughout highschool and part of college); however, towards the end of my B.S. degree, I began to feel apprehensive about spending so much time in school/residency. I had also heard about how ultra-competitive it was to get accepted to orthodontics residencies. So I ended up attempting to pursue other health professions programs that don't take as much time to complete (e.g., anesthesia PA school), but like I said in my original post, I ended up failing a lab course and wasn't able to continue with the AA program (although I wasn't formally dismissed).

Ironically, I'm as old (or older) than I'd have been if I had just followed-through with the plan to attend dental school followed by residency, and now I realize that I should have simply stuck with my original plan. I guess you could say I learned a tough lesson about the consequences of not wanting (for the wrong reasons) to put in the time to achieve a worthy goal. Also, it definitely seems to be a case of the saying "the first thing you had in mind was probably the best choice." I know this isn't always the case, but I really think it applies here.

I think I mentioned in my original post that I'm from the southeast, and to be more specific, I'm from GA. Unfortunately, GA only has one dental school (MCG), and I understand that last year, the average matriculant had a 3.6 GPA. So having said that, do you guys think that I basically have no shot of getting accepted to MCG with a 3.45? I'm definitely planning on doing exceptionally well on the DAT, but does anyone know if MCG utilizes a strict cut-off system when it comes to granting interview offers (I.e., they won't interview anyone who has less than a 3.XX GPA)? The thing is, I would really love to be able to stay in the southeast, but it seems like most of the schools throughout the south only accept in-state students, so if I don't get accepted to MCG, it looks like I'd have no choice but to attend one of the expensive private schools outside of the south.

Also, in general, is it unrealistic to go to dental school with the absolute goal of attending residency afterwards? I remember that 8-10 years ago, it was known that you basically had to be in the top 5% of the class in order to be competitive for orthodontics, but I'm not sure if that's still the case or not. However, I also realize that I'll receive exposure to various specialties as a dental student, so I'm also leaving the door open to applying to other specialties that I might develop an interest for along the way. In that case, are all the other specialties so competitive that you essentially have to be in the top 4-5% of the class to be competitive for them?

The reason I ask is because, even though I'm capable of studying and being a good student at the graduate level, I just don't think I'm top-5%-of-the-class "material" when it comes to grad-level health professions courses. For example, when I was in AA school, I did pretty well in most of the classes I took other than lab -- during a typical semester, I'd make 1 or 2 A's, a handful of A-'s, and maybe a couple B's/B-'s. So in other words, I studied a LOT and felt like I was a pretty strong student, but those obviously aren't the kinds of grades that would put someone in the top 5% of the class. So assuming I attend and finish dental school with a GPA in the 3.5-3.6 range, would this make me competitive enough to gain admission to the various specialty residencies (again, not necessarily ortho)?

Thanks again for your time & advice!
 

redhotchiligochu

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First of all, thanks to everyone who responded to my original post; when I have more time later tonight, I'll respond to each poster individually.

It seems like several people have commented on my history of switching "back-and-forth" between healthcare professions, so I'll try to explain that a bit -- basically, throughout college, I was pre-dental and had aspirations of becoming an orthodontist (I had braces all throughout highschool and part of college); however, towards the end of my B.S. degree, I began to feel apprehensive about spending so much time in school/residency. I had also heard about how ultra-competitive it was to get accepted to orthodontics residencies. So I ended up attempting to pursue other health professions programs that don't take as much time to complete (e.g., anesthesia PA school), but like I said in my original post, I ended up failing a lab course and wasn't able to continue with the AA program (although I wasn't formally dismissed).

Ironically, I'm as old (or older) than I'd have been if I had just followed-through with the plan to attend dental school followed by residency, and now I realize that I should have simply stuck with my original plan. I guess you could say I learned a tough lesson about the consequences of not wanting (for the wrong reasons) to put in the time to achieve a worthy goal. Also, it definitely seems to be a case of the saying "the first thing you had in mind was probably the best choice." I know this isn't always the case, but I really think it applies here.

