merlin

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 3, 2001
246
1
What a long strange trip it's been....
Visit site
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Okay, so I feel that over the last year I have seen a majority of black suits being worn by residency applicants. Are my eyes seeing things? It seems like black is a super formal suit to wear. Way off base? Can you go wrong with a black suit? Just last minute details to take care of...
 

njbmd

Guest
Moderator Emeritus
5+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 30, 2001
9,050
153
Gone Walkabout!
Visit site
Status
Attending Physician
merlin said:
Okay, so I feel that over the last year I have seen a majority of black suits being worn by residency applicants. Are my eyes seeing things? It seems like black is a super formal suit to wear. Way off base? Can you go wrong with a black suit? Just last minute details to take care of...
Hi there,
It does start to look like a mortician's convention around the hospital this time of year. You can look just fine in a dark gray or navy blue suit as long as it fits properly. There is nothing worse than being poorly groomed black suit or not. Make sure everything else looks good too; shoes polished and not scuffed, shirt is clean and tie is conservative but not stuffy.

Here come the March of the Penguins!

njbmd :)
 

UDgerl

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2005
10
0
Status
Medical Student
Iserson overanalyzes this factor in "getting into a residency" and its unfortunately an issue that many of us therefore worry about. I think its importrant to remember that you are interviewing the program as much as they are interviewing you. If the color of your suit (assuming it isn't orange/bright red/etc) is a significant factor in the program's decision would you really want to work there for 5+ years?

By this point, you shouldn't need to be told to not wear dirty, scuffed, or wrinkled clothing though we have all seen the rare exception. The color of your suit is far less important than you may think. I have met attendings and residents who have interviewed in maroon, navy, grey, beige, brown and black. Their advice: don't wear what you know you aren't comfortable in! A good fit and comfort will let who you are shine through.....and the color will become as non-memorable as it should be. :thumbup:
 
About the Ads

FACS

jolly good fellow
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 26, 2005
119
0
Status
Like the previous poster just said....just be yourself . :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
 

tigershark

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2004
333
3
Status
A black suit is tacky for a daytime interview.

Do not underestimate the importance of your appearance, it can indeed make or break your interview. There's mountains of research on the topic. A good book for anyone interested in being successful in the professional world to read is "Dress for Success" by john molloy.

"Just be yourself" is bad advice, and usually what you hear fat chicks and ugly people saying.
 

FACS

jolly good fellow
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 26, 2005
119
0
Status
tigershark said:
"Just be yourself" is bad advice, and usually what you hear fat chicks and ugly people saying.
:thumbup:
 

Roux-en-Y

Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 16, 2004
64
0
Status
UDgerl said:
Iserson overanalyzes this factor in "getting into a residency" and its unfortunately an issue that many of us therefore worry about. I think its importrant to remember that you are interviewing the program as much as they are interviewing you. If the color of your suit (assuming it isn't orange/bright red/etc) is a significant factor in the program's decision would you really want to work there for 5+ years?

By this point, you shouldn't need to be told to not wear dirty, scuffed, or wrinkled clothing though we have all seen the rare exception. The color of your suit is far less important than you may think. I have met attendings and residents who have interviewed in maroon, navy, grey, beige, brown and black. Their advice: don't wear what you know you aren't comfortable in! A good fit and comfort will let who you are shine through.....and the color will become as non-memorable as it should be. :thumbup:
Most important is that you are comfortable and confident about what you are wearing (and everything else including your CV). Your interview day is much too important to be distracted by your appearance, wondering if you're underdressed. If you feel best in a black suit, wear it.

My interview suit color was dark "true" navy. My 2 cents.
 

UDgerl

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2005
10
0
Status
Medical Student
Neither fat or ugly I gave my advice which is what this forum is all about. There is no need to be rude, Tigershark, when you post a response.
 

Ergo

Integrated Resident
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 27, 2004
244
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
The fact is, most programs want someone who is polished and professional - someone who can fit into their program and into the surgery culture as a professional throughout their career.

Per my Chairman - female, holds national academic leadership positions...etc.
*A dark black, charcoal, or navy suit is a traditional formal suit for professional interviews. A colored suit (royal blue or maroon for example) can be worn IF it is a conservative cut and a very nice quality material with conservative shoes and accessories.)* Its all got to be polished - shoes, pressed shirt, appropriate professional suit... your behavior and confidence.

Of course, if you pair that suit with a wrinkled or faded cotton button-up from Old-Navy that ruins the whole look. I saw this girl from Southwestern wearing a faded blue shirt that looked like she puled it off the floor of her closet. Its almost rude to dress so unprofessionally for an interview

To dress professionally is a sign of respect for the program and savy for professional behavior.

my $0.02.
 

tigershark

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2004
333
3
Status
UDgerl said:
Neither fat or ugly I gave my advice which is what this forum is all about. There is no need to be rude, Tigershark, when you post a response.
And my opinion is that your advice is bad, which is what this forum is all about. I did not say that you were fat and ugly, only that "be yourself" the kind of thing fat and/or ugly people often say.
 
About the Ads