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Call for DO success stories.

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stmclovin

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Many complaints on how DO students have not soo good rotation experiences, have fight some DO prejudice and strugle for good MD residency spots. Besides, these difficulties, lets talk about success stories. I am interested to hear about DO paths and possible to seek some inspiration. Lets talk about the the stars of the DO world and "super-successful" DO physians. Long stories are WELCOME!
 

RockfordWF

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Many complaints on how DO students have not soo good rotation experiences, have fight some DO prejudice and strugle for good MD residency spots. Besides, these difficulties, lets talk about success stories. I am interested to hear about DO paths and possible to seek some inspiration. Lets talk about the the stars of the DO world and "super-successful" DO physians. Long stories are WELCOME!

Most DO's go about their business like MD's. It's only those with problems or an agenda who post their complaints on the internet. Those who are doing well don't waste their time, so it is not visible...
 

endocardium

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Most DO's go about their business like MD's. It's only those with problems or an agenda who post their complaints on the internet. Those who are doing well don't waste their time, so it is not visible...

Agreed. There's no need to pontificate about this subject. There are plenty of successful osteopathic physicians.

Now, OP, get yourself in gear for the ride of your life. When med school starts, you won't have time to wonder much about such things...
 

SomeDoc

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Listen, earning your DO degree is a huge success in itself. Its a lot of hard work- regardless of which degree you end up earning in the end. So please stop these lame threads.
 

Buckeye(OH)

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To be totally honest, I find the topic of this thread to be fairly stupid. By asking that question, you are implying that a successful DO is a rarity.
 

stmclovin

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Listen, earning your DO degree is a huge success in itself. Its a lot of hard work- regardless of which degree you end up earning in the end. So please stop these lame threads.

Yeah, but plenty of people earn their MD's or DO's but not too many become truely successful physicians.
 

fireflygirl

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Yeah, but plenty of people earn their MD's or DO's but not too many become truely successful physicians.

::sigh:: I can see this getting so ugly.

So what are you deeming a "truly successful physician" and why is your definition the one to use?
 

scpod

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Well, based on 2004 data about one-thirtieth of one percent of Americans are doctors. In contrast, more than one percent of Americans are in jail. So....thirty times more people in America are in jail than are doctors. Doctors are certainly more succesful than those in jail, although a far smaller portion of the population.

I'll bet most of the American public would agree that, as a rule, doctors are more succesful than the average college grad. Only 28% of Americans have at least a Bachelor's degree, and I'd say they are more succesful than most high school grads. Let's face it-- money is one good way to gauge "sucess" and college grads average $51,206/year, while those with just a high school diploma get $27,915. Of course the hs diploma guys are more successful than the non-diploma guys who average $18,734.

Of course, there are some cultures who value machismo more than money and the migrant worker with 72 kids would be more "succesful" than the childless software engineer worth a billion dollars. And how about the geeky 24 year old who lives with his mom, bags groceries to pay for a lifetime supply of Proactive and has never been on a date. Yet, he advanced 60 levels in three hours in the latest online video game craze. Hmmmmm...a certain segment of the population would call him "succesful" too. The "succesful" women from my home town were able to find a man who could keep a job for more than a year, afford a doublewide trailer to live in and not cheat on them too much in public.

When you consider things, I believe just graduation from a DO or MD school is a pretty darned nice accomplishment.
 

Jpc984

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Well, based on 2004 data about one-thirtieth of one percent of Americans are doctors. In contrast, more than one percent of Americans are in jail. So....thirty times more people in America are in jail than are doctors. Doctors are certainly more succesful than those in jail, although a far smaller portion of the population.

I'll bet most of the American public would agree that, as a rule, doctors are more succesful than the average college grad. Only 28% of Americans have at least a Bachelor's degree, and I'd say they are more succesful than most high school grads. Let's face it-- money is one good way to gauge "sucess" and college grads average $51,206/year, while those with just a high school diploma get $27,915. Of course the hs diploma guys are more successful than the non-diploma guys who average $18,734.