I think I mentioned in my original post that I'm from the southeast, and to be more specific, I'm from GA. Unfortunately, GA only has one dental school (MCG), and I understand that last year, the average matriculant had a 3.6 GPA. So having said that, do you guys think that I basically have no shot of getting accepted to MCG with a 3.45? I'm definitely planning on doing exceptionally well on the DAT, but does anyone know if MCG utilizes a strict cut-off system when it comes to granting interview offers (I.e., they won't interview anyone who has less than a 3.XX GPA)? The thing is, I would really love to be able to stay in the southeast, but it seems like most of the schools throughout the south only accept in-state students, so if I don't get accepted to MCG, it looks like I'd have no choice but to attend one of the expensive private schools outside of the south.

Also, in general, is it unrealistic to go to dental school with the absolute goal of attending residency afterwards? I remember that 8-10 years ago, it was known that you basically had to be in the top 5% of the class in order to be competitive for orthodontics, but I'm not sure if that's still the case or not. However, I also realize that I'll receive exposure to various specialties as a dental student, so I'm also leaving the door open to applying to other specialties that I might develop an interest for along the way. In that case, are all the other specialties so competitive that you essentially have to be in the top 4-5% of the class to be competitive for them?

The reason I ask is because, even though I'm capable of studying and being a good student at the graduate level, I just don't think I'm top-5%-of-the-class "material" when it comes to grad-level health professions courses. For example, when I was in AA school, I did pretty well in most of the classes I took other than lab -- during a typical semester, I'd make 1 or 2 A's, a handful of A-'s, and maybe a couple B's/B-'s. So in other words, I studied a LOT and felt like I was a pretty strong student, but those obviously aren't the kinds of grades that would put someone in the top 5% of the class. So assuming I attend and finish dental school with a GPA in the 3.5-3.6 range, would this make me competitive enough to gain admission to the various specialty residencies (again, not necessarily ortho)?

Thanks again for your time & advice!
As long as you discover for yourself why dentistry will be a good fit for you, you should be alright. Sometimes people don't know what they REALLY want and are "lucky" enough (or have helicopter parents who force their children to go to professional school) to start d-school when they're 21 years old but what's to say they might get a mid-life crisis when they're 52 and regret going into dentistry?

The fact that you explore other options is actually a good thing, but you need to prove to the adcoms why you're committed to dentistry now and why you chose to quit the other fields you dabbled in. I personally was in the education industry for 5 years but I have a pretty damn good answer to that IF adcoms bring it up in interviews.

Your academics is fine, but please make sure that it is something you REALLY want, because it's not like you can "switch" careers and become a plumber if you decide to quit dentistry.
 
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PAtoPharm

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As long as you discover for yourself why dentistry will be a good fit for you, you should be alright. Sometimes people don't know what they REALLY want and are "lucky" enough (or have helicopter parents who force their children to go to professional school) to start d-school when they're 21 years old but what's to say they might get a mid-life crisis when they're 52 and regret going into dentistry?

The fact that you explore other options is actually a good thing, but you need to prove to the adcoms why you're committed to dentistry now and why you chose to quit the other fields you dabbled in. I personally was in the education industry for 5 years but I have a pretty damn good answer to that IF adcoms bring it up in interviews.

Your academics is fine, but please make sure that it is something you REALLY want, because it's not like you can "switch" careers and become a plumber if you decide to quit dentistry.
Thanks for the advice; at the very least, I know I can
GPA isn't terrible at all. No DAT yet and no idea what your EC's are so can't say how competitive your app will be. Side note: PAtoPharm username wanting to be a dentist?
LOL, I know it looks strange; I made my username back when I thought I wanted to do pharmacy. I'm definitely going to study hard for the DAT, so hopefully that should help to balance out my somewhat lower-than-average GPA. I'm going to do some work on my ECs, but as they stand now: have shadowed a dentist for probably 50+ hours (going to do more), completed a formal environmental science research project that I received course credit for. completed 40+ hours of volunteering at a local nursing home, volunteered as a medical writer/editor for a local hospital for several years, volunteered on various projects for my university (editing a chemistry journal, blogging for the university). The only problem is that some of these ECs are kind of old (5+ years in some cases), so it would probably be a good idea to get more recent EC experiences to add to my app.
 
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PAtoPharm

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Odd choice in your username. Your GPA is fine. Take the DAT and do well. Make sure to talk about your journey and why you chose dentistry in your statement. People on here will help you. Do an informal postbacc that leads to a Masters if you can. Then if you can't get in, there are SMG programs that partner with dental schools. VCU is a school that offers a 0.5D where they take applicants that are like you and give them a mini path to dental. Look at their website.

