sv3

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I know that the passages can introduce new information and that it can be wacky/unrealistic and I am totally cool with that.

What I'm wondering is, for example, could the passage describe Insulin as a hormone that does something it really doesn't do? (i.e regulate plasma Ca or even worse, increase blood glucose levels?).

I just prefer to skim over passages, especially when i understand the content of the passage. I just wanted to make sure this was ok and that the above scenario could not happen. I know to expect the unexpected but should i expect the wrong?

thanks

sv3
 

Cunninglinguist

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I know that the passages can introduce new information and that it can be wacky/unrealistic and I am totally cool with that.

What I'm wondering is, for example, could the passage describe Insulin as a hormone that does something it really doesn't do? (i.e regulate plasma Ca or even worse, increase blood glucose levels?).

I just prefer to skim over passages, especially when i understand the content of the passage. I just wanted to make sure this was ok and that the above scenario could not happen. I know to expect the unexpected but should i expect the wrong?

thanks

sv3

Simple answer, no.


But you should be careful, the MCAT can set-up interactions that can change the answer to a specific question. I used to miss question quite a bit that I would bring extra knowledge into, but as soon as I just started relying on the passage information alone and forgetting the additional information I knew about the topic at exam time my scores went up. Don't forget though, you still need to use common sense. But I have never seen a passage that gives incorrect information.
 
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sv3

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Feb 24, 2009
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Simple answer, no.


But you should be careful, the MCAT can set-up interactions that can change the answer to a specific question. I used to miss question quite a bit that I would bring extra knowledge into, but as soon as I just started relying on the passage information alone and forgetting the additional information I knew about the topic at exam time my scores went up. Don't forget though, you still need to use common sense. But I have never seen a passage that gives incorrect information.
Great thanks. Thats good to know and for sure I'll be focusing on anything out of the ordinary on the passages.........that's been a running theme with bio lately from what i've heard.....

cheers
 

Cunninglinguist

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Great thanks. Thats good to know and for sure I'll be focusing on anything out of the ordinary on the passages.........that's been a running theme with bio lately from what i've heard.....

cheers
Don't dwell on stuff though. Just read it, then go to the questions. Sometimes you can waste time thinking about concepts and making sure you feel like you completely understand it when they don't even test you on it.
 
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sv3

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Don't dwell on stuff though. Just read it, then go to the questions. Sometimes you can waste time thinking about concepts and making sure you feel like you completely understand it when they don't even test you on it.
I intially was gonna do the questions first but nowadays people say reading the bio passage is key. I tend to skim the science passages alot. It seems that most of the time, you can answer at least 50% of the questions without looking at the passage (unless TPR is throwing me for a loop). If I read for detail I'm screwed - i have an issue moving on from something i don't get. and yes..........verbal is a pain in the butt for me!
 

herewego

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The key is to find balance between answering what you realistically can answer without reading, and having a good grasp of the passage. Yes, there have been times where I literally didn't have to read a thing. But I wouldn't take this as the status quo, nor would I recommend treating every passage like that.