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As a pre-med, should I major in Biology or Neuroscience? Like which one is it harder to maintain a competitive GPA? And which one has the most overlap with the pre-med classes? (bio, chem, physics, calc etc)
 

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Agree with above. Nobody cares what your major is. To your point, they are of comparable difficulty with considerable overlap in curriculum.
 
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As a pre-med, should I major in Biology or Neuroscience? Like which one is it harder to maintain a competitive GPA? And which one has the most overlap with the pre-med classes? (bio, chem, physics, calc etc)

If you are looking for the "easiest" route, go Biology. It is likely to have the most overlap with premedical courses. But there are several things to consider when choosing a major:

1: If you are unable to go into medicine, what's your back-up plan? If you'd hate life as a researcher or Ph.D., I would advise against completing a major in Biology. You should choose the field where you would be happiest outside of medicine. This way, if you decide against medical school or are not admitted, your life will not be thrown off-track. You can still enter a career that will make you happy.

2: This is in a similar tone to my first point, but what subjects do you enjoy the most? The more you enjoy your courses, the easier it will be to get a higher GPA.

3: While medical schools do not care what you major in, unique and interesting courses can be great talking points in interviews and essays.

4: Many medical schools recommend you take some upper level biology courses. This isn't necessarily a point in favor of majoring in Biology, but rather a consideration when looking at course plans.
 
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If you are looking for the "easiest" route, go Biology. It is likely to have the most overlap with premedical courses. But there are several things to consider when choosing a major:

1: If you are unable to go into medicine, what's your back-up plan? If you'd hate life as a researcher or Ph.D., I would advise against completing a major in Biology. You should choose the field where you would be happiest outside of medicine. This way, if you decide against medical school or are not admitted, your life will not be thrown off-track. You can still enter a career that will make you happy.

2: This is in a similar tone to my first point, but what subjects do you enjoy the most? The more you enjoy your courses, the easier it will be to get a higher GPA.

3: While medical schools do not care what you major in, unique and interesting courses can be great talking points in interviews and essays.

4: Many medical schools recommend you take some upper level biology courses. This isn't necessarily a point in favor of majoring in Biology, but rather a consideration when looking at course plans.
This^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^. The one that will be harder to maintain a competitive GPA will be the one that is harder for you, not me, or anyone else!! :)

TBH, you are approaching this from the wrong direction. If you are really looking for the easiest path, with the easiest grades and the least amount of work (most overlap with prereqs) the answer is to pick something other than medicine, which is far from the easiest path. :cool:

As everyone else has advised, med schools really, really, really don't care what you major in. They actually love diversity, but, at the end of the day, a lot of people who are drawn to medicine are also drawn to bio, chem, biochem, etc., so you see more of that than music majors. You really need to start by figuring out what you love, rather than what will be the easiest to do well in. If you do this right, they will end up being the same thing. Good luck!!!
 
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deleted889094

If I could have done it all over, I'd have majored in a language and minored in chem rather than the other way around. As longs as you get the pre-reqs it doesn't matter. Do something you enjoy that will be useful. Language was super rewarding for me.
 
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This^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^. The one that will be harder to maintain a competitive GPA will be the one that is harder for you, not me, or anyone else!! :)

TBH, you are approaching this from the wrong direction. If you are really looking for the easiest path, with the easiest grades and the least amount of work (most overlap with prereqs) the answer is to pick something other than medicine, which is far from the easiest path. :cool:

As everyone else has advised, med schools really, really, really don't care what you major in. They actually love diversity, but, at the end of the day, a lot of people who are drawn to medicine are also drawn to bio, chem, biochem, etc., so you see more of that than music majors. You really need to start by figuring out what you love, rather than what will be the easiest to do well in. If you do this right, they will end up being the same thing. Good luck!!!
Despite all ^^^^^^ that, if you are still looking for an easier major to get good GPA, look at the requirements for both majors at your school and talk with seniors who did those majors and decide.
 

