Kazaki

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Feb 15, 2016
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Incoming MS3 here. I looked at the few threads out there for books during 3rd year, and most of them are a few years old and I'm sure there are newer resources out there.
I made the mistake of buying every resource recommended to me by anyone during basic sciences (ended up spending a fortune), and I do not plan on making the same mistake again.
A few people in my class have gone out and bought Harrison's, and some other huge surgery books. I'm pretty sure these are overkill for a medical student. Right?
I've decided that I'm pretty much going to use uptodate as a reference for everything and I'll have a review book for each rotation, as well as have a pocket reference.

Pocket reference: I have the green book from mass gen for IM, but a few people on SDN swear by the one from UCSF. My school however, recommends the pocket reference from Oxford.

Clinical examination: My school recommends Macleod's. Most people on SDN recommend Bate's though. ??

Medicine: ??

Surgery: ??

Peds: ??

OBGYN: ??

Psych: ??

Neuro: ??
 

Crayola227

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I just answered this same thread today
 

Taddy Mason

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Based on an extensive SDN search, what was recommended by 4th years and students that just graduated from my school, and Amazon reviews here's what I came up with:

Case Files is good - surg and neuro have the worst reviews, but a new edition of the surg one comes out this month.

Pre-Test is good - surg and FM have the worst reviews. The issues with the surg one aren't too damning, but pretty much everyone says to stay away from the FM one.

Blueprints - most of these are 4+ plus years old and have pretty mixed reviews. Honestly, UpToDate is probably a better option.

Others:

Step up to Medicine has very solid reviews

Master the Boards for Step - mixed reviews but generally positive. Many suggest using both the Step 2 and Step 3 ones when studying for Step 2, but they shouldn't be your sole resources.

Bates - I used it during the first 2 years and liked it. I plan on continuing to use it during 3rd and 4th year.

UWorld - ~99% the students in the class above me and recent grads highly recommend doing UWorld throughout 3rd year and then making another pass just before Step 2.
 

lymphocyte

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Incoming MS3 here. I looked at the few threads out there for books during 3rd year, and most of them are a few years old and I'm sure there are newer resources out there.
I made the mistake of buying every resource recommended to me by anyone during basic sciences (ended up spending a fortune), and I do not plan on making the same mistake again.
A few people in my class have gone out and bought Harrison's, and some other huge surgery books. I'm pretty sure these are overkill for a medical student. Right?
I've decided that I'm pretty much going to use uptodate as a reference for everything and I'll have a review book for each rotation, as well as have a pocket reference.

Pocket reference: I have the green book from mass gen for IM, but a few people on SDN swear by the one from UCSF. My school however, recommends the pocket reference from Oxford.

Clinical examination: My school recommends Macleod's. Most people on SDN recommend Bate's though. ??

Medicine: ??

Surgery: ??

Peds: ??

OBGYN: ??

Psych: ??

Neuro: ??
1. The Oxford Handbook is obscenely British and not my cup of tea. Lots of musings and laugh-out-loud discursive nothings. Here's one example (selected at random): "But who prepared the mind of the first observer for these prismatic spectral lines [a metaphor for clinical signs]? Destiny, presumably. As such, many clinical signs have yet to be described. Keep looking. Sometimes a star is born." Okie dokie. Thanks Oxford. Very helpful.

2. Harrison's as a MS3 is frankly ridiculous. As in, worthy of frank ridicule (or maybe just a little ribbing). Time might be better spent (if you're aiming at that level of detail) on something like MKSAP. Very managment-oriented with fantastic questions and explanations. That's what the IM residents use to study anyways, so, in my experience, it's stuff they like to discuss. I'm also a big fan of 30 minutes of UpToDate every night, without fail, no matter how tired you are, for a patient you're following on the wards.

3. Resources really depend on what you're hoping to accomplish and what your preclinical baseline is. All the resources mentioned above are great. Here are my favourite resources as a clinical med student:

General Medicine: UpToDate, UCSF Hospitalist Handbook, Pocket Medicine, MKSAP (only if you have time), and NEJM Weekly Case Records

Clinical Exam: Sapira's "Art and Science of Bedside Diagnosis" and Cope's "Early Diagnosis of the Acute Abdomen" (seems random but that book just stuck with me).