Of course, there are some cultures who value machismo more than money and the migrant worker with 72 kids would be more "succesful" than the childless software engineer worth a billion dollars. And how about the geeky 24 year old who lives with his mom, bags groceries to pay for a lifetime supply of Proactive and has never been on a date. Yet, he advanced 60 levels in three hours in the latest online video game craze. Hmmmmm...a certain segment of the population would call him "succesful" too. The "succesful" women from my home town were able to find a man who could keep a job for more than a year, afford a doublewide trailer to live in and not cheat on them too much in public.

When you consider things, I believe just graduation from a DO or MD school is a pretty darned nice accomplishment.

what about the doctors in jail?
 

SomeDoc

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Yeah, but plenty of people earn their MD's or DO's but not too many become truely successful physicians.


Truly successful physicians will know how to spell truly. Helps with communication.
 
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stmclovin

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::sigh:: I can see this getting so ugly.

So what are you deeming a "truly successful physician" and why is your definition the one to use?

Ok, spelling nazis got me.

Many people graduate from medical school, but not that many become “truly successful.” Not everyone gets Nobel prize or not one really does something that changes the way we think about things. Of course, these are the extremes of success. There are examples of these people from MD world. I just wanted to talk about DOs in this thread. Who are the DO stars and what they have done to get there.

Graduating from a medical school means that you can become A doctor. Some are just better and more successful doctors than others.

I thought I asked a pretty simple question. Did not think I had to explain myself.
 

stmclovin

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I am talking about career success, if this makes anyone happier.
 

Colbert

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I plan on going into pediatrics. I won't make millions, I won't win a Noble prize, and I probably won't have a hospital wing named after me. Now if you want to say I won't be a successful physician because I decided I want to dedicate my life to helping children, then I'm not really concerned with your opinion of success.
 

endocardium

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Many people graduate from medical school, but not that many become "truly successful." ...

...Graduating from a medical school means that you can become A doctor. Some are just better and more successful doctors than others.

What? It's not enough for you to become a physician? Do you realize what an accomplishment it is to complete medical school and become a physician?

In general, it's not the glory-seekers who are the real heroes; it's the ones who quietly and selflessly do their jobs in the service of their community, rain or shine. Those are the heroes...

Anyway, osteopathic medicine, up until recently, hasn't been focused on developing the latest cancer drug, etc. The foundations of osteopathic medicine has been in something very basic and simple: being the very best physicians that we can to our patients and to our communities...

However, to answer what I think you are getting at, do a search in the military. DO's have a proud tradition there. Consider the past Surgeon General of the Army, etc...
 

bth7

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I live in a van.......

Agreed, this is hysterical.

One D.O. that inspires me is Enrico Fazzini, considered to be the leading expert on Parkinson's disease, in the world. He teaches at NYU and NYCOM med school. He's published a gazillion papers.

You an learn about other famous (and nefarious) D.O. physicians, here.

bth
 

stmclovin

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Agreed, this is hysterical.

One D.O. that inspires me is Enrico Fazzini, considered to be the leading expert on Parkinson's disease, in the world. He teaches at NYU and NYCOM med school. He's published a gazillion papers.

You an learn about other famous (and nefarious) D.O. physicians, here.

bth

How come only few DOs are listed and I think I can probably doubt the importance of probably half people on that list.
 

tlvuong4

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Many complaints on how DO students have not soo good rotation experiences, have fight some DO prejudice and strugle for good MD residency spots. Besides, these difficulties, lets talk about success stories. I am interested to hear about DO paths and possible to seek some inspiration. Lets talk about the the stars of the DO world and "super-successful" DO physians. Long stories are WELCOME!

From your past threads
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=499988
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=493219

Seems like you got some real confidence issues. If you are that unsure about the DO profession, don't do it. If you don't think it can get you anywhere successful or feel any type of self-respect with a DO behind your name, don't do it.

Anywhere between 1000-2000 students apply to a DO school per year and perhaps 100 will matriculate. Not everyone one has the same goals, not everyone becomes the top of their class, and not ev1 becomes these so-called "stars" you are looking for. Most become "regular" physicians.

