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Can anyone answer this for me??

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by GoingUp, Jan 6, 2009.

  1. GoingUp

    5+ Year Member

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    Ok....I read all over this site that everyone says "avoid nursing as a major" and so on.....avoid becoming an RN before pursuing med school. But can someone please tell me why this is a bad idea???? Why do adcoms look down on this?
     
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  3. vadd0

    Physician 10+ Year Member

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    I have never heard that advice, but I believe that the nursing program would prevent you from taking the material needed to matriculate into medical school. You would likely have to take another two years of school to cover your pre-requisites.
     
  4. GoingUp

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    yes...you are right. It does prevent me from taking many of the pre-reqs while in nursing school.....but other than a time issue, do you know why people advise against nursing???? i can't help but think of the clinical experience that I will have gained, and am gaining right now....i thinnk this would only help me.
     
  5. 236116

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    Nursing and medicine are very different things, so it makes you look confused/not dedicated.

    With the nursing shortage, you've taken the place of someone who would have liked to take the training and been a nurse forever. It is very expensive-- not just $-wise, but in terms of time and other resources (planning clinicals comes to mind)-- to train a nurse, and to have someone do the training and then skip off to med school is a terrible waste.
     
  6. GoingUp

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    hey jurassic....nice to hear from you again. :D


    but i do have some issues with the idea that i would be not dedicated/confused. Even though nursing is very different from medicine, and i am well aware of the differences....but whats to be said to the english major? english is very different from medicine....will they also be perceived as not dedicated/confused?
     
  7. WhizoMD

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    if you have the time go for it I guess.... But, it kinda doesn't make sense to spend 4 years learning skills that you'll either relearn in medical school or not use as a doctor altogether. Unless you plan on working as nurse through med school, but that doesn't seem feasible sense nurse hours and nature of work can be pretty stressful on their own, without the hours and hours of work/studying med school requires.
     
  8. airplanes

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    Nursing and Medicine are in the health field. An English major could be construed as another diverse interest.
     
  9. Dr Lyss

    Dr Lyss Professional Student
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    nursing is a profession. Yes you will gain clinical exposure but it will be difficult to fit in the time to do your prereqs or do any other type of volunteering (not sure if you would need to but I'm guessing if your only exposure is nursing then you won't have many diverse experiences about medicine).
     
  10. whimsical

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    I'm just wondering if it is also frowned upon to get training as a CNA in order to gain clinical experience. That's not my primary degree, but there are courses that run only 4 or 5 weeks and it seems like a good way to spend a lot of paid time with patients. I just wonder if it's looked at as a lack of focus as well?
     

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