403710

Guest
5+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
717
169
Brooklyn, NY
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Hello all,

I'm starting my MCAT studying. I've taken the DAT, which encompasses all but physics, and don't remember anything from my undergrad Physics courses.

What's the best tool or method to learn physics from scratch? Would you all recommend Chad's videos as a first step? I need a comprehensive review, preferably through online videos since I learn a lot quicker through lecture than textbook. But if you all think there's a book out there that's far superior to any videos, let me know!

Thanks all!

I'll be starting the Physics section of my Barron's MCAT book while you all gimme some feedback.
 
Sep 18, 2012
301
11
Status
Pre-Medical
Hello all,

I'm starting my MCAT studying. I've taken the DAT, which encompasses all but physics, and don't remember anything from my undergrad Physics courses.

What's the best tool or method to learn physics from scratch? Would you all recommend Chad's videos as a first step? I need a comprehensive review, preferably through online videos since I learn a lot quicker through lecture than textbook. But if you all think there's a book out there that's far superior to any videos, let me know!

Thanks all!

I'll be starting the Physics section of my Barron's MCAT book while you all gimme some feedback.
Chad's pretty good, I really really like them but if you wanna save money just youtube every concept (as you go along with the textbook)
 
OP
4

403710

Guest
5+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
717
169
Brooklyn, NY
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Chad's pretty good, I really really like them but if you wanna save money just youtube every concept (as you go along with the textbook)
Which textbook are you referring to? Any in particular?
 

MrMention

5+ Year Member
Oct 2, 2012
186
65
At a Bar near you.
Status
Non-Student
Hello all,

I'm starting my MCAT studying. I've taken the DAT, which encompasses all but physics, and don't remember anything from my undergrad Physics courses.

What's the best tool or method to learn physics from scratch? Would you all recommend Chad's videos as a first step? I need a comprehensive review, preferably through online videos since I learn a lot quicker through lecture than textbook. But if you all think there's a book out there that's far superior to any videos, let me know!

Thanks all!

I'll be starting the Physics section of my Barron's MCAT book while you all gimme some feedback.

Although books are not your preferred choice, I would replace the Barron's book with both Berkeley Review physics and Nova's physics. I have heard good thinks about Chad's videos also. Good luck.
 

1TB4RKSB4CK

wussup doge
5+ Year Member
May 6, 2010
2,893
125
Miami
Status
Pre-Medical
I didn't take physics 2 yet so I have been supplementing with the Giancoli physics textbook. If you have taken physics though I would agree with daleader and just YouTube the concepts.
 
Sep 18, 2012
301
11
Status
Pre-Medical
I didn't take physics 2 yet so I have been supplementing with the Giancoli physics textbook. If you have taken physics though I would agree with daleader and just YouTube the concepts.
I've been self studying pretty much for all the concepts, Physics II, Organic I and Organic II, and Biology II - I didn't have any of them in my undergrad .... I know its different person to person but I can do a pretty good job at self-learning by just watching videos and review books...

Although there are a LOT of good comments about TBR, I think TPR does a very good job at pretty much all subjects...... it helped me a lot .. definitely try them

For for all those courses, Physics II, Organic I and II, etc , that I haven't taken, I first skim through the chapter (in like 20 minutes), then watch the videos on them, and then read the chapter in 2-3 hours ...

PS. Chad does an excellent job but keep in mind that is not as complete as TBR and TPR ... but still very useful
 
  • Like
Reactions: DenTony11235
OP
4

403710

Guest
5+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
717
169
Brooklyn, NY
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I've been self studying pretty much for all the concepts, Physics II, Organic I and Organic II, and Biology II - I didn't have any of them in my undergrad .... I know its different person to person but I can do a pretty good job at self-learning by just watching videos and review books...

Although there are a LOT of good comments about TBR, I think TPR does a very good job at pretty much all subjects...... it helped me a lot .. definitely try them

For for all those courses, Physics II, Organic I and II, etc , that I haven't taken, I first skim through the chapter (in like 20 minutes), then watch the videos on them, and then read the chapter in 2-3 hours ...

PS. Chad does an excellent job but keep in mind that is not as complete as TBR and TPR ... but still very useful
Good strategy. I like it. Will try to adopt it.
 

Next Step Tutor

MCAT Guru
Sponsor
5+ Year Member
Sep 30, 2013
615
223
Tucson, AZ
nextsteptestprep.com
Status
Pre-Medical
just youtube every concept (as you go along with the textbook)
I'd suggest avoiding textbooks altogether. Instead, print out the official list of physics topics from AAMC and just go through them checklist-style. Maybe something like this:

1. Read the mcat-review.org entry on the topic
2. Read the wikipedia entry on the topic
3. Watch the relevant Khan Academy videos
4. Complete the relevant chapters in your MCAT books
5. Re-read the mcat-review.org entry on the topic
6. Re-do the practice passages in your review books

By the end of that you'll have a better understanding than even most folks who did take a class on the topic. Remember that college professors are notoriously bad teachers, and certainly aren't teaching to the MCAT. So the notion that somehow you've missed out on absolutely essential learning opportunities by not covering a topic in a college class is bupkes.
 
Sep 18, 2012
301
11
Status
Pre-Medical
I'd suggest avoiding textbooks altogether. Instead, print out the official list of physics topics from AAMC and just go through them checklist-style. Maybe something like this:

1. Read the mcat-review.org entry on the topic
2. Read the wikipedia entry on the topic
3. Watch the relevant Khan Academy videos
4. Complete the relevant chapters in your MCAT books
5. Re-read the mcat-review.org entry on the topic
6. Re-do the practice passages in your review books

By the end of that you'll have a better understanding than even most folks who did take a class on the topic. Remember that college professors are notoriously bad teachers, and certainly aren't teaching to the MCAT. So the notion that somehow you've missed out on absolutely essential learning opportunities by not covering a topic in a college class is bupkes.
Although I meant review books not textbooks, I still think looking back at your textbooks for certain topics can be useful - sometimes it doesn't hurt to know more!
 

1TB4RKSB4CK

wussup doge
5+ Year Member
May 6, 2010
2,893
125
Miami
Status
Pre-Medical
You already took Physics so you would be fine not using a textbook
However, for someone how hasn't taken Physics (Physics II in my case), it is much more beneficial to review the textbook before diving into the review books because the books are just that, a review. They will leave out elementary concepts that you were expected to know off the back from classes due to the fact that most of the companies want to make a nice and concise book that would not take up as much time to use.
 
  • Like
Reactions: docemmettbrown
OP
4

403710

Guest
5+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
717
169
Brooklyn, NY
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I'd suggest avoiding textbooks altogether. Instead, print out the official list of physics topics from AAMC and just go through them checklist-style. Maybe something like this:

1. Read the mcat-review.org entry on the topic
2. Read the wikipedia entry on the topic
3. Watch the relevant Khan Academy videos
4. Complete the relevant chapters in your MCAT books
5. Re-read the mcat-review.org entry on the topic
6. Re-do the practice passages in your review books

By the end of that you'll have a better understanding than even most folks who did take a class on the topic. Remember that college professors are notoriously bad teachers, and certainly aren't teaching to the MCAT. So the notion that somehow you've missed out on absolutely essential learning opportunities by not covering a topic in a college class is bupkes.
Very very good suggestion. Thanks for sharing. Thanks everyone for the input, I got what I came for.