I'll tell you a little secret. If you want to know what successful DO's have done to get there, it's simple really. Work hard. That's it.

And yes, stop with the lame threads.
 

bth7

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How come only few DOs are listed and I think I can probably doubt the importance of probably half people on that list.

I suppose that there's several reasons for this:

1. Wikipedia is somewhat biased towards recent events.

2. Doctors don't get wikipedia articles of their very own unless they become famous, i.e. Richard Jadick or Phog Allen, or William Anderson. Most of the physicians on Wikipedia are people who discovered a disease or won a Nobel prize in medicine. As far as I know, no D.O. has ever won a Nobel, the closest is probably Enrico Fazzini.

If you know of some more D.O.s who are famous (like Will Kirby) or who are really important to the history of Osteopathic medicine, you should create a stub article under that name. That way wikipedians will start researching articles about those people.

The only article on Wikipedia right now that's even halfway decent regarding osteopathic medicine is "Osteopathic medicine in the United States" and maybe the one about "A.T. Still."

But if you create them, and find good sources to back them up, there will be more!

bth
 
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bth7

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From your past threads
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=499988
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=493219

Seems like you got some real confidence issues. If you are that unsure about the DO profession, don't do it. If you don't think it can get you anywhere successful or feel any type of self-respect with a DO behind your name, don't do it.

Anywhere between 1000-2000 students apply to a DO school per year and perhaps 100 will matriculate. Not everyone one has the same goals, not everyone becomes the top of their class, and not ev1 becomes these so-called "stars" you are looking for. Most become "regular" physicians.

I'll tell you a little secret. If you want to know what successful DO's have done to get there, it's simple really. Work hard. That's it.

And yes, stop with the lame threads.

Not exactly a warm welcome to the profession.

To the OP, I'm sorry that some people feel it necessary to make a personal attack on you for asking a perfectly legitimate question.

Unfortunately, you'll find people with similar attitudes in both the osteopathic and allopathic worlds.

I hope this nonsense doesn't turn you off to pursuing a career in osteopathic medicine. Just ignore it. And keep asking your questions!

bth
 

norhpen

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Success is definitely self defined depending on what you set for your goals in life. For myself, I was at a top college, and almost let everything slip away due to excessive partying and not paying close attention to academics. I graduated with a 2.9 and scored a 28 on the MCAT. Life was miserable. Medical school admissions were extremely tough during the time that I applied. I was taking classes to improve upon my application, and I was working as an EMT for 8 bucks an hour to get by. I told myself that if I ever got into medical school, I would do my best and never look back, seeking to achieve placement at the best training institutions that I could. Since then, I've been blessed. Every step I took up the ladder seemed to repeat itself. I looked at one osteopathic medical school and was accepted. I applied to one university based program, was accepted, and served as chief resident there. By fellowship (again, I looked at one program and was accepted), I had made my way into a top 10 university based subspecialty program. I'm doing great research and receiving great training. Now, I'm close to finishing fellowship, and looking at staying within academia and further subspecializing within my field. It's been a great and a crazy ride so far, but in my sense of success, I'm making it. The rest remains to be seen. D.O. or M.D., it doesn't really matter to me. I'm just glad to be doing what I'm doing.
 

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I agree that the definition of "successful" that you seek is vague, but I'll throw a couple of bones out:

At Maine Medical Center in Portland:
Matthew M. Hand, DO
-Chief of Pediatric Nephrology
-Lead chapter author of the section on renal disorders in [at least the last ed. of] Roger's Textbook of Pediatric Intensive Care (considered one of the great texts in peds CCM
-First DO to train at Children's Hospital Boston (not historically "DO friendly"
-Truly beloved by patients and staff at the hospital (and med students who work with him)

Kenneth P Cicuto, DO, FSIR
-Only interventional radiologist at the hospital (IR docs are usually considered pretty successful by default)