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Despite all ^^^^^^ that, if you are still looking for an easier major to get good GPA, look at the requirements for both majors at your school and talk with seniors who did those majors and decide.
Again, if you're looking for an easier path, I humbly suggest computer science, business, law, consulting, etc. :cool:
 
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Again, if you're looking for an easier path, I humbly suggest computer science, business, law, consulting, etc. :cool:

Easier? Probably. Easy? Not by a long shot. Computer science is immensely difficult. While you don’t have to go to medical school, the sheer culture of competition in CS and the expected long hours are horrific. The content is very challenging.

I cannot speak on law school or consulting.

Investment banking may pay well, but the competition is just as bad as CS and the hours even worse. 100 hour weeks are the norm for your first several years. The burnout rate is incredible. The content isn’t as complicated, however.
 
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Easier? Probably. Easy? Not by a long shot. Computer science is immensely difficult. While you don’t have to go to medical school, the sheer culture of competition in CS and the expected long hours are horrific. The content is very challenging.

I cannot speak on law school or consulting.

Investment banking may pay well, but the competition is just as bad as CS and the hours even worse. 100 hour weeks are the norm for your first several years. The burnout rate is incredible. The content isn’t as complicated, however.
Sarcasm doesn't travel well over the Internet. I was being facetious. Nothing is easy if done well, least of all, of course, medicine. Investment banking at a large firm also involves tons of hard work to get there, and crazy hours. My point was really just to say that looking for the easy out is not a path to success, and medicine is probably not the best career for people who are looking for that.

@EdgeTrimmer is well meaning in offering the advice, but I think it's a little disingenuous insofar as his own son seems to be doing very well without needing to find an easier major to get a good GPA. The key to success, in medicine or in anything else, is to find something you love and are good at, and to then do well. Not asking seniors whether philosophy majors, sociology majors, or chemical engineering majors have higher average GPAs. The person who loves ChemE and is good at it will do better there than in philosophy, regardless of mean GPAs.

Moreover, adcoms are looking for the X Factor, not the Easy Factor. The person following @EdgeTrimmer's advice in structuring a course of study to maximize a GPA is likely to also be looking for easier paths to other elements in an application, and that will be apparent to anyone reviewing the application. JMHO, but I think the key to success is to find what you love (academics, ECs, etc.) and excel at them, not take well-meaning parents' advice to seek the easy path. The easy path is easy for a reason, and it's really hard to distinguish yourself on it.
 
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Sarcasm doesn't travel well over the Internet. I was being facetious. Nothing is easy if done well, least of all, of course, medicine. Investment banking at a large firm also involves tons of hard work to get there, and crazy hours. My point was really just to say that looking for the easy out is not a path to success, and medicine is probably not the best career for people who are looking for that.

@EdgeTrimmer is well meaning in offering the advice, but I think it's a little disingenuous insofar as his own son seems to be doing very well without needing to find an easier major to get a good GPA. The key to success, in medicine or in anything else, is to find something you love and are good at, and to then do well. Not asking seniors whether philosophy majors, sociology majors, or chemical engineering majors have higher average GPAs. The person who loves ChemE and is good at it will do better there than in philosophy, regardless of mean GPAs.

Moreover, adcoms are looking for the X Factor, not the Easy Factor. The person following @EdgeTrimmer's advice in structuring a course of study to maximize a GPA is likely to also be looking for easier paths to other elements in an application, and that will be apparent to anyone reviewing the application. JMHO, but I think the key to success is to find what you love (academics, ECs, etc.) and excel at them, not take well-meaning parents' advice to seek the easy path. The easy path is easy for a reason, and it's really hard to distinguish yourself on it.

To be fair, there are some who find medical school easy and excel. They're just brilliant. Sometimes things are hard because you're at the top of your capacity or working against your strengths. Loving what you do helps, but it seems like that's not enough for some.
 
