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kosal7

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Hello, I was wondering if anyone could recommend some interesting books to read that are either medically related or non-related. Thank you.
 
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Prometheus123

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I'd recommend The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius and The Obstacle Is The Way.
 
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Phile98

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E.Hemingway

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Related to medicine:

- Pathologies of Power by Paul Farmer (and anything else he has written)

- Mountains Beyond Mointains by Tracy Kidder (biography of Paul Farmer)

- The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee ("biography" of cancer)

- When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalinithi

- Being Mortal by Atul Gawande (and anything else he has written)

- The Plague by Albert Camus (semi-philosophical novel)

- House of God by Samuel Shem (Catch-22 adapted to the context of medicine)

- The Death of Ivan Ilych (novella) by Tolstoy (powerful exploration of the human condition and mortality, extremely influential, must read imo)

- The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander (Not directly related to medicine, but I think the politics of oppression are important to understand as a physician and certainly as an American)
 
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LizzyM

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- The Plague by Albert Camus (semi-philosophical novel)

The Plague is an allegory of the German occupation of France during WWII. I don't know what is philosophical about it but then again, I've been trying to read it for about 3 years... it is never as engaging as I hope it might be.
 
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laffytaffy19

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I recommend reading "How to win friends and influence people" by Dale Carnegie. It's great at teaching skills on how to be a better listener/conversationalist and how to handle people tactfully. Some rules may sound repetitive but it helps to hammer in ideas, and I think it may be of use to you since doctors interact with patients/other doctors all the time.
 
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E.Hemingway

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The Plague is an allegory of the German occupation of France during WWII. I don't know what is philosophical about it but then again, I've been trying to read it for about 3 years... it is never as engaging as I hope it might be.

All of Camus's novels are philosophical, some more than others. Are you familiar with his philosophy of absurdism? In my opinion, The Plague proposes an answer to the question, "What does one do once they come to the realization that the universe is meaningless? Given that humans have an inherent drive to find purpose in all things, and especially in their lives, how are they supposed to react to an infinite, cold, indifferent universe?" Camus grew up in the wake of the Spanish Civil War and WWII. He suffered an existential crisis in response to the horrendous, unbelievable events that plagued his early life. He and many of his contemporaries (Sartre, Hemingway, Picasso) struggled with this idea and their works were all heavily influenced by those tragic events.

Camus, in his philosophy of absurdism, argues that the only path forward is to choose a purpose for oneself and strive toward it without all of one's might. Suicide, religion, and nihilism are not the answers, and, he argues, are actually immoral.

I think The Plague explores that idea. The physician in the novel, the protagonist, decides his purpose, in the face of insurmountable odds, is to serve the people of the town afflicted by the Plague. He does so with courage and resilience and never looks back. He acts in accordance with the highest moral principles, according to the philosophy of Camus.

If you finish the novel, which I recommend you do, I think you will see what I'm getting at. I hope this all makes sense. It's one of my favorite novels.
 
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Prometheus123

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All of Camus's novels are philosophical, some more than others. Are you familiar with his philosophy of absurdism? In my opinion, The Plague proposes an answer to the question, "What does one do once they come to the realization that the universe is meaningless? Given that humans have an inherent drive to find purpose in all things, and especially in their lives, how are they supposed to react to an infinite, cold, indifferent universe?" Camus grew up in the wake of the Spanish Civil War and WWII. He suffered an existential crisis in response to the horrendous, unbelievable events that plagued his early life. He and many of his contemporaries (Sartre, Hemingway, Picasso) struggled with this idea and their works were all heavily influenced by those tragic events.

Camus, in his philosophy of absurdism, argues that the only path forward is to choose a purpose for oneself and strive toward it without all of one's might. Suicide, religion, and nihilism are not the answers, and, he argues, are actually immoral.

I think The Plague explores that idea. The physician in the novel, the protagonist, decides his purpose, in the face of insurmountable odds, is to serve the people of the town afflicted by the Plague. He does so with courage and resilience and never looks back. He acts in accordance with the highest moral principles, according to the philosophy of Camus.

If you finish the novel, which I recommend you do, I think you will see what I'm getting at. I hope this all makes sense. It's one of my favorite novels.

Sounds inspiring. I'll try to put it on my VoiceDream and listen to it in the car at some point.
 
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Hello, I was wondering if anyone could recommend some interesting books to read that are either medically related or non-related. Thank you.

Anything by Bernard Cornwell
Laura Joh Rowland's Sano Ichiro detective novels
Any of the Easy Rawlins or Leonid McGill novels by Walter Moseley
Any of Sam Eastland's Inspector Pekkala novels

For something more medicine related:
The Emperor of all Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee

The Greatest Benefit to Mankind by Roy Porter

These stories by Berton Roueche:
The Medical Detectives;
The Medical Detectives II;
The Man Who Grew Two Breasts: And Other True Tales of Medical Detection;
A Man Named Hoffman and Other Narratives of Medical Detection
Eleven Blue Men and Other Narratives of Medical Detection
 
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