And don't worry about doing other careers or pursuing other pathways before dentistry. Plenty of people do that. Several people here have many other degrees or come from other fields and I've spoken to admission reps who have told me they have students applying that are MDs, DOs, and PhDs. Does it happen as much as traditional students? No. But it happens.
Thanks for the advice. I did some research on the VCU 0.5D program, but just out of curiosity, do you know of any other dental schools that offer similar SMG programs? For some reason, I haven't been able to find any on Google (all the ones I've come across so far are for people who want to go to dental school but haven't taken the pre-requisites).
 
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PAtoPharm

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We've got really similar GPAs. Don't jump the gun on boosting your grades. Focus on your DAT and get some shadowing/volunteering/assisting imo. I'll let you know if I get rejected from everything or not xDD
Good luck with your applications! Have you received any interview invitations already? Any chance you applied to MCG?
 
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PAtoPharm

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Your cGPA and sGPA is higher than mine and I already have one interview invite. Whether I get multiple interviews or accepted into dental school post-interview is another story.

Like many people above mentioned, your GPA is not "bad," maybe 0.1 points below the average dental school matriculation GPA. Your GPA isn't low enough where you will get autorejected, maybe with the exception of Harvard or Columbia. Get as much dental shadowing experience as you can. Post-bac is not necessary unless if you feel the need to review your BCP coursework. Check with your local state college and see if they have some sort of postbac or 1 year masters program.

IMO what matters most at this point is your DAT. Shoot for 20+ AA. Lastly, be prepared to explain yourself if you mention in your app that you used to be pre-PA and pre-pharm.
Congratulations on your interview invitation and thanks for the advice. The problem (for me) is that even though my GPA isn't that low by most dental schools' standards, my state dental school (MCG) seems to have higher GPA stats than most schools (3.6 cGPA -- not sure about sGPA), so I'd be a fairly uncompetitive applicant there. Also, I don't know how true this is, but I've heard that they've been making a push over the last few years to accept more underrepresented/disadvantaged/minority applicants, so me being a white male applicant probably doesn't help my case. This is one reason I considered doing a post-bac/SMG to raise my GPA. Definitely going to do whatever it takes to blow the DAT out of the water. BTW, I actually was enrolled in an anesthesiology PA program (not just a pre-PA college student), so the fact that I basically failed out of the program might kill my chances altogether at more than a few schools.
 
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PAtoPharm

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Your GPA is not bad at all, but if according to your most recent postings it is obvious you have no idea what you want to do in life. You were accepted to pharmacy school and you're not going, after you failed out of a different professional school program? Adcoms wants students who are dedicated and interested in dentistry. Money is not a good enough reason on it's own to want to be part of this field.

You may think dentistry is just ho-hum and not remotely stressful, but have you ever actually been in the room during a complicated procedure? Sure, it's nowhere near the level of stress that a surgeon has, but it's not all fun and games. I see you quit or are quitting Pharm school because you've never worked a pharmacy job and don't know if you want to do retail... have you ever shadowed a dentist before? You're going to be looking in people's disgusting mouths, doing procedures that could have been avoided had the patient listened to your recommendations at previous appointments, while the patient is pissed off and arguing with you because they feel like now you're ripping them off (a lot of patients are actually quite lovely, but I have seen these people before and they are NOT fun). I can promise you will see these types of patients in chain dentistry, and probably some in private practice as well. Do you have what it takes to own and run a practice if you don't want to get into a chain and can't find a job with another private dentist? I'm not claiming you don't, but really ask yourself that question and be honest with yourself. You say you won't move, so you need to be willing to take whatever job you can get in your area out of DS. You should really shadow in both a private office and a chain.

I think before you spend any time in a post-bach, you need to take some time and figure out what you want out of your career, and if you'd be a good fit. Do you REALLY love the field of dentistry? If you do, that's great and I really don't think need a post-bach. What you do need are strong, solid reasons behind all the career switching you've been doing. Also, focus of your DAT and destroy it (I'm a hypocrite here, I need to be studying right now).