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To be fair, there are some who find medical school easy and excel. They're just brilliant. Sometimes things are hard because you're at the top of your capacity or working against your strengths. Loving what you do helps, but it seems like that's not enough for some.
Very, very true. It's also true that around 40% of applicants succeed every year, and the rest don't. We don't all have the same abilities, resources, support systems, etc. Life is very unfair in that respect.

My only point was that the clearest path to success is to find something you love, and excel at it. Looking for the easier path, in a process in which the majority of applicants fail, just doesn't seem like a recipe for success. This is because this atitude probably won't be limited to selecting a major, and will be evident throughout the application.

Don't get me wrong, I'm sure @EdgeTrimmer will have several n=1 examples to support anything he posts, but that's not the point. The point is that the person who has to choose a major based on what is easy to get a high GPA in, rather than being talented enough to get a high GPA in a subject that actually excites the applicant, is probably going to be a sign of weaknesses with the applicant and the application that will prove to be impediments to a successful cycle.

Not in all case with all people, but in general. After all, as rigorous as the process is, it's not infallible. Some people will successfully game the system. Many, many, many very talented and deserving people will be rejected every year while others will slip through and then not be able to graduate. It happens.
 

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@EdgeTrimmer is well meaning in offering the advice, but I think it's a little disingenuous insofar as his own son seems to be doing very well without needing to find an easier major to get a good GPA.
My son has national level achievements in Biology and Chemistry during HS so he took related major even though his major is considered tougher than Neuroscience at his T20 school. So since OP is looking for easier major I am giving advise based on his requirements not based on how my son did :)
 
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My son has national level achievements in Biology and Chemistry during HS so he took related major even though his major is considered tougher than Neuroscience at his T20 school. So since OP is looking for easier major I am giving advise based on his requirements not based on how my son did :)
My point EXACTLY. I don't think it's a good look to provide advice you don't follow yourself.
 
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Very, very true. It's also true that around 40% of applicants succeed every year, and the rest don't. We don't all have the same abilities, resources, support systems, etc. Life is very unfair in that respect.

My only point was that the clearest path to success is to find something you love, and excel at it. Looking for the easier path, in a process in which the majority of applicants fail, just doesn't seem like a recipe for success. This is because this atitude probably won't be limited to selecting a major, and will be evident throughout the application.

Don't get me wrong, I'm sure @EdgeTrimmer will have several n=1 examples to support anything he posts, but that's not the point. The point is that the person who has to choose a major based on what is easy to get a high GPA in, rather than being talented enough to get a high GPA in a subject that actually excites the applicant, is probably going to be a sign of weaknesses with the applicant and the application that will prove to be impediments to a successful cycle.

Not in all case with all people, but in general. After all, as rigorous as the process is, it's not infallible. Some people will successfully game the system. Many, many, many very talented and deserving people will be rejected every year while others will slip through and then not be able to graduate. It happens.
Makes sense. Except not sure I agree with the last paragraph fully. But I see your point. And I'm sure your perspective will be built upon further when you matriculate and start getting to know some classmates.
 
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Don't get me wrong, I'm sure @EdgeTrimmer will have several n=1 examples to support anything he posts, but that's not the point. The point is that the person who has to choose a major based on what is easy to get a high GPA in, rather than being talented enough to get a high GPA in a subject that actually excites the applicant, is probably going to be a sign of weaknesses with the applicant and the application that will prove to be impediments to a successful cycle.
Don't try to be critical of every post :cool: I see nothing wrong in taking some what easier major if that helps OP or anyone else to get into medical school. I don't subscribe to plan Bs or plan C :) I have few N=1 examples of taking GPA hits by taking something you love (BME at tough schools like JHU) and end up at so called low tier schools after gap years. So as a parent I tried to give practical advise :)
 

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Don't try to be critical of every post :cool: I see nothing wrong in taking some what easier major if that helps OP or anyone else to get into medical school. I don't subscribe to plan Bs or plan C :) I have few N=1 examples of taking GPA hits by taking something you love (BME at tough schools like JHU) and end up at so called low tier schools after gap years. So as a parent I tried to give practical advise :)
I can't help it, especially with you! :cool: But, don't get me wrong, my suggestion is NOT to take BME at JHU and hope for the best. It's to pick based on what you love AND ARE GOOD AT, rather than working back from what seniors say is easier. Precisely what your kid did. We can all do it, even if we do not have national level achievements in whatever. Your practical advice sucks because it advocates the easy path of least resistance, which doesn't result in an application like your kid has, and ultimately doesn't help anyone go anywhere in a process in which 60% are screened out.
 