Neuro
: Mass Gen Handbook, Harrison's Neuro Exam videos (!!), and Patton's "Neurological Differential Diagnosis" (the illustrations in this book make Netter's look like finger-painting) http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/how-to-do-well-on-the-neurology-clerkship-not-just-the-shelf.1202486/

Psych: Mass Gen Handbook, Shea's "Psychiatric Interviewing," and Carlat's "The Psychiatric Interview"

ICU: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/resources-for-the-icu.1209802/#post-17915613

General: UWorld, Felson's "Principles of Chest Roentgenology," "Acid-Base, Fluids, and Electrolytes Made Ridiculously Simple," ALL THINGS AMAL MATTU

Peds/OBGYN/Surgery: Not my strength. Can't confidently recommend any resources. I will say this for surgery: Surgical Recall for pimping, reading up on operative anatomy/indications/complications the night before (make sure you always check tomorrow's list), doing whatever it takes to make your teammates' lives easier (writing crappy notes and "being likable" doesn't count), zero whinging, knowing some basic floor medicine, and being able to instrument tie or two hand tie a well-placed square knot double-gloved goes pretty darn far. I also liked reading "Top Knife: Art and Craft in Trauma Surgery" and feeling like a total badass while doing so, even though I'm actually in fact a massive geekazoid (a surprise, I know).
 
Last edited:

StrongIslandDoc

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Jul 4, 2016
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1. The Oxford Handbook is obscenely British and not my cup of tea. Here's one example (selected at random): "But who prepared the mind of the first observer of these prismatic spectral lines [a metaphor for clinical signs]? Destiny, presumably. As such, many clinical signs have yet to be described. Keep looking. Sometimes a star is born." Okie dokie. Thanks Oxford. Very helpful.

2. Harrison's as a MS3 is worthy of frank ridicule (or maybe just a little ribbing). Time might be better spent (if you're aiming at that level of detail) on something like MKSAP. Very managment-oriented with fantastic questions and explanations. That's what the IM residents use to study anyways, so, in my experience, it's stuff they like to discuss. I'm also a big fan of 30 minutes of UpToDate every night, without fail, no matter how tired you are, for a patient you're following on the wards.

3. Resources really depend on what you're hoping to accomplish and what your preclinical baseline is. All the resources mentioned above are great. Here are my favourite resources as a clinical med student:

General Medicine: UpToDate, UCSF Hospitalist Handbook, Pocket Medicine, MKSAP (only if you have time), and NEJM Weekly Case Records

Clinical Exam: Sapira's "Art and Science of Bedside Diagnosis" and Cope's "Early Diagnosis of the Acute Abdomen" (seems random but that book just stuck with me).

Neuro
: Mass Gen Handbook, Harrison's Neuro Exam videos (!!), and Patton's "Neurological Differential Diagnosis" (the illustrations in this book make Netter's look like finger-painting) http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/how-to-do-well-on-the-neurology-clerkship-not-just-the-shelf.1202486/

Psych: Mass Gen Handbook, Shea's "Psychiatric Interviewing," and Carlat's "The Psychiatric Interview"

ICU: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/resources-for-the-icu.1209802/#post-17915613

General: UWorld, Felson's "Principles of Chest Roentgenology," "Acid-Base, Fluids, and Electrolytes Made Ridiculously Simple," ALL THINGS AMAL MATTU

Peds/OBGYN/Surgery: Not my strength. Can't confidently recommend any resources. I will say this for surgery: Surgical Recall for pimping, reading up on operative anatomy/indications/complications the night before (make sure you always check tomorrow's list), doing whatever it takes to make your teammates' lives easier (writing crappy notes doesn't count), knowing some basic floor medicine, and being able to instrument tie or two hand tie a well-placed square knot double-gloved goes pretty darn far. I also liked reading "Top Knife: Art and Craft in Trauma Surgery" and feeling like a total badass, when I'm actually in fact a massive geekazoid (a total surprise, I know).
Wtf Croc Dundee, I started a thread before this one - I thought we were buddies!
 

Crayola227

The Oncoming Storm
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Oct 22, 2013
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maybe the mod can merge the threads

who's mod for allopathic so we can tag them?
 

Amygdarya

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Pocket reference: I have the green book from mass gen for IM, but a few people on SDN swear by the one from UCSF. My school however, recommends the pocket reference from Oxford.

Clinical examination: My school recommends Macleod's. Most people on SDN recommend Bate's though.
Sounds like you must be at a UK - or, at least, not a US medical school? SDN is predominately US medical school oriented, so you may have better luck asking upperclasspeople at your school about books preferred in your country. While anatomy and biochemistry are the same everywhere, for clinicals specifically, there may be differences between countries (albeit small) in medications, algorithms and screening recommendations, so it may be a better bet to stick to books used locally.