Edit: I took the time to read your last thread completely. Changed the tune of my post a little.
I don't know much about chain dentistry, so I can't really answer your questions regarding that, but I guess all healthcare fields have become somewhat less "cushy" over the last few years (although it sounds like dentists are, for the most part, in a relatively better position as compared to most physicians). The thing is, I was originally pre-dental when I started college but made the ill-fated decision to pursue other careers because I didn't want to spend "so much time" in school. Obviously, I realize that decision was mistake now; I should have stayed the course and saw through to my goal of going to dental school. What's ironic is that I'm now older (or at least just as old) as I would've been if I had just gone to dental school in the first place, so at this point, I'm not worried about how long it will take me to get through school (not married & no kids, so no real reason to be), and so I just want to follow the pathway I should have followed in the first place.

To be honest, my original plan was to go to dental school and then complete an orthodontics residency, but one of the reasons (among others) I shied away from pursuing this goal was because I'd heard about how difficult it is to get accepted to an ortho residency (must be in top 5% of the class, etc.). If I do end up attending dental school, I think I definitely want to pursue some sort of residency, although I would let my experiences in dental school help guide me in regards to choosing which type of residency I'd like to pursue. Generally speaking, though, is it unrealistic to attend dental school with the expectation of being able to complete a residency (as long as someone doesn't mind taking on $150k-$200k more debt to complete the residency)?

Thanks
 
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PAtoPharm

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Your GPA is good. Do not spend an excessive amount of money trying to boost it up. Kill the DAT.
Thanks; am trying to be competitive for MCG, but I don't know if it's possible considering how high their average accepted GPA is, so a super-high DAT score might not be enough to make up for the lower-than-average GPA.
 

LuckBloodandSweat

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Thanks; am trying to be competitive for MCG, but I don't know if it's possible considering how high their average accepted GPA is, so a super-high DAT score might not be enough to make up for the lower-than-average GPA.
Georgia? I applied there but I doubt I'd get in. No interviews at all yet. My new DAT hasn't been uploaded to AADSAS yet and hopefully all my recs are in at any day now. Hoping to see some changes in another week or two.
 
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PAtoPharm

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Georgia? I applied there but I doubt I'd get in. No interviews at all yet. My new DAT hasn't been uploaded to AADSAS yet and hopefully all my recs are in at any day now. Hoping to see some changes in another week or two.
Well, good luck with receiving interview offers over the next few weeks. Yeah, I think they're calling MCG a new name (Augusta College or something), but it seems like they re-name it every few years anyways. Just out of curiosity, can I ask how long ago it was when you applied? Also, are you from GA, if you don't mind me asking?
 

LuckBloodandSweat

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No I'm not from GA. I'm from NY. I'm a paranoid predent who has applied to over 20 schools because of my subpar stats and I was afraid I wouldn't get a very high DAT score the 2nd time (thankfully I'm satisfied with my retake) so I really wanted my best shot at getting in this cycle. I've applied to most of the NY schools, BU, Tufts, UMD, NOVA, etc just to list more lol. Too many to list right here.
 
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PAtoPharm

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No I'm not from GA. I'm from NY. I'm a paranoid predent who has applied to over 20 schools because of my subpar stats and I was afraid I wouldn't get a very high DAT score the 2nd time (thankfully I'm satisfied with my retake) so I really wanted my best shot at getting in this cycle. I've applied to most of the NY schools, BU, Tufts, UMD, NOVA, etc just to list more lol. Too many to list right here.
Are the schools in the northeast/NY considered easier to get accepted to? The reason I ask is because, even though I definitely want to get accepted *somewhere*, I've never really been much of a "great north" person. For sub-par applicants like myself, are the northeastern schools my most realistic options? Because if that's the case, then I honestly think I'd rather spend a year or two completing a local master's degree if I pretty much have no alternative but to attend one of the schools up north.
 
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PAtoPharm

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Shoot, I just realize I made a miscalculation with my GPA.... it's actually just a 3.419. :/ With this being the case, is a post-bac pretty much a necessity now?
 

LuckBloodandSweat

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Shoot, I just realize I made a miscalculation with my GPA.... it's actually just a 3.419. :/ With this being the case, is a post-bac pretty much a necessity now?
Lol that's not a huge difference. Well NYU/BU/Tufts are larger and kinda expensive but I'd rather go there then miss out on a year. I hope to get into some schools that aren't overly pricey but it all depends on my luck
 
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honestly i think your stats are good enough already. there is no need to waste money on any postbacc. just apply early and i'm sure you will get some interview.