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I can't help it, especially with you! :cool: But, don't get me wrong, my suggestion is NOT to take BME at JHU and hope for the best. It's to pick based on what you love AND ARE GOOD AT, rather than working back from what seniors say is easier. What your kid did. Your practical advice sucks because it advocates the easy path of least resistance, which doesn't result in an application like your kid has, and ultimately doesn't help anyone go anywhere in a process in which 60% are screened out.
TBH, I agree with @EdgeTrimmer more on this. I'm having an easier time with med school then undergrad - and it's not because my undergrad major was necessarily harder or easier.

You should be careful criticizing other people for giving advice. I've gathered you have not yet applied and I see you give your thoughts on this forum plenty. So I don't think you should be getting on @EdgeTrimmer 's case here. Besides, advice isn't inherently good or bad based solely on who gives it. Hence why it's acceptable for you to give your thoughts as much as edge trimmer.
 
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I can't help it, especially with you! :cool: But, don't get me wrong, my suggestion is NOT to take BME at JHU and hope for the best. It's to pick based on what you love AND ARE GOOD AT, rather than working back from what seniors say is easier. What your kid did. Your practical advice sucks because it advocates the easy path of least resistance, which doesn't result in an application like your kid has, and ultimately doesn't help anyone go anywhere.
Let's get serious, OP is not asking between Biology and basket weaving. Again, given that medical schools doesn't care about GPA if it helps OP to get good GPA by choosing one of those two majors I don't see an issue with it. In fact major my kid is doing the least resistance major (and chose not to double majors or double minors) and I advocated against going to JHU for BME. My kid's application is not driven by his major but more strength in multiple areas.
 
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TBH, I agree with @EdgeTrimmer more on this. I'm having an easier time with med school then undergrad - and it's not because my undergrad major was necessarily harder or easier.

You should be careful criticizing other people for giving advice. I've gathered you have not yet applied and I see you give your thoughts on this forum plenty. So I don't think you should be getting on @EdgeTrimmer 's case here. Besides, advice isn't inherently good or bad based solely on who gives it. Hence why it's acceptable for you to give your thoughts as much as edge trimmer.
That's ok. @knighdoc and I love to debate each other and I don't take anything -vely.
 
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TBH, I agree with @EdgeTrimmer more on this. I'm having an easier time with med school then undergrad - and it's not because my undergrad major was necessarily harder or easier.

You should be careful criticizing other people for giving advice. I've gathered you have not yet applied and I see you give your thoughts on this forum plenty. So I don't think you should be getting on @EdgeTrimmer 's case here. Besides, advice isn't inherently good or bad based solely on who gives it. Hence why it's acceptable for you to give your thoughts as much as edge trimmer.
Very fair. But, please keep in mind, @EdgeTrimmer is a parent and also hasn't applied. The difference is, he'll never be applying (I think! :)).

I'm glad you're finding med school easier than UG, but what does that have to do with picking a UG major based on what you like and are good at rather than on what someone tells you will be easier to get a higher GPA in for a med school app? Don't you agree that the person doing that is likely to do everything based on how it looks on a med school app, and that is exactly the type of applicant screened out during the process?
 

