Big city ENT

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by DuneHog, Mar 2, 2002.

  1. DuneHog

    DuneHog Senior Member

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    Does anyone have much experience with ENT programs in larger cities like New York or Chicago? In general, are they more or less competative than other ENT programs? What about housing subsidies for programs in New York?
     
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  3. neutropeniaboy

    neutropeniaboy Blasted ENT Attending

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by DuneHog:
    <strong>Does anyone have much experience with ENT programs in larger cities like New York or Chicago? In general, are they more or less competative than other ENT programs? What about housing subsidies for programs in New York?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">What do you mean by "competitive?" I would say ENT in general is a competitive match, but people try to get residencies at different places for many different reasons. Some programs are well-rounded; some are strong in &lt;insert subspecialty of ENT here&gt;; others are well-known for getting residents great fellowships; others are known for outstanding academics.

    I interviewed at places in Chicago, NYC, Boston, and Philadelphia. All of those represent the "big cities" in the mid-west and east coast.

    I think that the programs in these large cities have many pluses and minuses.

    Chicago: University of Illinois I liked, despite its somewhat run-down facilities (except the TBL). Univ of Chicago takes only one applicant, as does Rush (which is usually their own). Loyola is good, but I still liked UIC better. Northwestern didn't impress me. I don't recall hearing anything about subsidized housing for these programs.

    NYC: NYEEI seemed nice, but it's heavily office-based during the first year, and residents don't start getting any signigicant surgical experience until PGY-3. NYU, Columbia, and Brookyln are fine places as well. Mount Sinai is probably the best place in NYC, but it's probably one of the most malignant places in the country. (I suppose that's why they didn't fill all of their spots initially [still?].) Most of these programs have subsidized housing through their respective medical centers.

    Boston: Tufts is in serious financial trouble. The chair of Tufts (Shapshay) left to take a position at Boston Medical. The Boston Medical residents work very hard, but their experience is superb, IMHO. Mass Eye and Ear, well, I've heard too many people state that they don't operate very well. I'm not aware of any subsidized housing.

    Philadelphia: Penn -- see above's Mass Eye comment, though Penn would be a much better place to go than Mass Eye. Jefferson -- absolutely superb. Temple -- don't bother. No subsidized housing.

    But, in my opinion, the best programs are at places like Wash U, Ohio State, UVA, Michigan, and Iowa. Of these, I applied to Wash U, UVA, and Iowa. Turned down interviews at Iowa and Wash U because I didn't want to live there. UVA didn't want me (oh well). All of these places are excellent.

    So, in my opinion, the best programs aren't in the big cities. On the other hand, given your needs and wants, the best programs may be in the big cities...catch my drift?
     

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