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dboy

Let's say you're a doctor, and your wife asks you for some Lunesta (Rx Sleeping aid )that you keep at the house, would you be allowed to give it to her or would you be breaking the law? What would you do?
 

Blue Dog

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The short answer is that you really shouldn't treat yourself or family members except when absolutely necessary. It's always a good idea to limit prescribing (especially controlled substances) to people with whom you have a legitimate doctor-patient relationship. If the first rule of medicine is "Do no harm," the second is undoubtedly "Cover your ass." ;)

That being said, do whatever you're comfortable doing.

Refer to this thread for more information.
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=295643
 

vtucci

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There are ethical guidelines that prohibit treating family members. Most countries

Also, not all docs can prescribe painkillers and schedule 2 narcotics. Some states require a special license for these and even then, if you prescribe substantially more than your colleagues, you could be in for trafficking charges. Take care.
 

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vtucci said:
There are ethical guidelines that prohibit treating family members. Most countries

Also, not all docs can prescribe painkillers and schedule 2 narcotics. Some states require a special license for these and even then, if you prescribe substantially more than your colleagues, you could be in for trafficking charges. Take care.
Agree. If you start writing scrips for some of the more recreational medications, you are going to set off lots of red flags and scrutiny. Let your folks score their highs on the streets like everyone else's. :)
 

YouDontKnowJack

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what? you can't provide free medical care to family members? even if it's your specialty? if i'm a cardiologist, i expect to be able to treat htn in my family. Why should i call another cardiologist if I can do the stuff myself.

that's what my family is looking forward to. free meds and free visits.... when necessary
 
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dboy

KentW said:
The short answer is that you really shouldn't treat yourself or family members except when absolutely necessary. It's always a good idea to limit prescribing (especially controlled substances) to people with whom you have a legitimate doctor-patient relationship. If the first rule of medicine is "Do no harm," the second is undoubtedly "Cover your ass." ;)

That being said, do whatever you're comfortable doing.

Refer to this thread for more information.
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=295643
Yes, I understand the risk you take by prescribing controlled substances to family members, but what if your wife asks you for something like Lunesta that you keep at the house, would you be allowed to give it to her or would she have to have a prescription just like anybody else? Would you really tell your wife she couldn't have a sleeping pill if she couldn't sleep because she didn't have a prescription?
 

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YouDontKnowJack said:
what? you can't provide free medical care to family members?

that's what my family is looking forward to. free meds and free visits.... when necessary
I recommend reading some of the links that were posted in the other thread.
 

YouDontKnowJack

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dboy said:
Yes, I understand the risk you take by prescribing controlled substances to family members, but what if your wife asks you for something like Lunesta that you keep at the house, would you be allowed to give it to her or would she have to have a prescription just like anybody else? Would you really tell your wife she couldn't have a sleeping pill if she couldn't sleep because she didn't have a prescription?


you say: sorry honey. you'll have to call up a doctor, and wait 7 weeks for an appointment. I guess you'll just have to be an insomniac for 7 weeks. tough sh**.
 

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dboy said:
Would you really tell your wife she couldn't have a sleeping pill if she couldn't sleep because she didn't have a prescription?
Again, do what you're comfortable doing. In general, there are pitfalls to treating family members, but not necessarily in every possible scenario.
 

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YouDontKnowJack said:
you'll have to call up a doctor, and wait 7 weeks for an appointment.
If it takes you seven weeks to get an appointment with your primary care doctor, you need to find a new doctor. ;)
 
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dboy

If you would seriously tell that to your wife, I'm sure you would be hearing from her attorney the next day. Then the both of you will need some sleeping pills =)
 

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dboy said:
Let's say you're a doctor, and your wife asks you for some Lunesta (Rx Sleeping aid )that you keep at the house, would you be allowed to give it to her or would you be breaking the law? What would you do?
the answer is you CAN but "perhaps you shouldn't". physicians self-prescribe and prescribe for family members all the time, and it doesn't seem like the practice is on the decline. i don't feel it's an appropriate use of time for a doctor to spend an hour in a waiting room to see some NP or PA so that his kid can get some eyedrops for conjunctivitis or a z-pack for a standard bacterial infection. and i feel the same goes for a short course of lunesta or ambien for acute insomnia. just don't give your wife vicodin and you should be fine.
 

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anon-y-mouse said:
the answer is you CAN but "perhaps you shouldn't". physicians self-prescribe and prescribe for family members all the time, and it doesn't seem like the practice is on the decline. i don't feel it's an appropriate use of time for a doctor to spend an hour in a waiting room to see some NP or PA so that his kid can get some eyedrops for conjunctivitis or a z-pack for a standard bacterial infection. and i feel the same goes for a short course of lunesta or ambien for acute insomnia. just don't give your wife vicodin and you should be fine.
Nicely said. AFAIK There are no rules against treating your family members but if you do you should also treat them/follow same protocol required/done as any other patient. Now if someone's going to get your ass if you don't do this because u prescribed ur child some allegra vs. prescribing some percocet for your wife is obviously going to be different. I don't believe there are any rules against it just some ethical concerns... But say, for example, a Gen Practioner in the middle of a rural area isn't going to have his family member go 1 hr away to see a doctor esp since he may be PCP already. That said one could always get a colleague to treat/write a Rx. Wouldn't have to wait 7 weeks for that :)
 

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DizzyNT said:
I don't believe there are any rules against it just some ethical concerns
Actually, there are laws governing the prescribing of controlled substances. These vary from state to state slightly, but in nearly every case you are prohibited from prescribing controlled substances to people with whom you do not have a legitimate doctor-patient relationship. There's a quarterly newsletter that the Virginia Board of Medicine publishes with a section I call the "yellow pages" (it's printed on yellow paper) that lists all of the physicians who have been disciplined by the board that quarter, and why. Far and away the most common infraction is the inappropriate prescribing of controlled substances. The penalties range from censure (basically a slap on the wrist) to revocation of licensure, depending on the circumstances.

If your wife needs some Allegra, fine...write the prescription yourself, especially if you're on vacation or it's the weekend and there aren't any other practical options available. If she needs Percocet, you're taking a chance, no matter what the situation is. Find another way.
 

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YouDontKnowJack said:
what? you can't provide free medical care to family members? even if it's your specialty? if i'm a cardiologist, i expect to be able to treat htn in my family. Why should i call another cardiologist if I can do the stuff myself.

that's what my family is looking forward to. free meds and free visits.... when necessary
Not only are there ethical concerns with treating your own family, but what if you botch their case? You don't want that hanging over you.

The docs I know give their colleagues and families 'professional courtesies' -- they won't charge each other for office visits. So yeah there can be 'free stuff' depending on the friends you make later.