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Let's get serious, OP is not asking between Biology and basket weaving. Again, given that medical schools doesn't care about GPA if it helps OP to get good GPA by choosing one of those two majors I don't see an issue with it. In fact major my kid is doing the least resistance major (and chose not to double majors or double minors) and I advocated against going to JHU for BME. My kid's application is not driven by his major but more strength in multiple areas.
You kid is GREAT, and what you're saying now is no different from what I'm saying -- pick the one you like more (like your kid), because that's the one you will do better in. Not the one that other people say is easier. This has nothing to do with not going out of your way to make things difficult by quadruple majoring. :cool:
 
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Very fair. But, please keep in mind, @EdgeTrimmer is a parent and also hasn't applied. The difference is, he'll never be applying (I think! :)).

I'm glad you're finding med school easier than UG, but what does that have to do with picking a UG major based on what you like and are good at rather than on what someone tells you will be easier to get a higher GPA in for a med school app? Don't you agree that the person doing that is likely to do everything based on how it looks on a med school app, and that is exactly the type of applicant screened out during the process?

In a similar note, what does any of this discussion do to further answer the OP's question? I thought we already answered their question quite well.
 
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Very fair. But, please keep in mind, @EdgeTrimmer is a parent and also hasn't applied. The difference is, he'll never be applying (I think! :)).
My experience comes from interacting with physicians and medical school faculty for last 20 years, advising my own kid thru UG and medical school applications and also talking with kids who attend/attended top schools, not from SDN browsing :cool:
 
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You kid is GREAT, and what you're saying now is no different from what I'm saying -- pick the one you like more (like your kid), because that's the one you will do better in. Not the one that other people say is easier. This has nothing to do with not going out of your way to make things difficult by quadruple majoring. :cool:
let's say OP likes both Biology and Neuroscience (which has lot of Biology classes), what will you tell them?
 
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I have nothing to contribute, but I just wanted to join the cool kids with the sunglasses :cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool:
 
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Very fair. But, please keep in mind, @EdgeTrimmer is a parent and also hasn't applied. The difference is, he'll never be applying (I think! :)).

I'm glad you're finding med school easier than UG, but what does that have to do with picking a UG major based on what you like and are good at rather than on what someone tells you will be easier to get a higher GPA in for a med school app? Don't you agree that the person doing that is likely to do everything based on how it looks on a med school app, and that is exactly the type of applicant screened out during the process?

My main point is that you shouldn't criticize edge trimmer for "not taking their own advice" when you have not applied. Either both your takes are valid, or neither are.

As for you point about majors, most people in med school are fairly by the books in my experience. There are many different considerations for picking a major. I don't think it can be reduced to a single point of decision. Like, you want to enjoy what you learn, but you also want to be challenged so you grow. You also probably want to make sure you are prepared for the MCAT. You may also want to get letters of rec or research opportunities from certain professors.

This isn't a hill that needs to be died upon. OP can weigh both of your thoughts and see what's best for them.
 
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@Laughingcow You're the guy who made a post a couple of days ago about taking 5 years to complete undergrad so you can take like 3 courses a semester right? Why not just choose a major like sociology or psychology and take pre-med reqs if you're looking for the path of least resistance. Neither biology or neuroscience really gets you anywhere if you're planning on putting in the bare minimum. Looking into cross application relevance in the field of neuroscience will require even more effort because the field in and of itself has limited application and most of the cutting edge applications favor the computer science side making the major in and of itself somewhat eh rather than ai.
 
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My experience comes from interacting with physicians and medical school faculty for last 20 years, advising my own kid thru UG and medical school applications and also talking with kids who attend/attended top schools, not from SDN browsing :cool:
Okay, and mine comes from interacting with actual applicants, premed advisors, admissions directors at several schools, and, of course, SDN browsing. I'm not disputing your interest or good intentions, but I've learned the hard way to dismiss advice from people who tell me to do as they say, not as they do. :cool:
 

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let's say OP likes both Biology and Neuroscience (which has lot of Biology classes), what will you tell them?
To take the one he has more interest in, because that's the one he'll do better in, regardless of mean GPAs. If everything is equal, he should flip a coin because it doesn't matter.

