mksapboy

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I'm interested in Peditric Neuro but was a little disheartened to learn the tract is peds, then peds neuor, and not neuro and then peds neuro fellowship.
With the peds/neuro training will there be ample ability to be an adult neurologist as well? IE will teh workplace view me as an adult neurologist?The peds neuro I know here practice peds neuro but also likes practicing gen peds. My desire would be the opposite.
I have both inpatient and outpatient interests. Thanks.
 

neurologist

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mksapboy said:
I'm interested in Peditric Neuro but was a little disheartened to learn the tract is peds, then peds neuor, and not neuro and then peds neuro fellowship.
With the peds/neuro training will there be ample ability to be an adult neurologist as well? IE will teh workplace view me as an adult neurologist?The peds neuro I know here practice peds neuro but also likes practicing gen peds. My desire would be the opposite.
I have both inpatient and outpatient interests. Thanks.
All pediatric neurologists are board certified in both "neurology" in general, which includes adult neurology, and in pediatric neurology. So, yes, you can practice both, depending on your personal level of comfort and competence.

How you get your peds neuro and adult neuro training depends on the program you go through. It is possible to do a neurology residency first, then peds neuro (but you would also have to do basically a year of straight peds internship).
 

f_w

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Many pedi neurologists in private practice also have an adult neuro component. It is rather difficult to make a living on pedi neuro alone.

Kids in general tend to have rather crappy health insurance. If they are lucky, they have parents who work and thereby get 2nd rate HMO coverage. If they are less fortunate, their parents either don't work or work for one of the MacSomething employers that don't offer family coverage. They then tend to be under medicaid or child health plus or some other goverment program. Also, the cases tend to be complex, the reimbursement structure doesn't reflect that complexity not terribly well.

Adult neuro reimburses allright. I knew more than one peds neurologists who saw kids only 2-3 days a week and made his money on workmans comp type back-pain work the rest of the time.
 
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mksapboy

mksapboy

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f_w said:
Many pedi neurologists in private practice also have an adult neuro component. It is rather difficult to make a living on pedi neuro alone.

Kids in general tend to have rather crappy health insurance. If they are lucky, they have parents who work and thereby get 2nd rate HMO coverage. If they are less fortunate, their parents either don't work or work for one of the MacSomething employers that don't offer family coverage. They then tend to be under medicaid or child health plus or some other goverment program. Also, the cases tend to be complex, the reimbursement structure doesn't reflect that complexity not terribly well.

Adult neuro reimburses allright. I knew more than one peds neurologists who saw kids only 2-3 days a week and made his money on workmans comp type back-pain work the rest of the time.
ANy idea which fellowships are "money makers" for adult neurology? EMG? Stroke? which are the best compensated subspecialty fellowships? and what type of improvement in compensation?
 

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Where I'm from, Peds Neuro does only peds neuro. That may be more typical of an academic center.
 

f_w

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Where I'm from, Peds Neuro does only peds neuro. That may be more typical of an academic center.
As I said, in private practice it is difficult to carve out a living on pedi neuro. In academia or large multispecialty groups, the department will subsidize incomes so they can offer the service. But it is allways difficult to be the one 'who doesn't pull his weight' within a group of physicians. No matter how valuable your service to your patients and your local community is, for your own professional standing this is not good.
 
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