OK I'll even throw myself in: BFA in graphic design, DO from UNECOM 2005 (middle-of-the-road in my particularly smart class [I think we had the highest COMLEX pass rate of the last 5 years]). Have done well in residency (peds) and was selected by the Air Force to train in Pediatric Cardiology at their expense (bless their hearts). Interviewed at three great programs (Duke, Iowa, and Mayo) and accepted by two and withdrew application from the third when I accepted a position at another. As and aside: to my knowledge and ability to see lists of previous grads: Mayo and Iowa have never trained a DO. Duke has a DO as a 4th year interventional fellow. No one at Mayo or Iowa asked about my being a DO, nor even hinted at it being an issue. The only time it was mentioned at Duke was when one of my interviewers said something to the effect of "Yeah, our 4th year cath fellow went to one of the schools in Pennsylvania". And Peds Cards is one of the few truly competetive Peds fellowships.
 

enfuegoEP

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Ok, spelling nazis got me.

Many people graduate from medical school, but not that many become "truly successful." Not everyone gets Nobel prize or not one really does something that changes the way we think about things. Of course, these are the extremes of success. There are examples of these people from MD world. I just wanted to talk about DOs in this thread. Who are the DO stars and what they have done to get there.

Graduating from a medical school means that you can become A doctor. Some are just better and more successful doctors than others.

I thought I asked a pretty simple question. Did not think I had to explain myself.

You're statement depends on what you consider successful. For me, I find making the correct diagnosis and coming up with an effective treatment plan a measure of success. A doctor can make lots of money and provide poor patient care and still not be a successful doctor.
 

bravotwozero

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Mayo and Iowa have never trained a DO. Duke has a DO as a 4th year interventional fellow. No one at Mayo or Iowa asked about my being a DO, nor even hinted at it being an issue.

NSU matched two grads into Mayo last year, one of which matched into their General Surgery program.
 

J-Rad

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Specifically, Mayo and Iowa Pediatric Cardiology programs have not trained any DO's in the past. Both institutions have trained DO's in other programss; one of my own classmates from UNECOM is a psych resident at Mayo.
 

stmclovin

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You're statement depends on what you consider successful. For me, I find making the correct diagnosis and coming up with an effective treatment plan a measure of success.

That's kind of what is expected from a doctor at a bare minimum. I am talking about DO leaders, people who have changed the way we approach things.
 
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enfuegoEP

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That's kind of what is expected from a doctor at a bare minimum. I am talking about DO leaders, people who have changed the way we approach things.

If it's obvious to you, then you'll know that whatever degree letters behind your name, success is what you can do FOR YOUR patient. What you're talking about is superficial appraise and financial gain. The two are completely separate. Don't mix the two. The degree is a means to an end. Whether it be MD or DO the bottom line is patient care. You're fundamental mistake is to think that what school you graduate from dictates what kind of success you'll be... But your idea of success differs from mine and most of the other doctors I've met. You find success in money and name recognition, whereas someone who values being a successful physician places theirs in diagnosing and treating disease. Your question reveals more about you than it does a particular degree. If you need social prestige or money to feel satisfied, your pursuit of happiness in medicine is futile. Unless you embrace the true meaning of being a doctor, which is healing your fellow man/women/child, and abandon the flawed thought process that money=success, medicine will be your advisary and you'll be truly unhappy. Go to law school...you'll be much more successful and happy.
 

JaggerPlate

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If it's obvious to you, then you'll know that whatever degree letters behind your name, success is what you can do FOR YOUR patient. What you're talking about is superficial appraise and financial gain. The two are completely separate. Don't mix the two. The degree is a means to an end. Whether it be MD or DO the bottom line is patient care. You're fundamental mistake is to think that what school you graduate from dictates what kind of success you'll be... But your idea of success differs from mine and most of the other doctors I've met. You find success in money and name recognition, whereas someone who values being a successful physician places theirs in diagnosing and treating disease. Your question reveals more about you than it does a particular degree. If you need social prestige or money to feel satisfied, your pursuit of happiness in medicine is futile. Unless you embrace the true meaning of being a doctor, which is healing your fellow man/women/child, and abandon the flawed thought process that money=success, medicine will be your advisary and you'll be truly unhappy. Go to law school...you'll be much more successful and happy.