I honestly can't tell you how many classes ratemyprofessor told me to stay away from because the professor is a tough grader, where I took the class anyway and did well. I did well because I'm smart and motivated, and was interested in the subject. The professors were uniformly great, but had crappy ratings because they demanded class participation and didn't just give easy grades.
 

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Okay, and mine comes from interacting with actual applicants, premed advisors, admissions directors at several schools, and, of course, SDN browsing. I'm not disputing your interest or good intentions, but I've learned the hard way to dismiss advice from people who tell me to do as they say, not as they do. :cool:
You haven't applied yet so how do we know you applied all you learned :) Can you elaborate on second point.
 

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To take the one he has more interest in, because that's the one he'll do better in, regardless of mean GPAs. If everything is equal, he should flip a coin because it doesn't matter.

I honestly can't tell you how many classes ratemyprofessor told me to stay away from because the professor is a tough grader, where I took the class anyway and did well. I did well because I'm smart and motivated, and was interested in the subject. The professors were uniformly great, but had crappy ratings because they demanded class participation and didn't just give easy grades.
But not everyone is smart and hard working as you :cool: Some need advise from strangers on SDN or ratemyprofessor reviews to be comfortable. I also recommend kids checking that site but again you need to parse the info there properly.
 
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My main point is that you shouldn't criticize edge trimmer for "not taking their own advice" when you have not applied. Either both your takes are valid, or neither are.

As for you point about majors, most people in med school are fairly by the books in my experience. There are many different considerations for picking a major. I don't think it can be reduced to a single point of decision. Like, you want to enjoy what you learn, but you also want to be challenged so you grow. You also probably want to make sure you are prepared for the MCAT. You may also want to get letters of rec or research opportunities from certain professors.

This isn't a hill that needs to be died upon. OP can weigh both of your thoughts and see what's best for them.
I haven't applied, but I'm not a 9th grader just busting chops here because I'm bored. I attend a UG, declared a major, attended countless premed advising sessions, taken the MCAT, spoken to tons of knowledgeable people, etc. I have neither applied to nor been accepted to med school yet, and, of course, do not have the perspective of a med student, but I have as much first hand knowledge of the premed experience as anyone, so I'm not totally clueless here, and have WAAAAY more first hand experience than any of my peer's parents!!!!!
 

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You haven't applied yet so how do we know you applied all you learned :) Can you elaborate on second point.
Because I'm far enough along in the process (taken classes, finishing up a major, taken the MCAT, etc.) to know how this works with respect to picking classes and majors based on easy grading. I'm modelling the successful behavior of your son rather than the questionable advice of his dad!!! :cool:
 
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I haven't applied, but I'm not a 9th grader just busting chops here because I'm bored. I attend a UG, declared a major, attended countless premed advising sessions, taken the MCAT, spoken to tons of knowledgeable people, etc. I have neither applied to nor been accepted to med school yet, and, of course, do not have the perspective of a med student, but I have as much first hand knowledge of the premed experience as anyone, so I'm not totally clueless here, and have WAAAAY more first hand experience than any of my peer's parents!!!!!

How was the MCAT? Did you take it after the pandemic started?
 

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I rejected my medical school acceptance, just so I could permanently be a pre-med on SDN. Also it seems like there's a lot of sus on KnightDoc...
 
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KnightDoc

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But not everyone is smart and hard working as you :cool: Some need advise from strangers on SDN or ratemyprofessor reviews to be comfortable. I also recommend kids checking that site but again you need to parse the info there properly.
Absolutely, that's why I check it out, and I did avoid two profs who had universally terrible reviews over a number of years. My point is that picking classes or majors based on easy grading is a fool's errand in an environment where 60% will be weeded out. You need to find something you're good at and then excel, not follow the easy path the majority follows. It pays to remember that the majority do not become MDs.
 
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KnightDoc

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How was the MCAT? Did you take it after the pandemic started?
Funny you ask!!! Yes, and it's a big reason why I'm not a current applicant. I was scheduled for April, then June, and couldn't take it until August. It was fine, aside from the fact that I couldn't focus on apps while studying, and then felt like I didn't have sufficient time to apply beginning in late August. Plus, my ECs also suck, given no hours since March and no visibility into when they'll resume in person.
 
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Funny you ask!!! Yes, and it's a big reason why I'm not a current applicant. I was scheduled for April, then June, and couldn't take it until August. It was fine, aside from the fact that I couldn't focus on apps while studying, and then feel like I had sufficient time to apply beginning in late August. Plus, my ECs also suck, given no hours since March and no visibility into when they'll resume in person.

We're rooting for you.
 
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KnightDoc

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We're rooting for you.
I really appreciate that. I'm not complaining, just explaining why I'm a wannabe again this year after annoying the community as a premed giving advice without an active application last year as well! :cool: I do feel like I have something to offer, given how I've been obsessing on this, really since starting UG but especially since Spring 2019. Unfortunately, to a greater or lesser degree, some members don't agree, but @EdgeTrimmer and I have definitely formed a mutual admiration society.
 
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I really appreciate that. I'm not complaining, just explaining why I'm a wannabe again this year after annoying the community as a premed giving advice without an active application last year as well! :cool: I do feel like I have something to offer, given how I've been obsessing on this, really since starting UG but especially since Spring 2019. Unfortunately, to a greater or lesser degree, some members don't agree, but @EdgeTrimmer and I have definitely formed a mutual admiration society.

I think it's useful for members of the community to get multiple perspectives. Someone like me who hasn't been through the application cycle in over a decade won't be able to talk about all the nuances that a current premed would.
 
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D

deleted889094

I haven't applied, but I'm not a 9th grader just busting chops here because I'm bored. I attend a UG, declared a major, attended countless premed advising sessions, taken the MCAT, spoken to tons of knowledgeable people, etc. I have neither applied to nor been accepted to med school yet, and, of course, do not have the perspective of a med student, but I have as much first hand knowledge of the premed experience as anyone, so I'm not totally clueless here, and have WAAAAY more first hand experience than any of my peer's parents!!!!!
As far as I can tell, I'd put you both on the same level of authority for giving advice
 
D

deleted889094

All perspectives, so long as they don't reproduce blatantly false information, are useful.
Right. My whole deal has been to say nobody should be attacking credibility here. Just let advice be what it is.
 
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If getting discredited on SDN means I won't be tripled with COVID (+), BMI > 50, DM type 2 patients then I openly deny having any involvement in healthcare and that this has all been a massive internet ego trip.
 
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KnightDoc

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If getting discredited on SDN means I won't be tripled with COVID (+), BMI > 50, DM type 2 patients then I openly deny having any involvement in healthcare and that this has all been a massive internet ego trip.
I thought you were joking -- did you really give up an acceptance? If so, why, and what's the plan going forward? If not, please explain the joke for those of us not sharp enough to follow along.
 
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I thought you were joking -- did you really give up an acceptance? If so, why, and what's the plan going forward? If not, please explain the joke for those of us not sharp enough to follow along.
Oh. It's nothing like that. I chose not to pursue medical school awhile ago due to opportunity cost. I'm also pretty satisfied with my current RN job in the ICU. I do have an initial major in biochemistry & bioinformatics. The joke is that ICUs are being slammed with COVID patients to the point where RNs are being tripled or quadrupled and a lot of them require intubation with body weight > 400 pounds, BMI > 50, and Diabetes Type 2. Which isn't so bad... however the involvement required in turning patients, ACHS blood sugars, QH respiratory checks, and putting initial IVs to run stuff like remdesivir when most of the field sticks are no bueno takes a toll when you're doing it day in and day out. In a perfect world, RN to patient ratios should be 1:2. However, since when was the last time we lived in a perfect world. :laugh:
 
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mdaspirant22

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Neuroscience, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology more or less fall in the same category. Depends on what subject interest you. Bigger question is what to do if Med School doesn't work.
 
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