That's hilarious .... Yeah, get into a top notch law school (law is a game where you need to attend fantastic law schools to find extreme success) to even have a chance of making decent money doing corporate law - working behind a desk doing paper work all day. If you want to actually prosecute or be an ADA or anything ... prepare to make far less money than any FP or Internal med guy out there.

"The median expected salary for a typical Physician - Generalist in the United States is $142,999. This basic market pricing report was prepared using our Certified Compensation Professionals' analysis of survey data collected from thousands of HR departments at employers of all sizes, industries and geographies."

"
The median expected salary for a typical Attorney I in the United States is $86,677. This basic market pricing report was prepared using our Certified Compensation Professionals' analysis of survey data collected from thousands of HR departments at employers of all sizes, industries and geographies."

http://swz.salary.com/salarywizard/layouthtmls/swzl_salarycenter.html



 

Crt428

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Yeah, but plenty of people earn their MD's or DO's but not too many become truely successful physicians.

I really hope people with mentality such as yours are the minority in CCOM 2012, else we're going to have one lame class
 

stmclovin

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Isn't giving a patient a correct diagnosis is really a bare minimum of what a doctor should do. That's why I do not call it success that it is what is expected.
 

endocardium

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Isn't giving a patient a correct diagnosis is really a bare minimum of what a doctor should do. That's why I do not call it success that it is what is expected.

Oh, you have much to learn, my friend. ;)
 

prionsRbad

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Isn't giving a patient a correct diagnosis is really a bare minimum of what a doctor should do. That's why I do not call it success that it is what is expected.

You should read this: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full...or&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT

It will be up to your patients to decide if you are a "good doctor" and it's really their opinion that you should care about anyway. You are very misinformed if you think that a "good or successful" doctor must have won the Nobel Prize, made a huge leap in scientific research, was the surgeon general or went to the moon. Being a good doctor is like being a good person and what can you really measure that with? The answer is how you treat people and what others (IE your patients) remember you by.

Good Luck, you have a lot to learn! Good thing you have a lot of life left to live . . . plenty of time for you to "get it". :luck:
 

stmclovin

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You should read this: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full...or&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT

It will be up to your patients to decide if you are a "good doctor" and it's really their opinion that you should care about anyway. You are very misinformed if you think that a "good or successful" doctor must have won the Nobel Prize, made a huge leap in scientific research, was the surgeon general or went to the moon. Being a good doctor is like being a good person and what can you really measure that with? The answer is how you treat people and what others (IE your patients) remember you by.

Good Luck, you have a lot to learn! Good thing you have a lot of life left to live . . . plenty of time for you to "get it". :luck:

I think you guys are not getting my point. I think I should create a new thread since a lot of people are not happy with word "success." What's the point of argueing with people over internet. I think I wil lcreate a new thread with a more specific question.
 

endocardium

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I think you guys are not getting my point. I think I should create a new thread since a lot of people are not happy with word "success." What's the point of argueing with people over internet. I think I wil lcreate a new thread with a more specific question.

With all due respect, I think it is you that is not getting the message. It doesn't have to do with the words you are using as much as what is being expressed between them. You can make a new thread with different words, but it will have similar results, I think.

Anyway, meditate on that... Re-read some of the posts here. Remember to appreciate what is around you; keep your mind and eyes truly open as you humbly learn. It's a long journey. I think you'll probably discover what some of the folks here are pointing out as you progress. ;)
 

Colbert

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I think you guys are not getting my point. I think I should create a new thread since a lot of people are not happy with word "success." What's the point of argueing with people over internet. I think I wil lcreate a new thread with a more specific question.

Please don't.
 

prionsRbad

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I think you guys are not getting my point. I think I should create a new thread since a lot of people are not happy with word "success." What's the point of argueing with people over internet. I think I wil lcreate a new thread with a more specific question.

You have yet to define it yourself. Why don't you try . . .
 

DrWBD

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The OP asked a legitimate question.
It's too bad so many insecure premeds and med students here feel the need to perseverate on the "definition" of a successful physician and attack the questioner.
 
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